45

I use the following code to temporarily modify environment variables.

@contextmanager
def _setenv(**mapping):
    """``with`` context to temporarily modify the environment variables"""
    backup_values = {}
    backup_remove = set()
    for key, value in mapping.items():
        if key in os.environ:
            backup_values[key] = os.environ[key]
        else:
            backup_remove.add(key)
        os.environ[key] = value

    try:
        yield
    finally:
        # restore old environment
        for k, v in backup_values.items():
            os.environ[k] = v
        for k in backup_remove:
            del os.environ[k]

This with context is mainly used in test cases. For example,

def test_myapp_respects_this_envvar():
    with _setenv(MYAPP_PLUGINS_DIR='testsandbox/plugins'):
        myapp.plugins.register()
        [...]

My question: is there a simple/elegant way to write _setenv? I thought about actually doing backup = os.environ.copy() and then os.environ = backup .. but I am not sure if that would affect the program behavior (eg: if os.environ is referenced elsewhere in the Python interpreter).

55

I suggest you the following implementation:

import contextlib
import os


@contextlib.contextmanager
def set_env(**environ):
    """
    Temporarily set the process environment variables.

    >>> with set_env(PLUGINS_DIR=u'test/plugins'):
    ...   "PLUGINS_DIR" in os.environ
    True

    >>> "PLUGINS_DIR" in os.environ
    False

    :type environ: dict[str, unicode]
    :param environ: Environment variables to set
    """
    old_environ = dict(os.environ)
    os.environ.update(environ)
    try:
        yield
    finally:
        os.environ.clear()
        os.environ.update(old_environ)

EDIT: more advanced implementation

The context manager below can be used to add/remove/update your environment variables:

import contextlib
import os


@contextlib.contextmanager
def modified_environ(*remove, **update):
    """
    Temporarily updates the ``os.environ`` dictionary in-place.

    The ``os.environ`` dictionary is updated in-place so that the modification
    is sure to work in all situations.

    :param remove: Environment variables to remove.
    :param update: Dictionary of environment variables and values to add/update.
    """
    env = os.environ
    update = update or {}
    remove = remove or []

    # List of environment variables being updated or removed.
    stomped = (set(update.keys()) | set(remove)) & set(env.keys())
    # Environment variables and values to restore on exit.
    update_after = {k: env[k] for k in stomped}
    # Environment variables and values to remove on exit.
    remove_after = frozenset(k for k in update if k not in env)

    try:
        env.update(update)
        [env.pop(k, None) for k in remove]
        yield
    finally:
        env.update(update_after)
        [env.pop(k) for k in remove_after]

Usage examples:

>>> with modified_environ('HOME', LD_LIBRARY_PATH='/my/path/to/lib'):
...     home = os.environ.get('HOME')
...     path = os.environ.get("LD_LIBRARY_PATH")
>>> home is None
True
>>> path
'/my/path/to/lib'

>>> home = os.environ.get('HOME')
>>> path = os.environ.get("LD_LIBRARY_PATH")
>>> home is None
False
>>> path is None
True

EDIT2

A demonstration of this context manager is available on GitHub.

3
  • 7
    For visitors to this old question, I don't see any obvious flaws in this answer and it is more complete and useful than the original.
    – KobeJohn
    Sep 14 '16 at 23:45
  • 1
    This should be part of python - or something. Messing with the environment for testing is nasty - but sometimes necessary - stuff and can severely break, invalidate or otherwise fnord tests lying downstream of env-messing test-functions :(
    – Chris
    Aug 24 '17 at 11:34
  • In which scenarios, would the first method not work?
    – pmav99
    Jan 30 '19 at 17:19
39
_environ = dict(os.environ)  # or os.environ.copy()
try:

    ...

finally:
    os.environ.clear()
    os.environ.update(_environ)
2
  • 2
    Good. I am using .copy() instead of dict() though. Jan 13 '10 at 19:21
  • 3
    Ok, but in case of failure (exception) during [...], environment variables are not restored: a try ... finally ... is required for that. Aug 8 '16 at 16:20
19

I was looking to do the same thing but for unit testing, here is how I have done it using the unittest.mock.patch function:

def test_function_with_different_env_variable():
    with mock.patch.dict('os.environ', {'hello': 'world'}, clear=True):
        self.assertEqual(os.environ.get('hello'), 'world')
        self.assertEqual(len(os.environ), 1)

Basically using unittest.mock.patch.dict with clear=True, we are making os.environ as a dictionary containing solely {'hello': 'world'}.

