2

Below is my comma separated input.txt file, i want to read the columns and write the lines in to the output.txt when any 1 column has a space.

Content of input.txt:

1,Hello,world
2,worl d,hell o
3,h e l l o, world
4,Hello_Hello,World@c#
5,Hello,W orld

Content of output.txt:

1,Hello,world
4,Hello_Hello,World@c#

is't possible to achieve using awk? Please help!

  • Why use awk when grep -v will do just fine ? – UltraInstinct Dec 15 '13 at 19:07
  • 3
    is't - the strangest spelling error I've seen this year. I swear. – user529758 Dec 15 '13 at 19:11
  • 2
    Updating the question with a game-changing additional requirement after you have received multiple substantial answers is not good form. I would be tempted to suggest to revert the edit, accept an answer, and post a new question. – tripleee Dec 15 '13 at 19:39
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    @H2CO3: en.wiktionary.org/wiki/is't – Ry- Dec 15 '13 at 20:05
  • 2
    @minitech I know (seen Twitter?), but I still consider it a mistake. Seriously. – user529758 Dec 15 '13 at 20:07
12

A simple way to filter out lines with spaces is using inverted matching with grep:

grep -v ' ' input.txt 

If you must use awk:

awk '!/ /' input.txt 

Or perl:

perl -ne '/ / || print' input.txt 

Or pure bash:

while read line; do [[ $line == *' '* ]] || echo $line; done < input.txt
# or
while read line; do [[ $line =~ ' ' ]] || echo $line; done < input.txt

UPDATE

To check if let's say field 2 contains space, you could use awk like this:

awk -F, '$2 !~ / /' input.txt

To check if let's say field 2 OR field 3 contains space:

awk -F, '!($2 ~ / / || $3 ~ / /)' input.txt

For your follow-up question in comments

To do the same using sed, I only know these awkward solutions:

# remove lines if 2nd field contains space
sed -e '/^[^,]*,[^,]* /d' input.txt 
# remove lines if 2nd or 3rd field contains space
sed -e '/^[^,]*,[^,]* /d' -e '/^[^,]*,[^,]*,[^,]* /d' input.txt 

For your 2nd follow-up question in comments

To disregard leading spaces in the 2nd or 3rd fields:

awk -F', *' '!($2 ~ / / || $3 ~ / /)' input.txt
# or perhaps what you really want is this:
awk -F', *' -v OFS=, '!($2 ~ / / || $3 ~ / /) { print $1, $2, $3 }' input.txt
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    You don't need { print } since it's the default action for awk. – stark Dec 15 '13 at 19:13
  • Thanks @Jason for the awk. how to change the awk in order to check for one or two fields alone? – Marjer Dec 15 '13 at 19:23
  • awk -F, '$2 !~ / /' this fails for 5,Hello,W orld, since you only test for two fields, and there are more than two – Jotne Dec 15 '13 at 19:29
  • Thanks @janos for the OR in awk. it is possible to write same command using sed? just curious – Marjer Dec 15 '13 at 19:39
  • @janos this cmd '$2 !~ / /' is considering leading and trailing zero's also. anyways to remove them? – Marjer Dec 15 '13 at 22:19
5

This can also be done easily with

sed '/ /d' input.txt
| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks but my problem is, i want to check for a particular column. I missed to add that in the Question. – Marjer Dec 15 '13 at 19:24
3

try this one-liner

awk 'NF==1' file

as @jwpat7 pointed out, it won't give correct output if the line has only leading space, then this line, with regex should do, but it has been already posted in janos's answer.

awk '!/ /' file

or

awk -F' *' 'NF==1'
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    I would +1 if this worked ... but it fails when the disqualifying spaces are at front of line – James Waldby - jwpat7 Dec 15 '13 at 19:14
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    Pretty neat, but pretty obscure. Awk splits on whitespace and sets NF to the number of fields; if it is one, there was no whitespace to split on. – tripleee Dec 15 '13 at 19:16
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    @jwpat7 you are correct, of course; but the OP's examples suggest this may not be a problem. – tripleee Dec 15 '13 at 19:19
1

Pure bash for the fun of it...

#!/bin/bash

while read line
do
    if [[ ! $line =~ " " ]]
    then
        echo $line
    fi
done < input.txt
| improve this answer | |
0
columnWithSpace=2
ColumnBef=$(( ${columnWithSpace} - 1 ))

sed '/\([^,]*,\)\{${ColumnBef\}[^ ,]* [^,]*,/ d'

if you know the column directly (by example the 3):

sed '/\([^,]*,\)\{2}[^ ,]* [^,]*,/ d'
| improve this answer | |
0

If you can trust the input to always have no more than three fields, simply finding a space somewhere after a comma is sufficient.

grep ',.* ' input.txt

If there can be (or usually are) more fields, you can pull that off with grep -E and a suitable ERE, but you are fast approaching the point at which the equivalent Awk solution will be more readable and maintainable.

| improve this answer | |

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