23

I have a defaultObject like that:

var default = {
    abc: "123",
    def: "456",
    ghi: {
       jkl: "789",
       mno: "012"
    }
};

And I have another like:

var values = {
    abc: "zzz",
    ghi: {
       jkl: "yyy",
    }
};

How can I merge those 2 objects with the following result (no override)?

var values = {
    abc: "zzz",
    def: "456",
    ghi: {
       jkl: "yyy",
       mno: "012"
    }
};

(I don't want to change the default object!)

6 Answers 6

17

For those who don't use jQuery, here comes a vanilla-js solution.

Solution:

function extend (target) {
    for(var i=1; i<arguments.length; ++i) {
        var from = arguments[i];
        if(typeof from !== 'object') continue;
        for(var j in from) {
            if(from.hasOwnProperty(j)) {
                target[j] = typeof from[j]==='object'
                ? extend({}, target[j], from[j])
                : from[j];
            }
        }
    }
    return target;
}

Compressed (with Closure Compiler):

Only 199 characters!

var extend=function e(c){for(var d=1;d<arguments.length;++d){var a=arguments[d];if("object"===typeof a)for(var b in a)a.hasOwnProperty(b)&&(c[b]="object"===typeof a[b]?e({},c[b],a[b]):a[b])}return c}

How to use:

extend(target, obj1, obj2); // returns target

If you only want to merge, use

var merged = extend({}, obj1, obj2);

Features:

  • It doesn't look at objects' prototype.
  • Ignores non-objects.
  • It is recursive in order to merge properties which are objects.
  • Objects referenced in target's properties, if extended, are replaced by new ones, and the original ones are not modified.
  • In case of same property names, the merged value will be the merging of the objects after the last (in the order of arguments) non-object value. Or, if the last isn't an object, itself.

Examples:

extend({}, {a:1}, {a:2});            // {a:2}
extend({}, {a:1}, {b:2});            // {a:1, b:2}
extend({}, {a: {b:1}}, {a: {b:2}});  // {a: {b:2}}
extend({}, {a: {b:1}}, {a: {c:2}});  // {a: {b:2, c:2}}
extend({}, {a: {a:1}}, {a: {b:2}}, {a: 'whatever non object'});
    // {a: "whatever non object"}
extend({}, {a: {a:1}}, {a: {b:2}}, {a: 'whatever non object'}, {a: {c:3}},{a: {d:4}});
    // {a: {c:3, d:4}}

Warning:

Be aware that if browser is not clever enough, it could be trapped in an infinite loop:

var obj1={},
    obj2={};
obj1.me=obj1;
obj2.me=obj2;
extend({},obj1,obj2);

If the browser is clever enough, it can throw an error, or return {me: undefined}, or whatever.

Note that this warning also applies if you use jQuery's $.extend.

1
  • One problem. It converts arrays to objects. Aug 30, 2022 at 14:20
13

With ES2015 now being supported in all modern browsers, the native Object.assign can be used to extend objects

Object.assign({}, _default, values)

Object.assign

Note that default is a reserved keyword, and can't be used as a variable name


The original answer, written in 2013 :

Since this is tagged with jQuery, you could use $.extend for a simple cross-browser solution

var temp = {};
$.extend(true, temp, _default, values);
values = temp;

4
  • But this will change my default 'default_array' and I don't want it, because it is a global variable...
    – amp
    Dec 15, 2013 at 1:21
  • 2
    @amp - that's easily avoided by using a temporary object.
    – adeneo
    Dec 15, 2013 at 1:29
  • 8
    This doesn't work, ghi will be overwritten, not merged together.
    – Nate
    Jun 12, 2019 at 4:04
  • yes, existing objects are being removed inside nested json Jun 2, 2021 at 16:42
8

Also if you are happy with ES6:

Object.assign({}, default, values)
1
  • 4
    Still overrides if value exist in default May 27, 2021 at 7:45
3

Another way would be to simply extend value by default (instead of the other way around which would override default)

Object.assign(value, default) // values of default overrides value
default = value // reset default to value

The caveat here is that the content of value is changed as well. Upside is no library is required and easier than the plain vanilla solution above.

3

My version based on Oriol's answer adds a check for arrays, so that arrays don't get transformed into funny {'0': ..., '1': ...} thingys

function extend (target) {
  for(var i=1; i<arguments.length; ++i) {
    var from = arguments[i];
    if(typeof from !== 'object') continue;
    for(var j in from) {
      if(from.hasOwnProperty(j)) {
        target[j] = typeof from[j]==='object' && !Array.isArray(from[j])
          ? extend({}, target[j], from[j])
          : from[j];
      }
    }
  }
  return target;
}
1

I found that the easiest way to to this is to use mergeWith() from lodash ( https://lodash.com/docs/4.17.15#mergeWith ) which accepts a customizer function that decides what to do with every property merge. Here is one that is recursive :

const mergeFunction = (objValue, srcValue) => {
  if (typeof srcValue === 'object') {
    _.mergeWith(objValue, srcValue, mergeFunction)
  } else if (objValue) {
    return objValue
  } else {
    return srcValue
  }
}

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