I am trying to setup signing process so that keystore password and key password are not stored in the project's build.gradle file.

Currently I have the following in the build.gradle:

android {
    ...
    signingConfigs {
        release {
            storeFile file("my.keystore")
            storePassword "store_password"
            keyAlias "my_key_alias"
            keyPassword "key_password"
        }
    }

    buildTypes {
        release {
            signingConfig signingConfigs.release            
        }
    }
}

It works perfectly fine but I must not put the values for the storePassword, and keyPassword in my repository. I would prefer to not put storeFile and keyAlias there either.

Is there a way to alter the build.gradle so that it will obtain passwords from some external source (like a file that resides on my computer only)?

And of course, the altered build.gradle should be usable on any other computer (even if the computer doesn't have access to passwords).

I am using Android Studio and in Mac OS X Maverics if it does matter.

  • "And of course, the altered build.gradle should be usable on any other computer (even if the computer doesn't have access to passwords)" -- if the data is not in build.gradle, you will have to have something other than build.gradle, whether that's an adjustment to environment variables (per one answer), a properties file (per another answer), or some other means. If you are unwilling to have things outside of build.gradle, then by definition all the signing information has to be inside buid.gradle. – CommonsWare Dec 13 '13 at 18:42
  • 2
    @CommonsWare You are right. I didn't tell I want to have anything strictly within the build.gradle, though. And I did tell that build.gradle could obtain passwords from some external source (like a file that resides on my computer only – Bobrovsky Dec 13 '13 at 18:49
  • Possible duplicate of How to create a release signed apk file using Gradle? – user2768 Nov 24 '15 at 20:24
  • I've flagged as a duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/18328730/…, on the basis of meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/311044/… – user2768 Nov 24 '15 at 20:25

10 Answers 10

up vote 99 down vote accepted

The nice thing about Groovy is that you can freely mix Java code, and it's pretty easy to read in a key/value file using java.util.Properties. Perhaps there's an even easier way using idiomatic Groovy, but Java is still pretty simple.

Create a keystore.properties file (in this example, in the root directory of your project next to settings.gradle, though you can put it wherever you like:

storePassword=...
keyPassword=...
keyAlias=...
storeFile=...

Add this to your build.gradle:

allprojects {
    afterEvaluate { project ->
        def propsFile = rootProject.file('keystore.properties')
        def configName = 'release'

        if (propsFile.exists() && android.signingConfigs.hasProperty(configName)) {
            def props = new Properties()
            props.load(new FileInputStream(propsFile))
            android.signingConfigs[configName].storeFile = file(props['storeFile'])
            android.signingConfigs[configName].storePassword = props['storePassword']
            android.signingConfigs[configName].keyAlias = props['keyAlias']
            android.signingConfigs[configName].keyPassword = props['keyPassword']
        }
    }
}
  • 26
    I had to remove the quotes from my keystore.properties – Jacob Tabak Jan 26 '14 at 7:58
  • 6
    It doesn't generate the signed version for me with plugin version 0.9.+. What am I supposed to do with the signingConfigs block and buildTypes.release.signingConfig item? remove them? – Fernando Gallego Jun 3 '14 at 15:59
  • 1
    Seems that setting storeFile to any valid value (e.g. storeFile file('AndroidManifest.xml')) and then later overriding it causes the signing process to take place. – miracle2k Sep 11 '14 at 7:18
  • 3
    Building results in an error Error:(24, 0) Could not find property 'android' on root project 'RootProjectName' where line 24 is the one with the if-block. Adding apply plugin: 'com.android.application' to the root build.gradle also lets the build fail. What am I doing wrong? – PhilLab Mar 9 '15 at 13:32
  • 1
    This is a great solution, though kind of regretting not reading @JacobTabak 's comment first. – RobinBattle Jan 11 '17 at 6:42

Alternatively, if you want to apply Scott Barta's answer in a way more similar to the auto generated gradle code, you can create a keystore.properties file in your project root folder:

storePassword=my.keystore
keyPassword=key_password
keyAlias=my_key_alias
storeFile=store_file  

and modify your gradle code to:

// Load keystore
def keystorePropertiesFile = rootProject.file("keystore.properties");
def keystoreProperties = new Properties()
keystoreProperties.load(new FileInputStream(keystorePropertiesFile))

...

android{

    ...

    signingConfigs {
        release {
            storeFile file(keystoreProperties['storeFile'])
            storePassword keystoreProperties['storePassword']
            keyAlias keystoreProperties['keyAlias']
            keyPassword keystoreProperties['keyPassword']
        }
    }

    ...

