I am wondering wether the Password Hasher that is default implemented in the UserManager that comes with MVC 5 and ASP.NET Identity Framework, is secure enough? And if so, if you could explain to me how it works?

IPasswordHasher interface looks like this:

public interface IPasswordHasher
{
    string HashPassword(string password);
    PasswordVerificationResult VerifyHashedPassword(string hashedPassword, 
                                                       string providedPassword);
}

As you can see, it doesn't take a salt, but it is mentioned in this thread: "Asp.net Identity password hashing" that it does infact salt it behind the scenes. So I am wondering how does it do this? And where does this salt come from?

My concern is that the salt is static, rendering it quite insecure.

  • I don't think this directly answers your question, but Brock Allen has written about some of your concerns here => brockallen.com/2013/10/20/… and also written an open source user identity management and authentication library that has various boiler-plate features like password reset, hashing etc etc. github.com/brockallen/BrockAllen.MembershipReboot – Shiva Dec 16 '13 at 22:22
  • @Shiva Thanks, I will look into the library and the video on the page. But I would rather not have to deal with an external library. Not if I can avoid it. – André Snede Kock Dec 16 '13 at 22:33
  • 2
    FYI: the stackoverflow equivalent for security. So although you will often get a good/correct answer here. The experts are on security.stackexchange.com especially the comment "is it secure" I asked a similar sort of question and the depth and quality of answer was amazing. – phil soady Dec 16 '13 at 22:50
  • @philsoady Thanks, that makes sense of course, Im already on a few of the other "sub-forums", if I do not get an answer, I can use, I will move over to securiry.stackexchange.com. And thanks for the tip! – André Snede Kock Dec 16 '13 at 22:52
up vote 181 down vote accepted

Here is how the default implementation works. It uses a Key Derivation Function with random salt to produce the hash. The salt is included as part of the output of the KDF. Thus, each time you "hash" the same password you will get different hashes. To verify the hash the output is split back to the salt and the rest, and the KDF is run again on the password with the specified salt. If the result matches to the rest of the initial output the hash is verified.

Hashing:

public static string HashPassword(string password)
{
    byte[] salt;
    byte[] buffer2;
    if (password == null)
    {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("password");
    }
    using (Rfc2898DeriveBytes bytes = new Rfc2898DeriveBytes(password, 0x10, 0x3e8))
    {
        salt = bytes.Salt;
        buffer2 = bytes.GetBytes(0x20);
    }
    byte[] dst = new byte[0x31];
    Buffer.BlockCopy(salt, 0, dst, 1, 0x10);
    Buffer.BlockCopy(buffer2, 0, dst, 0x11, 0x20);
    return Convert.ToBase64String(dst);
}

Verifying:

public static bool VerifyHashedPassword(string hashedPassword, string password)
{
    byte[] buffer4;
    if (hashedPassword == null)
    {
        return false;
    }
    if (password == null)
    {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("password");
    }
    byte[] src = Convert.FromBase64String(hashedPassword);
    if ((src.Length != 0x31) || (src[0] != 0))
    {
        return false;
    }
    byte[] dst = new byte[0x10];
    Buffer.BlockCopy(src, 1, dst, 0, 0x10);
    byte[] buffer3 = new byte[0x20];
    Buffer.BlockCopy(src, 0x11, buffer3, 0, 0x20);
    using (Rfc2898DeriveBytes bytes = new Rfc2898DeriveBytes(password, dst, 0x3e8))
    {
        buffer4 = bytes.GetBytes(0x20);
    }
    return ByteArraysEqual(buffer3, buffer4);
}
  • 4
    So if I understand this correctly, the HashPassword function, returns both in the same string? And when you verify it, it splits it again it up again, and hashes the incoming cleartext password, with the salt from the split, and compares it with the original hash? – André Snede Kock Dec 16 '13 at 22:55
  • 7
    @AndréSnedeHansen, exactly. And I too recommend you asking either on security or on cryptography SE. The "is it secure" part may be addressed better in those respective contexts. – Andrew Savinykh Dec 16 '13 at 22:56
  • 3
    Thanks for explaining that, now I can sleep peacefully :)! – André Snede Kock Dec 16 '13 at 22:58
  • 2
    @AndrewSavinykh I know, that's why I'm asking - what's the point? To make the code look smarter? ;) Cause for me counting stuff using decimal numbers is A LOT more intuitive (we have 10 fingers after all - at least most of us), so declaring a number of something using hexadecimals seems like an unnecessary code obfuscation. – Andrew Cyrul Apr 13 '17 at 9:27
  • 1
    @MihaiAlexandru-Ionut var hashedPassword = HashPassword(password); var result = VerifyHashedPassword(hashedPassword, password); - is what you need to do. after that result contains true. – Andrew Savinykh Aug 13 at 19:57

Because these days ASP.NET is open source, you can find it on GitHub: AspNet.Identity 3.0 and AspNet.Identity 2.0.

From the comments:

/* =======================
 * HASHED PASSWORD FORMATS
 * =======================
 * 
 * Version 2:
 * PBKDF2 with HMAC-SHA1, 128-bit salt, 256-bit subkey, 1000 iterations.
 * (See also: SDL crypto guidelines v5.1, Part III)
 * Format: { 0x00, salt, subkey }
 *
 * Version 3:
 * PBKDF2 with HMAC-SHA256, 128-bit salt, 256-bit subkey, 10000 iterations.
 * Format: { 0x01, prf (UInt32), iter count (UInt32), salt length (UInt32), salt, subkey }
 * (All UInt32s are stored big-endian.)
 */
  • Yes, and worth noting, there are additions to the algorithm zespri is showing. – André Snede Kock Jan 12 '16 at 21:36
  • 1
    The source on GitHub is Asp.Net.Identity 3.0 which is still in prerelease. The source of the 2.0 hash function is on CodePlex – David Nov 25 '16 at 15:52

I understand the accepted answer, and have up-voted it but thought I'd dump my laymen's answer here...

