15

I am hosting a small testing website with Apache running on Linux, using free EC2 Micro instance.

When I tried to look at background process with "top", I saw a lot of (30+) "apache" user

PID    user     PR   NI VIRT RES   SHR S  %CPU %MEM  TIME+   COMMAND

12104 apache    20   0  429m 9024 2420 S  1.0  0.2   0:02.91  httpd              
12273 apache    20   0  429m 9108 2504 S  1.0  0.2   0:01.20  httpd              
...

I am not sure this is normal. Does this mean I may be attached by someone/virus?

P.S. I only expect 2-3 test users to use it at all at this point. It's a php + apache + mysql architect.

thanks.

  • 1
    Can you clarify a couple things: How small of a site? Would you expect dozens of users to be on the site or a few? How many is alot? 100s of apache processes or a dozen? – Dan Dec 13 '13 at 14:24
  • Also what language and Apache binding are you using? – Yam Marcovic Dec 13 '13 at 14:39
  • I only expect 2-3 test users to use it at all at this point. It's a php + apache + mysql architect. – Jason Dec 13 '13 at 14:40
  • What does your Apache config say about it? – Colin 't Hart Dec 13 '13 at 14:46
17

Apache will pre-create worker processes so, when a load spike comes in, the processes can pick up the requests immediately, instead of waiting for the master to spawn enough of them. Check your httpd.conf for MinSpareServers, MaxSpareServers and ServerLimit.

  • This makes sense. However, I changed the MaxSpareSevers to 12 (keep ServerLimit and MaxClient to 128), restart apache, but I am still seeing 30+ apache processes. Any thoughts? thanks! – Jason Dec 13 '13 at 20:32
  • 1
    Search your httpd config files for the string "server-status". The default config files have an example, commented out, of how the special URL your.server/server-status can give all kind of information about what the server, and the processes, are doing. Remove the comments, change the "accept from" part to allow access from your client (default denies to everywhere), restart your server, and check the special URL. A similar thing exists for server-info, but server-status has more information. – Guntram Blohm supports Monica Dec 13 '13 at 21:03

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