}

You can store this properties file in the root of your module, in which case just omit rootProject, and you can also modify this code to have several sets of properties for different keystores and key aliases.

  • 4
    Works great. I used if ( keystorePropertiesFile.exists() ) to make sure the file is present before trying to get the attributes and try to sign. – Joshua Pinter Sep 15 '17 at 17:32
  • And don't forget to add .txt extension in the end of keystore.properties file. – Levon Petrosyan Feb 17 at 9:43
  • 4
    You shouldn't need a .txt extension on the keystore.properties file. – Matt Zukowski Mar 27 at 22:13

The easiest way is to create a ~/.gradle/gradle.properties file.

ANDROID_STORE_PASSWORD=hunter2
ANDROID_KEY_PASSWORD=hunter2

Then your build.gradle file can look like this:

android {
    signingConfigs {
        release {
            storeFile file('yourfile.keystore')
            storePassword ANDROID_STORE_PASSWORD
            keyAlias 'youralias'
            keyPassword ANDROID_KEY_PASSWORD
        }
    }
    buildTypes {
        release {
            signingConfig signingConfigs.release
        }
    }
}
  • 1
    Should i gitignore ~/.gradle/gradle.properties? – vzhen Dec 30 '17 at 14:10
  • The full instructions is also in react native documentation. – Pencilcheck Jan 11 at 18:34
  • Nice, works like a charm – i_tanova Oct 2 at 16:12

After reading a few links:

http://blog.macromates.com/2006/keychain-access-from-shell/ http://www.thoughtworks.com/es/insights/blog/signing-open-source-android-apps-without-disclosing-passwords

Since you are using Mac OSX, you can use the Keychain Access to store your passwords.

How to add password in Keychain Access

Then in your gradle scripts:

/* Get password from Mac OSX Keychain */
def getPassword(String currentUser, String keyChain) {
    def stdout = new ByteArrayOutputStream()
    def stderr = new ByteArrayOutputStream()
    exec {
        commandLine 'security', '-q', 'find-generic-password', '-a', currentUser, '-gl', keyChain
        standardOutput = stdout
        errorOutput = stderr
        ignoreExitValue true
    }
    //noinspection GroovyAssignabilityCheck
    (stderr.toString().trim() =~ /password: '(.*)'/)[0][1]
}

Use like this:

getPassword(currentUser, "Android_Store_Password")

/* Plugins */
apply plugin: 'com.android.application'

/* Variables */
ext.currentUser = System.getenv("USER")
ext.userHome = System.getProperty("user.home")
ext.keystorePath = 'KEY_STORE_PATH'

/* Signing Configs */
android {  
    signingConfigs {
        release {
            storeFile file(userHome + keystorePath + project.name)
            storePassword getPassword(currentUser, "ANDROID_STORE_PASSWORD")
            keyAlias 'jaredburrows'
            keyPassword getPassword(currentUser, "ANDROID_KEY_PASSWORD")
        }
    }

    buildTypes {
        release {
            signingConfig signingConfigs.release
        }
    }
}
  • 2
    although your answer only applies to Mac OSX, I really like it! Note that the second link you provided contains a backup solution for other platforms, in case someone needs to implement multi-platform support. – Delblanco Jul 23 '14 at 13:31

This is how I do it. Use Environment Variables

  signingConfigs {
    release {
        storeFile file(System.getenv("KEYSTORE"))
        storePassword System.getenv("KEYSTORE_PASSWORD")
        keyAlias System.getenv("KEY_ALIAS")
        keyPassword System.getenv("KEY_PASSWORD")
    }
  • 3
    Unfortunately, this requires system environments to be created for each project on each computer. Otherwise I get following error Neither path nor baseDir may be null or empty string. path='null' – Bobrovsky Dec 13 '13 at 9:15
  • @Bobrovsky I know this question is answered, but you can use system environment variables or the gradle.properties file. You are probably wanting to use the gradle.properties file. You can use it for multiple projects. – Jared Burrows Dec 21 '14 at 4:12
  • 3
    this doesn't work on MacOSX unless you run Android Studio from the command-line. – Henrique de Sousa Mar 30 '16 at 10:56
  • I agree with all above. I have the same configuration and you cannot compile this in Android studio. You need to run from command line for this to work. I am looking for a better way, so that I dont have to comment these lines when I run in Android Studio. – Sayooj Valsan May 11 '16 at 18:51

