Just wanted to ask how to create the simplest possible countdown timer.

There'll be a sentence on the site saying:

"Registration closes in 05:00 minutes!"

So, what I want to do is to create a simple js countdown timer that goes from "05:00" to "00:00" and then resets to "05:00" once it ends.

I was going through some answers before, but they all seem too intense (Date objects, etc.) for what I want to do.

closed as too broad by Matt May 12 '16 at 21:08

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 11
    If you are asking for code you must show that you have made some attempt to solve the problem yourself - and that means showing some code first. Otherwise people will assume that you're asking us to do your homework for you! – Rob Baillie Dec 16 '13 at 18:43
  • 4
    And again, you're leaving out the relevant HTML, though at least you've sort of explained the complexity issue this time. But seriously, you need to look into making a solution yourself, and then come and ask us about problems you're having. – David Thomas Dec 16 '13 at 18:43
  • Code examples with complaints on how they are too complicated? Anyway, I think you could easily setInterval and make it .innerHTML based, instead of date based. – bjb568 Dec 16 '13 at 18:44
  • 1
    Yes, people should look for making the solution themselves. But with javaScript there are plenty examples of doing common tasks. I know how to do a count down timer, but I prefer if I find one in the web (like a component). So thanks to this question and the extensive answer I found what I was looking for. Countdown logic – Carlos Rafael Ramirez Apr 7 '15 at 2:48
  • 2
    I found these solutions to be simpler: stackoverflow.com/questions/32141035/… – nu everest Aug 25 '16 at 21:11
up vote 363 down vote accepted

I have two demos, one with jQuery and one without. Neither use date functions and are about as simple as it gets.

Demo with vanilla JavaScript

function startTimer(duration, display) {
    var timer = duration, minutes, seconds;
    setInterval(function () {
        minutes = parseInt(timer / 60, 10)
        seconds = parseInt(timer % 60, 10);

        minutes = minutes < 10 ? "0" + minutes : minutes;
        seconds = seconds < 10 ? "0" + seconds : seconds;

        display.textContent = minutes + ":" + seconds;

        if (--timer < 0) {
            timer = duration;
        }
    }, 1000);
}

window.onload = function () {
    var fiveMinutes = 60 * 5,
        display = document.querySelector('#time');
    startTimer(fiveMinutes, display);
};
<body>
    <div>Registration closes in <span id="time">05:00</span> minutes!</div>
</body>

Demo with jQuery

function startTimer(duration, display) {
    var timer = duration, minutes, seconds;
    setInterval(function () {
        minutes = parseInt(timer / 60, 10);
        seconds = parseInt(timer % 60, 10);

        minutes = minutes < 10 ? "0" + minutes : minutes;
        seconds = seconds < 10 ? "0" + seconds : seconds;

        display.text(minutes + ":" + seconds);

        if (--timer < 0) {
            timer = duration;
        }
    }, 1000);
}

jQuery(function ($) {
    var fiveMinutes = 60 * 5,
        display = $('#time');
    startTimer(fiveMinutes, display);
});

However if you want a more accurate timer that is only slightly more complicated:

function startTimer(duration, display) {
    var start = Date.now(),
        diff,
        minutes,
        seconds;
    function timer() {
        // get the number of seconds that have elapsed since 
        // startTimer() was called
        diff = duration - (((Date.now() - start) / 1000) | 0);

        // does the same job as parseInt truncates the float
        minutes = (diff / 60) | 0;
        seconds = (diff % 60) | 0;

        minutes = minutes < 10 ? "0" + minutes : minutes;
        seconds = seconds < 10 ? "0" + seconds : seconds;

        display.textContent = minutes + ":" + seconds; 

        if (diff <= 0) {
            // add one second so that the count down starts at the full duration
            // example 05:00 not 04:59
            start = Date.now() + 1000;
        }
    };
    // we don't want to wait a full second before the timer starts
    timer();
    setInterval(timer, 1000);
}

window.onload = function () {
    var fiveMinutes = 60 * 5,
        display = document.querySelector('#time');
    startTimer(fiveMinutes, display);
};
<body>
    <div>Registration closes in <span id="time"></span> minutes!</div>
</body>

Now that we have made a few pretty simple timers we can start to think about re-usability and separating concerns. We can do this by asking "what should a count down timer do?"

