97

What does this java code mean? Will it gain lock on all objects of MyClass?

synchronized(MyClass.class) {
   //is all objects of MyClass are thread-safe now ??
}

And how the above code differs from this one:

synchronized(this) {
   //is all objects of MyClass are thread-safe now ??
}
138

The snippet synchronized(X.class) uses the class instance as a monitor. As there is only one class instance (the object representing the class metadata at runtime) one thread can be in this block.

With synchronized(this) the block is guarded by the instance. For every instance only one thread may enter the block.

synchronized(X.class) is used to make sure that there is exactly one Thread in the block. synchronized(this) ensures that there is exactly one thread per instance. If this makes the actual code in the block thread-safe depends on the implementation. If mutate only state of the instance synchronized(this) is enough.

  • 6
    "as many threads may enter the block as there are instance" implies that the second form acts as a semaphore which is not true. You should say something like: "synchronised(this) ensures that only one thread can enter the block for a given instance of the class". – liwp Jan 13 '10 at 12:08
  • Corrected. I intended to say that. – Thomas Jung Jan 13 '10 at 12:23
  • 2
    what is the class instance vs the instance? – Weishi Zeng Jun 19 '16 at 9:09
  • So, if you have a static method and we don't want to synchronize all of its body, then we synchronized(this) is not good, instead synchronized(Foo.class) is appropriate. Is that right? – krupal.agile May 15 at 13:37
79

To add to the other answers:

static void myMethod() {
  synchronized(MyClass.class) {
    //code
  }
}

is equivalent to

static synchronized void myMethod() {
  //code
}

and

void myMethod() {
  synchronized(this) {
    //code
  }
}

is equivalent to

synchronized void myMethod() {
  //code
}
  • 10
    It took me a second reading to catch that the first two examples have the keyword "static". Just pointing that out to others who may have seen this and missed it. Without the static keyword the first two examples would not be the same. – kurtzbot Jul 24 '14 at 16:23
  • 1
    Those examples are NOT equivalent! The synchronized methods are "synchronized" as a hole when a thread tries to call the methods. The blocks on the other hand, can have code above and below them, that can get executed from multiple threads. They only synchronize within the block! That is not the same! – JacksOnF1re Mar 15 '18 at 15:31
  • public static Singleton getInstance() { if (instance == null) { synchronized (Singleton.class) { instance = new Singleton(); } } return instance; } – JacksOnF1re Mar 15 '18 at 15:32
  • 2
    The whole point is that there is no code outside the synchronized blocks. That makes them equivalent. If you change one example, they are indeed no longer the same. – Jorn Mar 15 '18 at 21:22
21

No, the first will get a lock on the class definition of MyClass, not all instances of it. However, if used in an instance, this will effectively block all other instances, since they share a single class definition.

The second will get a lock on the current instance only.

As to whether this makes your objects thread safe, that is a far more complex question - we'd need to see your code!

  • 1
    yes, MyClass.class could be any static variable and have the same effect. – pstanton Jan 13 '10 at 11:43

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