Digital camera photos are often saved as JPEG with an EXIF "orientation" tag. To display correctly, images need to be rotated/mirrored depending on which orientation is set, but browsers ignore this information rendering the image. Even in large commerical web apps, support for EXIF orientation can be spotty 1. The same source also provides a nice summary of the 8 different orientations a JPEG can have:

Summary of EXIF Orientations

Sample images are available at 4.

The question is how to rotate/mirror the image on the client side so that it displays correctly and can be further processed if necessary?

There are JS libraries available to parse EXIF data, including the orientation attribute 2. Flickr noted possible performance problem when parsing large images, requiring use of webworkers 3.

Console tools can correctly re-orient the images 5. A PHP script solving the problem is available at 6

up vote 112 down vote accepted

The github project JavaScript-Load-Image provides a complete solution to the EXIF orientation problem, correctly rotating/mirroring images for all 8 exif orientations. See the online demo of javascript exif orientation

The image is drawn onto an HTML5 canvas. Its correct rendering is implemented in js/load-image-orientation.js through canvas operations.

Hope this saves somebody else some time, and teaches the search engines about this open source gem :)

  • I have been using this library but recently it broke on iOS 8.3 which is where I need it to work most :( – Gordon Sun Jul 14 '15 at 5:31
  • 1
    I'm really struggling to see how this is helpful. I'm playing around with it trying to learn it so I can either parse a page and rotate images when they need to be rotated, or detect orientation and rotate file (somehow) before actually uploading it. The demo does neither. It simply takes a file from a file input and displays it the right way, when is this useful in the real world? When I parse my page and feed the URLs from the image tags into the loadImage library there is no exif data so can't do that. For the upload it returns a canvas object so I can't send that to the server or anything. – igneosaur May 20 '16 at 8:28
  • 2
    @igneosaur: you can send base64 encoded data to the server with canvas.toDataURL() and decode and save it server side. – brannigan May 30 '16 at 9:34
  • 1
    rather than use the load-image project, you can use some of its code-base to bake your own - just look in github.com/blueimp/JavaScript-Load-Image/blob/master/js/…. – Andy Lorenz Jun 10 '16 at 13:54
  • 1
    Is there any way to make the canvas that this library produces responsive like a regular <img> tag? – Erik Berkun-Drevnig Sep 14 '16 at 18:26

Mederr's context transform works perfectly. If you need to extract orientation only use this function - you don't need any EXIF-reading libs. Below is a function for re-setting orientation in base64 image. Here's a fiddle for it. I've also prepared a fiddle with orientation extraction demo.

function resetOrientation(srcBase64, srcOrientation, callback) {
  var img = new Image();    

  img.onload = function() {
    var width = img.width,
        height = img.height,
        canvas = document.createElement('canvas'),
        ctx = canvas.getContext("2d");

    // set proper canvas dimensions before transform & export
    if (4 < srcOrientation && srcOrientation < 9) {
      canvas.width = height;
      canvas.height = width;
    } else {
      canvas.width = width;
      canvas.height = height;
    }

    // transform context before drawing image
    switch (srcOrientation) {
      case 2: ctx.transform(-1, 0, 0, 1, width, 0); break;
      case 3: ctx.transform(-1, 0, 0, -1, width, height); break;
      case 4: ctx.transform(1, 0, 0, -1, 0, height); break;
      case 5: ctx.transform(0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0); break;
      case 6: ctx.transform(0, 1, -1, 0, height, 0); break;
      case 7: ctx.transform(0, -1, -1, 0, height, width); break;
      case 8: ctx.transform(0, -1, 1, 0, 0, width); break;
      default: break;
    }

    // draw image
    ctx.drawImage(img, 0, 0);

    // export base64
    callback(canvas.toDataURL());
  };

  img.src = srcBase64;
};
  • 4
    The default case in the orientation switch is not needed, since that transformation doesn't do anything. Also, consider using srcOrientation > 4 && srcOrientation < 9 instead of [5,6,7,8].indexOf(srcOrientation) > -1, because it's faster and less resource intensive (both RAM & CPU). There's no need to have an array there. This is important when batching lots of images, where every bit count. Otherwise, pretty good answer. Upvoted! – Ryan Casas Aug 14 '17 at 8:42
  • 3
    @RyanCasas I wasn't aware of how heavy can indexOf be comparing to what you proposed. I ran a simple loop with 10M iterations and it was 1400% faster. Nice :D Thanks a bunch! – WunderBart Aug 15 '17 at 13:31
  • This is a great answer. Much tighter than the accepted answer. You can make this faster by testing the orientation before rotating, because if it is the right way around, there is no need to do anything. In my case this is 75% of all images. I have added an example as an answer which includes an integration of both the getorientation and resetorientation functions – statler Oct 30 '17 at 10:19
  • I used this answer in a Android WebView and it turned out, that there are some Android devices, that don't support WebGL within a WebView (see bugs.chromium.org/p/chromium/issues/detail?id=555116) The rotation can take very long on such devices depending on the size of the image. – ndreisg Mar 27 at 14:31

