19

A friend asked me to explain why

const const const const const int const i = 0;

is valid syntax. I declined to have any thoughts on the subject. Though I'm curious if it is just a grammar thing?

Edit. Tag is C++, my friend was referencing gcc, so I should probably add the C tag.

9
  • 4
    It’s not. – Konrad Rudolph Dec 12 '13 at 18:45
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    @Konrad. It is valid C but invalid C++. (didnt intent to delete) – Guilherme Bernal Dec 12 '13 at 18:48
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    @GuilhermeBernal In that case, my comment stands: the question is tagged c++. Since these are separate languages that shouldn’t be confused, I’m not sure what your comment adds. Now the OP has added the c tag, that changes things. – Konrad Rudolph Dec 12 '13 at 18:49
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    I was confused about the language in question. However I would have expected this to translate to both c and c++. Even though the excellent answer proves otherwise. – Captain Giraffe Dec 12 '13 at 18:51
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    Interestingly, g++ will generate an error for double const even outside C++11 mode (where it's actually allowed), but it will not complain in any way about constexpr const (which of course isn't quite the same thing, but still somewhat superfluous in the same way). – Damon Dec 12 '13 at 19:16
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From n1256:

6.7.3/4

If the same qualifier appears more than once in the same specifier-qualifier-list,either directly or via one or more typedefs, the behavior is the same as if it appeared only once.

In C++, this should give an error.

From C++03 standard:

7.1.5/1 [dcl.type]

As a general rule, at most one type-specifier is allowed in the complete decl-specifier-seq of a declaration. The only exceptions to this rule are the following:

— const or volatile can be combined with any other type-specifier. However, redundant cv- qualifiers are prohibited except when introduced through the use of typedefs (7.1.3) or template type arguments (14.3), in which case the redundant cv-qualifiers are ignored.

From N3797 (C++11):

7.1.6/2 [dcl.type]

As a general rule, at most one type-specifier is allowed in the complete decl-specifier-seq of a declaration or in a type-specifier-seq or trailing-type-specifier-seq. The only exceptions to this rule are the following:

— const can be combined with any type specifier except itself.
1
  • Same with &, I believe. typedef int& t; typedef t& u; will mean u and t are the same type. (Beware literal && though, that's c++11) – Aaron McDaid Dec 21 '13 at 13:01

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