  • Removing the clear=True will let the original os.environ and add/replace the specified key/value pair inside {'hello': 'world'}.

  • Removing {'hello': 'world'} will just create an empty dictionary, os.envrion will thus be empty within the with.

1
  • 2
    Many Thanks @sylhare and @NathanielFord! This was the only place where I found the info on how to delete keys from a dict while mocking. Setting a value to None throws an error - it has to be a string
    – mb_atx
    Sep 22 '20 at 21:26
4

In pytest you can temporarily set an environment variable using the monkeypatch fixture. See the docs for details. I've copied a snippet here for your convenience.

import os
import pytest
from typing import Any, NewType

# Alias for the ``type`` of monkeypatch fixture.
MonkeyPatchFixture = NewType("MonkeyPatchFixture", Any)


# This is the function we will test below to demonstrate the ``monkeypatch`` fixture.
def get_lowercase_env_var(env_var_name: str) -> str:
    """
    Return the value of an environment variable. Variable value is made all lowercase.

    :param env_var_name:
        The name of the environment variable to return.
    :return:
        The value of the environment variable, with all letters in lowercase.
    """
    env_variable_value = os.environ[env_var_name]
    lowercase_env_variable = env_variable_value.lower()
    return lowercase_env_variable


def test_get_lowercase_env_var(monkeypatch: MonkeyPatchFixture) -> None:
    """
    Test that the function under test indeed returns the lowercase-ified
    form of ENV_VAR_UNDER_TEST.
    """
    name_of_env_var_under_test = "ENV_VAR_UNDER_TEST"
    env_var_value_under_test = "EnvVarValue"
    expected_result = "envvarvalue"
    # KeyError because``ENV_VAR_UNDER_TEST`` was looked up in the os.environ dictionary before its value was set by ``monkeypatch``.
    with pytest.raises(KeyError):
        assert get_lowercase_env_var(name_of_env_var_under_test) == expected_result
    # Temporarily set the environment variable's value.
    monkeypatch.setenv(name_of_env_var_under_test, env_var_value_under_test)
    assert get_lowercase_env_var(name_of_env_var_under_test) == expected_result


def test_get_lowercase_env_var_fails(monkeypatch: MonkeyPatchFixture) -> None:
    """
    This demonstrates that ENV_VAR_UNDER_TEST is reset in every test function.
    """
    env_var_name_under_test = "ENV_VAR_UNDER_TEST"
    expected_result = "envvarvalue"
    with pytest.raises(KeyError):
        assert get_lowercase_env_var(env_var_name_under_test) == expected_result
1
  • Hmm, that example was pretty terrible wasn't it. I updated the code with something that I think is much more helpful. Let me know if you like the new version. (Both tests pass). Nov 4 '19 at 15:31
2

For unit testing I prefer using a decorator function with optional parameters. This way I can use the modified environment values for a whole test function. The decorator below also restores the original environment values in case the function raises an Exception:

import os

def patch_environ(new_environ=None, clear_orig=False):
    if not new_environ:
        new_environ = dict()

    def actual_decorator(func):
        from functools import wraps

        @wraps(func)
        def wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
            original_env = dict(os.environ)

            if clear_orig:
                os.environ.clear()

            os.environ.update(new_environ)
            try:
                result = func(*args, **kwargs)
            except:
                raise
            finally: # restore even if Exception was raised
                os.environ = original_env

            return result

        return wrapper

    return actual_decorator

Usage in unit tests:

class Something:
    @staticmethod
    def print_home():
        home = os.environ.get('HOME', 'unknown')
        print("HOME = {0}".format(home))


class SomethingTest(unittest.TestCase):
    @patch_environ({'HOME': '/tmp/test'})
    def test_environ_based_something(self):
        Something.print_home() # prints: HOME = /tmp/test

unittest.main()
0

Using the gist here, you can save/restore local, global scope variable and environment variables: https://gist.github.com/earonesty/ac0617a5672ae1a41be1eaf316dd63e4

import os
from varlib import vartemp, envtemp

x = 3
y = 4

with vartemp({'x':93,'y':94}):
   print(x)
   print(y)
print(x)
print(y)

with envtemp({'foo':'bar'}):
    print(os.getenv('foo'))

print(os.getenv('foo'))

This outputs:

93
94
3
4
bar
None

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