The accepted answer use a file to controls which keystore to use to sign the APK that resides in the same root folder of project. When we using vcs like Git, could be a bad thing when we forget to add the properties file to ignore list. Because we will disclose our password to the world. The problems still persist.

Instead making properties file in the same directory within our project, we should make it outside. We make it outside by using gradle.properties file.

Here the steps:

1.Edit or create gradle.properties on your root project and add the following code, remember to edit the path with your own:

AndroidProject.signing=/your/path/androidproject.properties  

2.Create androidproject.properties in /your/path/ and add the following code to it, don't forget to change /your/path/to/android.keystore to your keystore path:

STORE_FILE=/your/path/to/android.keystore  
STORE_PASSWORD=yourstorepassword  
KEY_ALIAS=yourkeyalias  
KEY_PASSWORD=yourkeypassword  

3.In your app module build.gradle (not your project root build.gradle) add the following code if not exist or adjust to it:

signingConfigs {  
     release  
   }  
   buildTypes {  
   debug {  
     debuggable true  
   }  
   release {  
     minifyEnabled true  
     proguardFiles getDefaultProguardFile('proguard-android.txt'), 'proguard-rules.pro'  
     signingConfig signingConfigs.release  
   }  
 }  

4.Add the following code below the code in step 3:

if (project.hasProperty("AndroidProject.signing")  
     && new File(project.property("AndroidProject.signing").toString()).exists()) {  
     def Properties props = new Properties()  
     def propFile = new File(project.property("AndroidProject.signing").toString())  
     if(propFile.canRead()) {  
      props.load(new FileInputStream(propFile))  
      if (props!=null && props.containsKey('STORE_FILE') && props.containsKey('STORE_PASSWORD') &&  
         props.containsKey('KEY_ALIAS') && props.containsKey('KEY_PASSWORD')) {  
         android.signingConfigs.release.storeFile = file(props['STORE_FILE'])  
         android.signingConfigs.release.storePassword = props['STORE_PASSWORD']  
         android.signingConfigs.release.keyAlias = props['KEY_ALIAS']  
         android.signingConfigs.release.keyPassword = props['KEY_PASSWORD']  
      } else {  
         println 'androidproject.properties found but some entries are missing'  
         android.buildTypes.release.signingConfig = null  
      }  
     } else {  
            println 'androidproject.properties file not found'  
          android.buildTypes.release.signingConfig = null  
     }  
   }  

This code will search for AndroidProject.signing property in gradle.properties from step 1. If the property found, it will translate property value as file path which pointing to androidproject.properties that we create in step 2. Then all the property value from it will be used as signing configuration for our build.gradle.

Now we don't need to worry again of risk of exposing our keystore password.

Read more at Signing Android apk without putting keystore info in build.gradle

For the ones looking to put their credentials in an external JSON file and read that from the gradle this is what I did:

my_project/credentials.json:

{
    "android": {
        "storeFile": "/path/to/acuity.jks",
        "storePassword": "your_store_password",
        "keyAlias": "your_android_alias",
        "keyPassword": "your_key_password"
    }
}

my_project/android/app/build.gradle

// ...
signingConfigs {
        release {

            def credsFilePath = file("../../credentials.json").toString()
            def credsFile = new File(credsFilePath, "").getText('UTF-8')
            def json = new groovy.json.JsonSlurper().parseText(credsFile)
            storeFile file(json.android.storeFile)
            storePassword = json.android.storePassword
            keyAlias = json.android.keyAlias
            keyPassword = json.android.keyPassword
        }
        ...
        buildTypes {
            release {
                signingConfig signingConfigs.release //I added this
                // ...
            }
        }
    }
// ...
}

The reason I chose a .json file type, and not a .properties file type (as in the accepted answer), is because I wanted to also store other data (other custom properties I needed) to that same file (my_project/credentials.json), and still have gradle parse the signing information from within that file as well.