If

width = img.width;
height = img.height;
var ctx = canvas.getContext('2d');

Then you can use these transformations to turn the image to orientation 1

From orientation:

  1. ctx.transform(1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0);
  2. ctx.transform(-1, 0, 0, 1, width, 0);
  3. ctx.transform(-1, 0, 0, -1, width, height);
  4. ctx.transform(1, 0, 0, -1, 0, height);
  5. ctx.transform(0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0);
  6. ctx.transform(0, 1, -1, 0, height, 0);
  7. ctx.transform(0, -1, -1, 0, height, width);
  8. ctx.transform(0, -1, 1, 0, 0, width);

Before drawing the image on ctx

  • 30
    what is even happening in here? – Muhammad Umer Mar 27 '16 at 14:44
  • 1
    With this you just need to know the orientation (e.g. via EXIF) and then rotate as needed. Half of what I am looking for. – Brenden Apr 26 '16 at 5:59
  • 2
    these transformations didn't work for me - instead I used the code from the load-image project at github.com/blueimp/JavaScript-Load-Image/blob/master/js/… to get what I believe is well-proven code which uses both translate, rotate operations on the canvas context plus a width/height swap. Gave me 100% results after many hours of experimentation with other attempts at transforming etc – Andy Lorenz Jun 10 '16 at 13:57
  • Why does it matter when you draw the image on ctx? You can't rotate the canvas after drawing an image on it? – AlxVallejo Dec 5 '17 at 17:39

ok in addition to @user3096626 answer i think it will be more helpful if someone provided code example, the following example will show you how to fix image orientation comes from url (remote images):


Solution 1: using javascript (recommended)

  1. because load-image library doesn't extract exif tags from url images only (file/blob), we will use both exif-js and load-image javascript libraries, so first add these libraries to your page as the follow:

    <script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/exif-js/2.1.0/exif.min.js"></script>
    <script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/blueimp-load-image/2.12.2/load-image.min.js"></script>
    <script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/blueimp-load-image/2.12.2/load-image-scale.min.js"></script>
    <script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/blueimp-load-image/2.12.2/load-image-orientation.min.js"></script>
    

    Note the version 2.2 of exif-js seems has issues so we used 2.1

  2. then basically what we will do is

    a - load the image using window.loadImage()

    b - read exif tags using window.EXIF.getData()

    c - convert the image to canvas and fix the image orientation using window.loadImage.scale()

    d - place the canvas into the document

here you go :)

window.loadImage("/your-image.jpg", function (img) {
  if (img.type === "error") {
    console.log("couldn't load image:", img);
  } else {
    window.EXIF.getData(img, function () {
        var orientation = EXIF.getTag(this, "Orientation");
        var canvas = window.loadImage.scale(img, {orientation: orientation || 0, canvas: true});
        document.getElementById("container").appendChild(canvas); 
        // or using jquery $("#container").append(canvas);

    });
  }
});

of course also you can get the image as base64 from the canvas object and place it in the img src attribute, so using jQuery you can do ;)

$("#my-image").attr("src",canvas.toDataURL());

here is the full code on: github: https://github.com/digital-flowers/loadimage-exif-example


Solution 2: using html (browser hack)

there is a very quick and easy hack, most browsers display the image in the right orientation if the image is opened inside a new tab directly without any html (LOL i don't know why), so basically you can display your image using iframe by putting the iframe src attribute as the image url directly:

<iframe src="/my-image.jpg"></iframe>

Solution 3: using css (only firefox & safari on ios)

there is css3 attribute to fix image orientation but the problem it is only working on firefox and safari/ios it is still worth mention because soon it will be available for all browsers (Browser support info from caniuse)

img {
   image-orientation: from-image;
}
  • Solution 1 did not work for me. It's returning window.loadImage is undefined – Perry Jul 8 '17 at 14:56
  • This happened if you didn't include the libraries I mention in step 1 – Fareed Alnamrouti Jul 8 '17 at 15:00
  • I included the libraries. I like the simplicity of your example but I keep getting that error message. – Perry Jul 8 '17 at 15:23
  • 1
    it seems exif-js was broken, please check my edit i also have added full code on github: github.com/digital-flowers/loadimage-exif-example – Fareed Alnamrouti Jul 8 '17 at 16:34
  • 1
    ok checkout the github project there is a new file "upload.html", you are welcome :) – Fareed Alnamrouti Jul 8 '17 at 18:05

WunderBart's answer was the best for me. Note that you can speed it up a lot if your images are often the right way around, simply by testing the orientation first and bypassing the rest of the code if no rotation is required.