  • Should a count down timer count down? Yes
  • Should a count down timer know how to display itself on the DOM? No
  • Should a count down timer know to restart itself when it reaches 0? No
  • Should a count down timer provide a way for a client to access how much time is left? Yes

So with these things in mind lets write a better (but still very simple) CountDownTimer

function CountDownTimer(duration, granularity) {
  this.duration = duration;
  this.granularity = granularity || 1000;
  this.tickFtns = [];
  this.running = false;
}

CountDownTimer.prototype.start = function() {
  if (this.running) {
    return;
  }
  this.running = true;
  var start = Date.now(),
      that = this,
      diff, obj;

  (function timer() {
    diff = that.duration - (((Date.now() - start) / 1000) | 0);

    if (diff > 0) {
      setTimeout(timer, that.granularity);
    } else {
      diff = 0;
      that.running = false;
    }

    obj = CountDownTimer.parse(diff);
    that.tickFtns.forEach(function(ftn) {
      ftn.call(this, obj.minutes, obj.seconds);
    }, that);
  }());
};

CountDownTimer.prototype.onTick = function(ftn) {
  if (typeof ftn === 'function') {
    this.tickFtns.push(ftn);
  }
  return this;
};

CountDownTimer.prototype.expired = function() {
  return !this.running;
};

CountDownTimer.parse = function(seconds) {
  return {
    'minutes': (seconds / 60) | 0,
    'seconds': (seconds % 60) | 0
  };
};

So why is this implementation better than the others? Here are some examples of what you can do with it. Note that all but the first example can't be achieved by the startTimer functions.

An example that displays the time in XX:XX format and restarts after reaching 00:00

An example that displays the time in two different formats

An example that has two different timers and only one restarts

An example that starts the count down timer when a button is pressed

  • 2
    You're the man! That's exactly what I was looking for. Thank you! One more thing: how can I add "0" in front of minutes, so it shows "04:59", instead of "4:59"? – Bartek Dec 16 '13 at 19:36
  • 1
    minutes = minutes < 10 ? "0" + minutes : minutes; – robbmj Dec 16 '13 at 19:37
  • 5
    @timbram it looked weird to me at first too, until i realized that a comma after a var declaration separates different declarations. so minutes and seconds are simply declared (but un-initialized) variables. so timer is simply just equal the the duration parameter, nothing more, nothing less. – abustamam Jul 15 '15 at 22:06
  • 2
    @SinanErdem I have written some code that does this. I can add that code to the answer later today. I will ping you when this is done. – robbmj Mar 29 '16 at 16:48
  • 3
    How do you add a reset options? And also a pause and resume? I tried adding a field this.reset, and check that in the closure. But the clock keeps going though. – Dzung Nguyen Aug 18 '16 at 22:58

If you want a real timer you need to use the date object.

Calculate the difference.

Format your string.

window.onload=function(){
      var start=Date.now(),r=document.getElementById('r');
      (function f(){
      var diff=Date.now()-start,ns=(((3e5-diff)/1e3)>>0),m=(ns/60)>>0,s=ns-m*60;
      r.textContent="Registration closes in "+m+':'+((''+s).length>1?'':'0')+s;
      if(diff>3e5){
         start=Date.now()
      }
      setTimeout(f,1e3);
      })();
}

Example

Jsfiddle

not so precise timer

var time=5*60,r=document.getElementById('r'),tmp=time;

setInterval(function(){
    var c=tmp--,m=(c/60)>>0,s=(c-m*60)+'';
    r.textContent='Registration closes in '+m+':'+(s.length>1?'':'0')+s
    tmp!=0||(tmp=time);
},1000);

JsFiddle

You can easily create a timer functionality by using setInterval.Below is the code which you can use it to create the timer.

http://jsfiddle.net/ayyadurai/GXzhZ/1/

window.onload = function() {
  var hour = 2;
  var sec = 60;
  setInterval(function() {
    document.getElementById("timer").innerHTML = hour + " : " + sec;
    sec--;
    if (sec == 00) {
      hour--;
      sec = 60;
      if (hour == 0) {
        hour = 2;
      }
    }
  }, 1000);
}
Registration closes in <span id="timer">05:00<span> minutes!

  • 3
    Does not accurately represent each second, it's counting down much too fast. – Scott Rowley Nov 21 '17 at 19:15
  • 3
    Changing the 500 to 1000 seems to make it accurate. – Scott Rowley Nov 21 '17 at 19:16

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.