619

To set the minimal distance between flexbox items I'm using margin: 0 5px on .item and margin: 0 -5px on container. For me it seems like a hack, but I can't find any better way to do this.

Example

#box {
  display: flex;
  width: 100px;
  margin: 0 -5px;
}
.item {
  background: gray;
  width: 50px;
  height: 50px;
  margin: 0 5px;
}
<div id='box'>
  <div class='item'></div>
  <div class='item'></div>
  <div class='item'></div>
  <div class='item'></div>
</div>

38 Answers 38

341
  • Flexbox doesn't have collapsing margins.
  • Flexbox doesn't have anything akin to border-spacing for tables (except for CSS property gap which isn't well supported in most browsers, caniuse)

Therefore achieving what you are asking for is a bit more difficult.

In my experience, the "cleanest" way that doesn't use :first-child/:last-child and works without any modification on flex-wrap:wrap is to set padding:5px on the container and margin:5px on the children. That will produce a 10px gap between each children and between each children and their parent.

Demo

.upper
{
  margin:30px;
  display:flex;
  flex-direction:row;
  width:300px;
  height:80px;
  border:1px red solid;

  padding:5px; /* this */
}

.upper > div
{
  flex:1 1 auto;
  border:1px red solid;
  text-align:center;

  margin:5px;  /* and that, will result in a 10px gap */
}

.upper.mc /* multicol test */
{flex-direction:column;flex-wrap:wrap;width:200px;height:200px;}
<div class="upper">
  <div>aaa<br/>aaa</div>
  <div>aaa</div>
  <div>aaa<br/>aaa</div>
  <div>aaa<br/>aaa<br/>aaa</div>
  <div>aaa</div>
  <div>aaa</div>
</div>

<div class="upper mc">
  <div>aaa<br/>aaa</div>
  <div>aaa</div>
  <div>aaa<br/>aaa</div>
  <div>aaa<br/>aaa<br/>aaa</div>
  <div>aaa</div>
  <div>aaa</div>
</div>

  • 167
    This doesn't accomplish the same thing as the question asks, you will have a 10px indent on the far left and right, which I'm assuming they don't intend to have. Hence, the negative margins in the original question. – Chris Nicola Jul 24 '15 at 19:55
  • 15
    What about if order property set? :first-child/:last-child will not work as expected. – Guria Sep 2 '15 at 20:47
  • 4
    “Flexbox doesn't have collapsing margins.” Very insightful, and apparently true, but may I ask for a citation? – chharvey Jul 12 '16 at 15:40
  • 7
    @chharvey, from the spec w3.org/TR/css-flexbox-1/#item-margins, "The margins of adjacent flex items do not collapse." – romellem Oct 30 '17 at 17:16
  • 2
    @Tin Yes, if there is space around to distribute. Meaning that the minimal margin width you get is zero. CSS is a mess. – amn May 23 '18 at 11:48
172

This is not a hack. The same technique is also used by bootstrap and its grid, though, instead of margin, bootstrap uses padding for its cols.

.row {
  margin:0 -15px;
}
.col-xx-xx {
  padding:0 15px;
}
  • 1
    The only issue with this method are maintaining equal height items with background colors. Absolute positioning with height:100%; width:100% ignores the item's padding. – Steven Vachon May 13 '16 at 19:55
  • 3
    The problem here is with IE10 and 11. flex-basis values do not account for box-sizing: border-box, so a child with any padding or border will overflow the parent (or wrap in this case). Source – Carson Jun 1 '16 at 13:35
  • 16
    There is another problem with this approach: adjusting the margin like this can expand the page width. Demo: jsfiddle.net/a97tatf6/1 – Nathan Osman Feb 9 '17 at 10:11
  • 1
    @Carson would it not be an option to disable box-sizing: border-box on just that div? – w00t Aug 23 '17 at 13:01
  • 2
    Though I agree this is not a hack, the fact that something is widely used does not mean it is not a hack. See polyfills, temporary security patches, hex editing, etc etc – William Sep 4 '18 at 23:38
88

flexbox and css calc()

Hello, below is my working solution for all browsers supporting flexbox. No negative margins, no hacks, no workarounds, pure Css.

Fiddle Demo

   
.flexbox {
  display: flex;
  flex-direction: row;
  flex-wrap: wrap;
  justify-content: space-between;
}

.flexbox > div {
  /*
    1/3  - 3 columns per row
    10px - spacing between columns 
  */
  box-sizing: border-box;
  margin-bottom: 10px;
  outline: 1px dotted red;
  width: calc(1/3*100% - (1 - 1/3)*10px);
}
<div class="flexbox">
  <div>col</div>
  <div>col</div>
  <div>col</div>
  <div>col</div>
  <div>col</div>
  <div>col</div>
</div>

  • 11
    I like this solution but it fails if there are only 2 items in the last row. The items aren't stacked together due to the justify-content. – James Brantly May 9 '17 at 12:50
  • 3
    to fix the two item issue just change to justify-content: space-evenly; or justify-content: space-around;. – Paul Rooney Jan 8 '18 at 3:17
  • 4
    @PaulRooney On site with multiple lists you might not always know the number of items, if the lists are generated by a CMS. – NinjaFart Mar 3 '18 at 14:31
  • @1.21gigawatts Please don't make arbitrary changes to someone else's code/answer; write your own answer instead. – TylerH Jul 3 at 13:30
  • @TylerH It wasn't arbitrary. The question asked how, "...to set distance between flexbox items". This answer doesn't show the size of the gutter. Setting a background color shows the gutter. Adding a border shows there is margin below the last row. – 1.21 gigawatts Jul 4 at 18:47
86

You can use transparent borders.