Putting all of the info from wunderbart together, something like this;

var handleTakePhoto = function () {
    let fileInput: HTMLInputElement = <HTMLInputElement>document.getElementById('photoInput');
    fileInput.addEventListener('change', (e: any) => handleInputUpdated(fileInput, e.target.files));
    fileInput.click();
}

var handleInputUpdated = function (fileInput: HTMLInputElement, fileList) {
    let file = null;

    if (fileList.length > 0 && fileList[0].type.match(/^image\//)) {
        isLoading(true);
        file = fileList[0];
        getOrientation(file, function (orientation) {
            if (orientation == 1) {
                imageBinary(URL.createObjectURL(file));
                isLoading(false);
            }
            else 
            {
                resetOrientation(URL.createObjectURL(file), orientation, function (resetBase64Image) {
                    imageBinary(resetBase64Image);
                    isLoading(false);
                });
            }
        });
    }

    fileInput.removeEventListener('change');
}


// from http://stackoverflow.com/a/32490603
export function getOrientation(file, callback) {
    var reader = new FileReader();

    reader.onload = function (event: any) {
        var view = new DataView(event.target.result);

        if (view.getUint16(0, false) != 0xFFD8) return callback(-2);

        var length = view.byteLength,
            offset = 2;

        while (offset < length) {
            var marker = view.getUint16(offset, false);
            offset += 2;

            if (marker == 0xFFE1) {
                if (view.getUint32(offset += 2, false) != 0x45786966) {
                    return callback(-1);
                }
                var little = view.getUint16(offset += 6, false) == 0x4949;
                offset += view.getUint32(offset + 4, little);
                var tags = view.getUint16(offset, little);
                offset += 2;

                for (var i = 0; i < tags; i++)
                    if (view.getUint16(offset + (i * 12), little) == 0x0112)
                        return callback(view.getUint16(offset + (i * 12) + 8, little));
            }
            else if ((marker & 0xFF00) != 0xFF00) break;
            else offset += view.getUint16(offset, false);
        }
        return callback(-1);
    };

    reader.readAsArrayBuffer(file.slice(0, 64 * 1024));
};

export function resetOrientation(srcBase64, srcOrientation, callback) {
    var img = new Image();

    img.onload = function () {
        var width = img.width,
            height = img.height,
            canvas = document.createElement('canvas'),
            ctx = canvas.getContext("2d");

        // set proper canvas dimensions before transform & export
        if (4 < srcOrientation && srcOrientation < 9) {
            canvas.width = height;
            canvas.height = width;
        } else {
            canvas.width = width;
            canvas.height = height;
        }

        // transform context before drawing image
        switch (srcOrientation) {
            case 2: ctx.transform(-1, 0, 0, 1, width, 0); break;
            case 3: ctx.transform(-1, 0, 0, -1, width, height); break;
            case 4: ctx.transform(1, 0, 0, -1, 0, height); break;
            case 5: ctx.transform(0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0); break;
            case 6: ctx.transform(0, 1, -1, 0, height, 0); break;
            case 7: ctx.transform(0, -1, -1, 0, height, width); break;
            case 8: ctx.transform(0, -1, 1, 0, 0, width); break;
            default: break;
        }

        // draw image
        ctx.drawImage(img, 0, 0);

        // export base64
        callback(canvas.toDataURL());
    };

    img.src = srcBase64;
}
  • 1
    Great approach. You should also consider handling the -2 and -1 return from getOrientation so you don't try to rotate non-jpgs or images without rotation data. – Steven Lambert Jun 14 at 20:10

For those who have a file from an input control, don't know what its orientation is, are a bit lazy and don't want to include a large library below is the code provided by @WunderBart melded with the answer he links to (https://stackoverflow.com/a/32490603) that finds the orientation.

function getDataUrl(file, callback2) {
        var callback = function (srcOrientation) {
            var reader2 = new FileReader();
            reader2.onload = function (e) {
                var srcBase64 = e.target.result;
                var img = new Image();

                img.onload = function () {
                    var width = img.width,
                        height = img.height,
                        canvas = document.createElement('canvas'),
                        ctx = canvas.getContext("2d");

                    // set proper canvas dimensions before transform & export
                    if (4 < srcOrientation && srcOrientation < 9) {
                        canvas.width = height;
                        canvas.height = width;
                    } else {
                        canvas.width = width;
                        canvas.height = height;
                    }