  • Seems like the best solution to me. – Aspiring Dev Jul 15 at 22:43

It is possible to take any existing Android Studio gradle project and build/sign it from the command line without editing any files. This makes it very nice for storing your project in version control while keeping your keys and passwords separate and not in your build.gradle file:

./gradlew assembleRelease -Pandroid.injected.signing.store.file=$KEYFILE -Pandroid.injected.signing.store.password=$STORE_PASSWORD -Pandroid.injected.signing.key.alias=$KEY_ALIAS -Pandroid.injected.signing.key.password=$KEY_PASSWORD

This question has received many valid answers, but I wanted to share my code which may be useful for library maintainers, because it leaves the original build.gradle quite clean.

I add a folder to the module directory which I gitignore. It looks like this:

/signing
    /keystore.jks
    /signing.gradle
    /signing.properties

keystore.jks and signing.properties should be self explanatory. And signing.gradle looks like this:

def propsFile = file('signing/signing.properties')
def buildType = "release"

if (!propsFile.exists()) throw new IllegalStateException("signing/signing.properties file missing")

def props = new Properties()
props.load(new FileInputStream(propsFile))

def keystoreFile = file("signing/keystore.jks")
if (!keystoreFile.exists()) throw new IllegalStateException("signing/keystore.jks file missing")

android.signingConfigs.create(buildType, {
    storeFile = keystoreFile
    storePassword = props['storePassword']
    keyAlias = props['keyAlias']
    keyPassword = props['keyPassword']
})

android.buildTypes[buildType].signingConfig = android.signingConfigs[buildType]

And the original build.gradle

apply plugin: 'com.android.application'
if (project.file('signing/signing.gradle').exists()) {
    apply from: 'signing/signing.gradle'
}

android {
    compileSdkVersion 27
    defaultConfig {
        applicationId ...
    }
}

dependencies {
    implementation ...
}

As you can see, you don't have to specify the buildTypes at all, if user has access to a valid signing directory, he just puts it in the module and he can build a valid signed release application, otherwise it just works for him like it would normally do.

You can request passwords from the command line:

...

signingConfigs {
  if (gradle.startParameter.taskNames.any {it.contains('Release') }) {
    release {
      storeFile file("your.keystore")
      storePassword new String(System.console().readPassword("\n\$ Enter keystore password: "))
      keyAlias "key-alias"
      keyPassword new String(System.console().readPassword("\n\$ Enter keys password: "))
    } 
  } else {
    //Here be dragons: unreachable else-branch forces Gradle to create
    //install...Release tasks.
    release {
      keyAlias 'dummy'
      keyPassword 'dummy'
      storeFile file('dummy')
      storePassword 'dummy'
    } 
  }
}

...

buildTypes {
  release {

    ...

    signingConfig signingConfigs.release
  }

  ...
}

...

This answer previously appeared: https://stackoverflow.com/a/33765572/3664487

  • While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. - From Review – mkobit Nov 18 '15 at 17:23
  • 1
    @mkobit, this is a link to content on Stack Overflow! I could, of course, copy and paste the linked content, but that leads to duplicate content. Thus, I assume, and correct me if I am wrong, posting a link is the best solution. Any argument that "the linked page changes" should be dismissed, on the basis that the content here could change too. I strong recommend against your solution to delete! Because the linked content provides an excellent solution. – user2768 Nov 18 '15 at 17:28
  • Well, I think the problem is that this is still a "link-only" answer. I think the solution is to post it as a comment, flag the question as a duplicate, or write a new answer here that addresses the problem. – mkobit Nov 18 '15 at 17:31
  • "Link-only" answers should be encouraged in some instances. Nevertheless, I have followed your advice and duplicated content. (Duplicated content is clearly problematic, because some content might be updated, whereas the remaining content might not be.) – user2768 Nov 18 '15 at 17:34
  • Indeed, I have just updated the answer and duplicate content is causing problems! If there's a policy against link-only answers, then it should be adapted to consider such corner cases. – user2768 Nov 24 '15 at 16:14

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