10

I wrote a batch file to launch an application (the application is not mine, I cannot modify it). The batch file itself accepts some parameters. The application accepts other parameters. The batch file consumes all of its options, using SHIFT, then launch the application with the correct environment and pass the remaining parameters to the application. Example of calling the batch file:

script.bat -opt-1 -opt-2 /opt-a /opt-b=value

In the example, "-opt-1" and "-opt-2" are consumed by script.bat. At the end, it must call the original application with the parameters "/opt-a" and "/opt-b=value". The "=" sign in the last parameter is expected by the application, I cannot change it. It works well when I call the application directly from the command line.

But when I call it from the script, the application receives 2 parameters for "/opt-b=value": both "/opt-b" and "value". If I use "%*" when I call the application, the "=" signs are preserved, but all parameters are passed (including the parameters skipped using SHIFT).

Is there any way to pass only the last parameters and preserve "=" signs?

  • Maybe you could use DOS's escape character: ^ – Corey Ogburn Dec 13 '13 at 17:27
  • I tried it, it does not work. Neither do " quotes or ' quotes. – Florent Georges Dec 13 '13 at 17:29
  • Perhaps you can post your script so people can copy and paste it, see what's wrong, and suggest a fix. – indiv Dec 13 '13 at 17:30
  • 1
    It is available at github.com/fgeorges/expath-pkg-java/blob/master/bin/…. At the very end, it uses %*, which works for preserving =, but it includes all the parameters skipped using shift (some parameters are consumed, starting line 230). – Florent Georges Dec 13 '13 at 17:32
5

Call your script.bat this way:

script.bat -opt-1 -opt-2 /opt-a "/opt-b=value"

and inside script.bat, call the application this way:

rem Consume -opt-1
shift
rem Consume -opt-2
shift
rem Call the application
application %1 %~2

EDIT: Response to the comments

Ok. Lets review this problem with detail.

The script.bat file below:

@echo off
rem Consume -opt-1
shift
rem Consume -opt-2
shift
rem Call the application
ECHO application %1 %~2

(please, note the ECHO command) correctly "call" the application with the second parameter including an equal-sign when its fourth parameter is enclosed in quotes, as the next screen output show:

C:\> script.bat -opt-1 -opt-2 /opt-a "/opt-b=value"
application /opt-a /opt-b=value

However, if the application IS A BATCH FILE, then it suffers from the same problem of the original script.bat file. You said that "It works well when I call the application directly from the command line". Well, this is not true:

C:\> type application.bat
@echo off
rem ** application.bat **
echo 1: %1
echo 2: %2
echo 3: %3
echo 4: %4 

C:\> application /opt-a /opt-b=value
1: /opt-a
2: /opt-b
3: value
4:

The parameters of a Batch file may be separated by comma, semicolon or equal-sign, besides spaces and tabs. This way, if "The "=" sign in the last parameter is expected by the application", then there is no way that the application be a Batch file and have no sense to test this method with a Batch file instead of the application.

Did you tested this solution with the real application?

  • Thank you! Unfortunately, when I try the above command with the following scripts: <pre> rem ** script.bat ** rem Consume -opt-1 shift rem Consume -opt-2 shift rem Call the application call %~dp0\application.bat %1 %~2 </pre> <pre> rem ** application.bat ** echo 1: %1 echo 2: %2 echo 3: %3 echo 4: %4 </pre> When called with script.bat -opt-1 -opt-2 /opt-a "/opt-b=value", the output is: <pre> 1: /opt-a 2: /opt-b 3: 4: </pre> instead of the expected (all I want it pass the parameters as they are): <pre> 1: /opt-a 2: /opt-b=value 3: 4: </pre> – Florent Georges Dec 16 '13 at 13:53
  • Sorry, I am not sure how to add a well-formatted comment, like yours above (by formatting properly the files as text blocks). The point is that your solution, as I tried it, passes /opt-b instead of /opt-b=value. – Florent Georges Dec 16 '13 at 13:55
  • @FlorentGeorges: I think there is a confusion here; read the edit in my answer... – Aacini Dec 16 '13 at 14:38
  • So there is differences between calling a batch file and someting else, then. I did not know that, sorry. Using application.bat was just as a quick way to test it (I wanted to isolate the problem). The real situation is this one: script.bat calls application (a "real" application, no a batch script), and is targeted at being used by final users, as a convenience script to launch the application "properly" and easily from the command line. Another project provides other.bat, which calls script.bat in order to launch application properly. – Florent Georges Dec 16 '13 at 17:10
  • So other.bat has to call script.bat, with /opt-b=value at the end, and this one has to be passed "as is" to application. – Florent Georges Dec 16 '13 at 17:12
1
FOR /f "tokens=1*" %%x IN ("%*") DO ECHO application %%y

where 1 is the number of parameters to skip.


Testing...main .bat (q20572424.bat)

@ECHO OFF
SETLOCAL
ECHO master[%*]
FOR /f "tokens=2*" %%x IN ("%*") DO CALL q20572424a.bat %%y
FOR /f "tokens=1*" %%x IN ("%*") DO CALL q20572424a.bat %%y
FOR /f "tokens=*" %%x IN ("%*") DO CALL q20572424a.bat %%x
GOTO :EOF

Subsidiary .bat (q20572424a.bat)

@ECHO OFF
SETLOCAL
ECHO slave=[%*]
FOR /f "tokens=2*" %%x IN ("%*") DO CALL q20572424b.bat %%y
FOR /f "tokens=1*" %%x IN ("%*") DO CALL q20572424b.bat %%y
FOR /f "tokens=*" %%x IN ("%*") DO CALL q20572424b.bat %%x
GOTO :EOF

Second subsidiary .bat (q20572424b.bat)

@ECHO OFF
SETLOCAL
ECHO subslave=[%*]
GOTO :EOF

Results:

From running q20572424 -opt-1 -opt-2 /opt-a /opt-b=value

master[-opt-1 -opt-2 /opt-a /opt-b=value]
slave=[/opt-a /opt-b=value]
subslave=[]
subslave=[/opt-b=value]
subslave=[/opt-a /opt-b=value]
slave=[-opt-2 /opt-a /opt-b=value]
subslave=[/opt-b=value]
subslave=[/opt-a /opt-b=value]
subslave=[-opt-2 /opt-a /opt-b=value]
slave=[-opt-1 -opt-2 /opt-a /opt-b=value]
subslave=[/opt-a /opt-b=value]
subslave=[-opt-2 /opt-a /opt-b=value]
subslave=[-opt-1 -opt-2 /opt-a /opt-b=value]

Which appears to be correct. In each case, the subsidiary batch receives the parameters verbatim; the number of leading parameters removed is 2,1,0 for each call.

W7HP - works for me!

  • Thank you! This indeed displays the correct answer with echo. But if you change echo by actually calling the application, e.g. call %~dp0\application.bat where application.bat displays its parameters, the result is: 1: /opt-a, 2: /opt-b, 3: value. So the last parameter has actually been split into 2... The expected result is rather: 1: /opt-a, 2: /opt-b=value. – Florent Georges Dec 16 '13 at 15:14
0

Taken from https://blogs.oracle.com/quinn/a-little-trick-with-windows-bat-scripts-argument-processing-and-equals-signs

:recurse
for /F "tokens=1*" %%a in ("%*") do (
  rem do something
  ...
  if NOT x%%b==x call :recurse %%b
)

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