                    // transform context before drawing image
                    switch (srcOrientation) {
                        case 2: ctx.transform(-1, 0, 0, 1, width, 0); break;
                        case 3: ctx.transform(-1, 0, 0, -1, width, height); break;
                        case 4: ctx.transform(1, 0, 0, -1, 0, height); break;
                        case 5: ctx.transform(0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0); break;
                        case 6: ctx.transform(0, 1, -1, 0, height, 0); break;
                        case 7: ctx.transform(0, -1, -1, 0, height, width); break;
                        case 8: ctx.transform(0, -1, 1, 0, 0, width); break;
                        default: break;
                    }

                    // draw image
                    ctx.drawImage(img, 0, 0);

                    // export base64
                    callback2(canvas.toDataURL());
                };

                img.src = srcBase64;
            }

            reader2.readAsDataURL(file);
        }

        var reader = new FileReader();
        reader.onload = function (e) {

            var view = new DataView(e.target.result);
            if (view.getUint16(0, false) != 0xFFD8) return callback(-2);
            var length = view.byteLength, offset = 2;
            while (offset < length) {
                var marker = view.getUint16(offset, false);
                offset += 2;
                if (marker == 0xFFE1) {
                    if (view.getUint32(offset += 2, false) != 0x45786966) return callback(-1);
                    var little = view.getUint16(offset += 6, false) == 0x4949;
                    offset += view.getUint32(offset + 4, little);
                    var tags = view.getUint16(offset, little);
                    offset += 2;
                    for (var i = 0; i < tags; i++)
                        if (view.getUint16(offset + (i * 12), little) == 0x0112)
                            return callback(view.getUint16(offset + (i * 12) + 8, little));
                }
                else if ((marker & 0xFF00) != 0xFF00) break;
                else offset += view.getUint16(offset, false);
            }
            return callback(-1);
        };
        reader.readAsArrayBuffer(file);
    }

which can easily be called like such

getDataUrl(input.files[0], function (imgBase64) {
      vm.user.BioPhoto = imgBase64;
});
  • 1
    Thank after over 2-hour search by google I find the right solution. – Mr.Trieu Jun 12 at 9:37
  • 2
    why would someone be lazy to prefer a much lighter solution? – dewd Aug 8 at 18:05

In addition to @fareed namrouti's answer,

This should be used if the image has to be browsed from a file input element

<input type="file" name="file" id="file-input"><br/>
image after transform: <br/>
<div id="container"></div>

<script>
    document.getElementById('file-input').onchange = function (e) {
        var image = e.target.files[0];
        window.loadImage(image, function (img) {
            if (img.type === "error") {
                console.log("couldn't load image:", img);
            } else {
                window.EXIF.getData(image, function () {
                    console.log("load image done!");
                    var orientation = window.EXIF.getTag(this, "Orientation");
                    var canvas = window.loadImage.scale(img,
                        {orientation: orientation || 0, canvas: true, maxWidth: 200});
                    document.getElementById("container").appendChild(canvas);
                    // or using jquery $("#container").append(canvas);
                });
            }
        });
    };
</script>

I am using mixed solution (php+css).

Containers are needed for:

  • div.imgCont2 container needed to rotate;
  • div.imgCont1 container needed to zoomOut - width:150%;
  • div.imgCont container needed for scrollbars, when image is zoomOut.

.

<?php
    $image_url = 'your image url.jpg';
    $exif = @exif_read_data($image_url,0,true);
    $orientation = @$exif['IFD0']['Orientation'];
?>

<style>
.imgCont{
    width:100%;
    overflow:auto;
}
.imgCont2[data-orientation="8"]{
    transform:rotate(270deg);
    margin:15% 0;
}
.imgCont2[data-orientation="6"]{
    transform:rotate(90deg);
    margin:15% 0;
}
.imgCont2[data-orientation="3"]{
    transform:rotate(180deg);
}
img{
    width:100%;
}
</style>

<div class="imgCont">
  <div class="imgCont1">
    <div class="imgCont2" data-orientation="<?php echo($orientation) ?>">
      <img src="<?php echo($image_url) ?>">
    </div>
  </div>
</div>

I've written a little php script which rotates the image. Be sure to store the image in favour of just recalculate it each request.

<?php

header("Content-type: image/jpeg");
$img = 'IMG URL';

$exif = @exif_read_data($img,0,true);
$orientation = @$exif['IFD0']['Orientation'];
if($orientation == 7 || $orientation == 8) {
    $degrees = 90;
} elseif($orientation == 5 || $orientation == 6) {
    $degrees = 270;
} elseif($orientation == 3 || $orientation == 4) {
    $degrees = 180;
} else {
    $degrees = 0;
}
$rotate = imagerotate(imagecreatefromjpeg($img), $degrees, 0);
imagejpeg($rotate);
imagedestroy($rotate);

?>

Cheers

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