Creating a hash

  1. The salt is randomly generated using the function Rfc2898DeriveBytes which generates a hash and a salt. Inputs to Rfc2898DeriveBytes are the password, the size of the salt to generate and the number of hashing iterations to perform. https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/h83s4e12(v=vs.110).aspx
  2. The salt and the hash are then mashed together(salt first followed by the hash) and encoded as a string (so the salt is encoded in the hash). This encoded hash (which contains the salt and hash) is then stored (typically) in the database against the user.

Checking a password against a hash

To check a password that a user inputs.

  1. The salt is extracted from the stored hashed password.
  2. The salt is used to hash the users input password using an overload of Rfc2898DeriveBytes which takes a salt instead of generating one. https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/yx129kfs(v=vs.110).aspx
  3. The stored hash and the test hash are then compared.

The Hash

Under the covers the hash is generated using the SHA1 hash function (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SHA-1). This function is iteratively called 1000 times (In the default Identity implementation)

Why is this secure

  • Random salts means that an attacker can’t use a pre-generated table of hashs to try and break passwords. They would need to generate a hash table for every salt. (Assuming here that the hacker has also compromised your salt)
  • If 2 passwords are identical they will have different hashes. (meaning attackers can’t infer ‘common’ passwords)
  • Iteratively calling SHA1 1000 times means that the attacker also needs to do this. The idea being that unless they have time on a supercomputer they won’t have enough resource to brute force the password from the hash. It would massively slow down the time to generate a hash table for a given salt.
  • Thanks for your explanation. In the "Creating a hash 2." you mention that the salt and hash are mashed together, do you know if this is stored in the PasswordHash in the AspNetUsers table. Is the salt stored anywhere for me to see? – unicorn2 Mar 9 at 8:12
  • 1
    @unicorn2 If you take a look at Andrew Savinykh's answer... In the section about hashing it looks like the salt is stored in the first 16 bytes of the byte array which is Base64 encoded and written to the database. You would be able to see this Base64 encoded string in the PasswordHash table. All you can say about the Base64 string is that roughly the first third of it is the salt. The meaningful salt is the first 16 bytes of the Base64 decoded version of the full string stored in the PasswordHash table – Nattrass Mar 18 at 16:32

For those like me who are brand new to this, here is code with const and an actual way to compare the byte[]'s. I got all of this code from stackoverflow but defined consts so values could be changed and also

// 24 = 192 bits
    private const int SaltByteSize = 24;
    private const int HashByteSize = 24;
    private const int HasingIterationsCount = 10101;


    public static string HashPassword(string password)
    {
        // http://stackoverflow.com/questions/19957176/asp-net-identity-password-hashing

        byte[] salt;
        byte[] buffer2;
        if (password == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("password");
        }
        using (Rfc2898DeriveBytes bytes = new Rfc2898DeriveBytes(password, SaltByteSize, HasingIterationsCount))
        {
            salt = bytes.Salt;
            buffer2 = bytes.GetBytes(HashByteSize);
        }
        byte[] dst = new byte[(SaltByteSize + HashByteSize) + 1];
        Buffer.BlockCopy(salt, 0, dst, 1, SaltByteSize);
        Buffer.BlockCopy(buffer2, 0, dst, SaltByteSize + 1, HashByteSize);
        return Convert.ToBase64String(dst);
    }

    public static bool VerifyHashedPassword(string hashedPassword, string password)
    {
        byte[] _passwordHashBytes;

        int _arrayLen = (SaltByteSize + HashByteSize) + 1;

        if (hashedPassword == null)
        {
            return false;
        }

        if (password == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("password");
        }

        byte[] src = Convert.FromBase64String(hashedPassword);

        if ((src.Length != _arrayLen) || (src[0] != 0))
        {
            return false;
        }

        byte[] _currentSaltBytes = new byte[SaltByteSize];
        Buffer.BlockCopy(src, 1, _currentSaltBytes, 0, SaltByteSize);

        byte[] _currentHashBytes = new byte[HashByteSize];
        Buffer.BlockCopy(src, SaltByteSize + 1, _currentHashBytes, 0, HashByteSize);

        using (Rfc2898DeriveBytes bytes = new Rfc2898DeriveBytes(password, _currentSaltBytes, HasingIterationsCount))
        {
            _passwordHashBytes = bytes.GetBytes(SaltByteSize);
        }

        return AreHashesEqual(_currentHashBytes, _passwordHashBytes);

    }

    private static bool AreHashesEqual(byte[] firstHash, byte[] secondHash)
    {
        int _minHashLength = firstHash.Length <= secondHash.Length ? firstHash.Length : secondHash.Length;
        var xor = firstHash.Length ^ secondHash.Length;
        for (int i = 0; i < _minHashLength; i++)
            xor |= firstHash[i] ^ secondHash[i];
        return 0 == xor;
    }

In in your custom ApplicationUserManager, you set the PasswordHasher property the name of the class which contains the above code.

  • For this.. _passwordHashBytes = bytes.GetBytes(SaltByteSize); I guess you meant this _passwordHashBytes = bytes.GetBytes(HashByteSize);.. Doesn't matter in your scenario since both are of the same size but in general.. – Akshatha Feb 5 at 2:34

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