6

I have the following function:

var checkCode=function(codeString){
  var ifs=codeString.split("if");
  ...
}

Is there a way to check if the code fails, as in does not find any if strings to split from in the codeString that is input to the function?

  • If if is not contained the length of ifs will be 1 – megawac Dec 14 '13 at 1:47
8

If the length of the result is 1, then the split didn't split.

| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    I'm trying really hard to think of a rhyme to go with this answer. – Pointy Dec 14 '13 at 1:53
  • 8
    If the length of the split is 1, then the split was never done @Pointy. – Zach Brantmeier Dec 17 '13 at 23:05
4

It will return an array with the whole string as the only entry.

if(codeString === ifs[0]) //nothing was split
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4

It looks like all you want is to check if the function splits and return a boolean state of that action. If so, here's a simple checker:

var canSplit = function(str, token){
    return (str || '').split(token).length > 1;         
}

and use as follows:

canSplit('test if this works', 'if'); // returns true

canSplit('test that this fails', 'if'); // returns false
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    In this case, instead of splitting the string, you could also use indexOf instead, which might be a tad faster. – Felix Kling Dec 14 '13 at 3:03
  • @FelixKling, agreed! wanted to stay in context, since this case is around .split(). performance would be a different topic but I agree indexOf is way faster. – SimoAmi Dec 18 '13 at 17:09
1

Try this:

 var checkCode=function(codeString){
      var ifs = codeString.split("if");
         if(ifs.length == 1){ alert('no split'); } 
         else{ alert('splitted'); }
         return ifs;
    }
var str = "dfsdfif";
checkCode(str);
| improve this answer | |
1

You can try includes method of String.prototype. Just like below example.

var your_var = codeString.includes("if");//return true or false

It returns true if a string contains specified character else returns false. According to true or false, you can take the decision if you want to split string or not.

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0

Old topic but it may help someone.

I would use a try catch

let ifs: string;
try {
  ifs = codeString.split("if");
} catch {
  // the code fails
}

And inside a function

var checkCode = function(codeString): string{
  try {
    return codeString.split("if");
  } catch {
    return null;
  }
}
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0

Using ES6 destructuring:

  const canSplit = (input = '', delimiter) => {
    const [, second] = input.split(delimiter) || ''
    return second !== undefined
  }

At first I wanted to use just return !!second but then canSplit("abc-", '-') would return false.

| improve this answer | |

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