17

I'm trying to fill some local data resolving a series of remote calls.
When every promise is resolved, I load the data and proceed.

The method $q.all( [] ) does exactly this:

        $q.all([
            this.getUserInfo(11)
                .then(function (r) {
                    results.push(r)
                }),

            this.getUserConns()
                .then(function (r) {
                    results.push(r)
                }),

            this.getUserCtxs()
                .then(function (r) {
                    results.push(r)
                })
        ])
        .then(function () {
            console.log(results)
        })


Problem is, this code is not resilient.
If any of these call fails, nobody gets the fish!

Wrapping the calls in a try/catch statement, simply causes $q.all() to entirely ignore the entry, even when not failing (note the console.log in the func)...

        $q.all([
            this.getUserInfo2(11)
                .then(function (r) {
                    results.push(r)
                }),

            function () {
                try {
                    this.getUserGroups()
                        .then(function (r) {
                            console.log(r)
                            results.push(r)
                        })
                }
                catch (err) {
                    console.log(err)
                }
            },
        ])
        .then(function () {
            console.log(results)
        })

Output:

[Object]


Any hint on how I could wrap this to be resilient?


Thanks to @dtabuenc, I've gone one step further. Implementing the error callback, I can avoid the breaking of the chain, and push the values of the resolved promises.

However, a nasty Exception is still displayed on the console... How can I get rid of that if I cannot try/catch on async requests?

Caller code

    return $q.all([

            this.getUserInfo(user_id)
                .then(function (r) {
                    results['personal_details'] = r
                }),

            this.getUserConns()
                .then(
                    function (r) {
                    results['connections'] = r
                    },
                    function(err) {
                        console.log(err)
                    })

        ])
        .then(function () {
            return (results)
        })

Callee code (inject with an exception)

    getUserConns: function() {

        return __doCall( ws.getUserConnections, {} )
            .then( function(r) {

                // very generic exception injected
                throw new Error

                if (r && r.data['return_code'] === 0) {
                    return r.data['entries']
                }
                else {
                    console.log('unable to retrieve the activity - err: '+r.data['return_code'])
                    return null
                }
            })
    },

5 Answers 5

25

This will work but also push the errors to the array.

function push(r) {
    results.push(r);
}

$q.all([
    this.getUserInfo(11).then(push).catch(push),
    this.getUserConns().then(push).catch(push),
    this.getUserCtxs().then(push).catch(push)
])
.then(function () {
    console.log(results);
})

You should also improve your understanding of promises, you never should use try-catch with promises - when using promises, you use the .catch() method (with everything else being implicitly a try). This works for normal errors as well as asynchronous errors.


If you want to totally ignore the errors:

function push(r) {
    results.push(r);
}

function noop() {}

$q.all([
    this.getUserInfo(11).then(push).catch(noop),
    this.getUserConns().then(push).catch(noop),
    this.getUserCtxs().then(push).catch(noop)
])
.then(function () {
    console.log(results);
})
7
  • Actually, I'm still a newbie on Angular, promises and even JS, and I'm more than happy to learn new things every day! The .catch() method still doesn't "block" the exception I spawn on my last example, but I think it's the closest I can get to my ideal result. Thanks!
    – domokun
    Dec 16, 2013 at 10:18
  • 1
    @domokun angular promises incorrectly report even caught exceptions, violating the spirit of Promises/A+ if not violating spec
    – Esailija
    Dec 16, 2013 at 11:50
  • Good to know... I guess... Thx again!
    – domokun
    Dec 17, 2013 at 10:26
  • Amazing solution! I have tried many ways to get multiple failures from $q.all. This is the shortest and easy to understand solution I have seen so far. Thanks!
    – A-letubby
    Nov 28, 2014 at 7:39
  • 1
    In the above case it breaks the sequence of the output.
    – Aniket
    Jun 3, 2015 at 5:41
2

I think it's easier to do :

$q.all([
 mypromise1.$promise.catch(angular.noop),
 mypromise2.$promise.catch(angular.noop),
 mypromise1.$promise.catch(angular.noop)
])
.then(function success(data) {
 //.....
});
0

I'm not sure what you mean by resilient. What do you want to happen if one of the promises fails?

Your try-catch won't work because the promise will fail asynchronously.

You can however pass in an error handler as the second parameter to the then() call and do whatever you wish there.

4
  • Ok great, I forgot about the error callback. It's resilient in the sense that the chain doesn't get interrupted, and that is what I wanted. However, I cannot hide the exception if I don't catch it... I'll update my question to explain
    – domokun
    Dec 13, 2013 at 10:45
  • I don't think you can catch HTTP errors. They will always show up on the console. This is regardless of whether you are using angular or not. Dec 13, 2013 at 11:03
  • This is true, and doesn't bother me. What really bothers me is displaying an exception on the console. Please take a look at my updated question
    – domokun
    Dec 13, 2013 at 11:09
  • You can wrap it in a try/catch but it will only catch exceptions that happen within the thread. If the exception happens on the way back (for example coming back from an http request, a response to an event handler, or a setTimeout(), it will not catch it). Only way to catch those are in the code that handles the return. Dec 13, 2013 at 16:27
0

Same issue here. For those of you with for loops: inside a then response:

var tracks = [];
var trackDfds = [];
for(var i = 0; i < res.items.length; i++){
    var fn = function () {
        var promise = API.tracks(userId, res.items[i].id);
        return promise.then(function (res) {
            if (res.items.length) {
              tracks.push(res.items);
            }
        }).catch(angular.noop);
    };
    trackDfds.push(fn());
}
$q.all(trackDfds)
    .then(function (res) {
        console.log(tracks);
    });
0

@Esailija's answer seems like a workaround to a problem. You can't resolve the problem outside the main contributor to the problem: $q.

It seems a bit wiser to have reject callbacks for each then (2nd argument) and in there to insert $q.reject(...).

Example:

$q.all([
    this.getUserInfo(11).then(
        function (response) { // UI data preparation for this part of the screen }, 
        function (response) {
           $q.reject(response);
        }
    ),
    // ...
])
.then(
    function () {
      // all good
    },
    function () {
      // at least one failed
    }
)

This is particularly indicated when the UI model depends on all ajax calls.

Personally I think this is the safe way to proceed anyway, because most of the times you do want to push some server messages to some toast component on the reject callbacks, or alert the user in some way (queuing 7 ajax calls doesn't mean you can't show anything because 1 failed - it means you won't be able to show some region of the screen - that needs a specialized feedback to the user).

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