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In Python, what does it mean when *= is used. For example:

for i in xrange(len(files)):
    itimes[i,:,:] *= thishdr["truitime"]
1

3 Answers 3

14

As others have explained, this is roughly an equivalent to:

[object] = [object] * [another_object]

However, it's not exactly the same. Technically, the above calls the __mul__ function, which returns a value, and reassign it back to the name.

For example, we have an object A and multiplying it with B. The process is something like this:

> Call the __mul__ function of object A, 
> Retrieve the new object returned.
> Reassign it to the name A.

Looks simple. Now, by doing *= we're not invoking the method __mul__, but instead __imul__, which will attempt to modify itself. The process is something like this:

> Call the __imul__ function of object A,
> __imul__ will change the value of the object, it returns the modified object itself
> The value is reassigned back to the name A, but still points to the same place in memory.

With this, you're modifying it in-place, not creating a new object.

So what? It looks the same..

Not exactly. If you replaces an object, you created a new place for it in memory. If you modify it in-place, the object location in the memory will always be the same.

Take a look at this console session:

>>> a = [1, 2, 3]
>>> b = a
>>> c = 10
>>> a = a * c
>>> print a
[1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3]
>>> b
[1, 2, 3]

If we check the memory address:

>>> id(a) == id(b)

False

Using this, the value of b is unchanged, since a is now just pointing to a different place. But using *=:

>>> a = [1, 2, 3]
>>> b = a
>>> c = 10
>>> a *= c
>>> b
[1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3]

And if we check the memory address:

>>> id(a) == id(b)
True

The operation affects b as well. This can be tricky and leading to confusing behaviours, sometimes. But once you understand it, it would be easy to handle.

Hope this helps!

3
  • __imul__ does return its result (which is usually self), and that result is assigned back to the variable.
    – lvc
    Dec 17, 2013 at 0:26
  • Now, i'm the one confused. Turns out i know less than i thought. @lvc Can you please help me understand it? What's the actual difference? Meanwhile, i'll delete my answer. Can you come to chat?
    – aIKid
    Dec 17, 2013 at 0:40
  • Ah wait, i think i understand.
    – aIKid
    Dec 17, 2013 at 0:47
9

It just means "[expression on the left] = [itself] * [expression on the right]":

itimes[i,:,:] *= thishdr["truitime"]

is equivalent to

itimes[i,:,:] = itimes[i,:,:] * thishdr["truitime"]

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  • 14
    Well, technically it invokes the __imul__ method of the left hand side, which could do anything.
    – Marcin
    Dec 16, 2013 at 23:16
  • It attempts to perform the multiplication in-place, if the left-hand side implements an in-place version. Dec 16, 2013 at 23:17
  • 1
    In a similar vein, +=, -=, /=, //= &=, |=, <<=, **=, >>=, and ^= should all do what you expect them to, assuming you have reasonable definitions of __imul__, __iadd__, etc. Dec 16, 2013 at 23:34
  • @Marcin good point, but operator overloading (that doesn't conform to what one would expect from *) is really really really bad practice. It breaks the elegance of the language. Dec 16, 2013 at 23:48
  • @MikeMcMahon So...I shouldn't bother telling people about it? What's your point here?
    – Marcin
    Dec 17, 2013 at 13:01
1

It means "set this variable to itself times "

>>> fred = 10
>>> fred *= 10                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
>>> fred                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
100                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         
>>> barney = ["a"]                                                                                                                                                                                                                            
>>> barney *= 10                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
>>> barney 
['a', 'a', 'a', 'a', 'a', 'a', 'a', 'a', 'a', 'a']                                                                                                                                                                                          

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