I have contemplated this issue while trying to build a flex grid model which can fallback to a tables + table-cell model for older browsers. And Borders for column gutters seemed to me the best appropriate choice. i.e. Table-cells don't have margins.

e.g.

.column{
  border-left: 5px solid transparent;
  border-right: 5px solid transparent;
  border-bottom: 10px solid transparent;
}

Also note that you need min-width: 50px; for flexbox. The flex model will not handle fixed sizes unless you do flex: none; on the particular child element you want as fixed and therefore excluded from being "flexi". http://jsfiddle.net/GLpUp/4/ But all columns together with flex:none; is no longer a flex model. Here is something closer to a flex model: http://jsfiddle.net/GLpUp/5/

So you can actually use margins normally if you don't need the table-cell fallback for older browsers. http://jsfiddle.net/GLpUp/3/

Setting background-clip: padding-box; will be necessary when using a background, as otherwise the background will flow into the transparent border area.

  • 5
    great answer. margins are used differently in flexbox's ( like to absorb extra space ) so transparent borders provide an excellent solution to evenly spaced elements that can wrap with a margin-like behavior – Eolis Mar 4 '15 at 1:12
  • 4
    except when you use background color, your background exceeds your desired bounds. – ahnbizcad Apr 30 '15 at 6:11
  • 2
    @ahnbizcad Well with different background colors, you can use white or the adequate color depending on which way is the background. – hexalys Apr 30 '15 at 6:17
  • 26
    @ahnbizcad: If you don't need IE8 support, this is a better solution: background-clip: padding-box – Albin May 20 '15 at 17:29
  • 4
    Albin's comment here needs more votes! This is the best solution. Transparent borders, in combination with background-clip: padding-box (and negative margins on the container, if needed, for proper edge alignment) is a perfect solution. IE8 doesn't support flexbox anyway so its lack of support for background-clip shouldn't matter. – Brian Nov 24 '15 at 22:27
56

This will work for all cases even if there is multiple rows or any number of elements.

We are using display: grid; and its properties.

#box {
  display: grid;
  width: 100px;
  grid-gap: 5px;
  /* Space between items */
  grid-template-columns: 1fr 1fr 1fr 1fr;
  /* Decide the number of columns and size */
}

.item {
  background: gray;
  width: 100%;
  /* width is not necessary only added this to understand that width works as 100% to the grid template allocated space **DEFAULT WIDTH WILL BE 100%** */
  height: 50px;
}
<div id='box'>
  <div class='item'></div>
  <div class='item'></div>
  <div class='item'></div>
  <div class='item'></div>
  <div class='item'></div>
  <div class='item'></div>
  <div class='item'></div>
  <div class='item'></div>
</div>

The Downside of this method is in Mobile Opera Mini will not be supported and in PC this works only after IE10.

Note for complete browser compatability including IE11 please use Autoprefixer


OLD ANSWER

Don't think of it as an old solution, it's still one of the best if you only want single row of elements and it will work with all the browsers.

This method is used by CSS sibling combination, so you can manipulate it many other ways also, but if your combination is wrong it may cause issues also.

.item+.item{
  margin-left: 5px;
}

The below code will do the trick. In this method, there is no need to give margin: 0 -5px; to the #box wrapper.

A working sample for you:

#box {
  display: flex;
  width: 100px;
}
.item {
  background: gray;
  width: 22px;
  height: 50px;
}
.item+.item{
 margin-left: 5px;
}
<div id='box'>
  <div class='item'></div>
  <div class='item'></div>
  <div class='item'></div>
  <div class='item'></div>
</div>

  • 2
    Nice solution, but it does not work on elements that wrap--they are still considered siblings and will get a left margin. – Seth Jul 8 '18 at 21:40
  • @Seth I don't get it can you be more specific, if you give me as sample maybe I can provide a Solution for it also.! – weBBer Jul 9 '18 at 5:53
  • @weBBer just add enough .item divs to force a wrap to the next row. You will need to set flex-wrap: wrap on the container. The first .item div on the second row will have its left margin set and will not be aligned. – Seth Jul 15 '18 at 14:37
  • 2
    @CodyGray it seems you have misread my intentions there. I only added "Updated 2019" because most of us designers don't go for the old solution and we have to go through all these old outdated answers to find the latest and working answer and as you can see this is a very old post so many old and outdated answers here. – weBBer Feb 12 at 12:15
  • 2
    @Seth sorry to Re-post this comment - As you can see someone has removed my old comment and your question to me still look unanswered. So, guys, my updates answer will work with all the scenarios with the grid even works with #seths multiple row condition – weBBer Mar 18 at 12:25
32
+250

You can use & > * + * as a selector to emulate a flex-gap (for a single line):

#box { display: flex; width: 230px; outline: 1px solid blue; }
.item { background: gray; width: 50px; height: 100px; }

/* ----- Flexbox gap: ----- */

#box > * + * {
  margin-left: 10px;
}
<div id='box'>
    <div class='item'></div>
    <div class='item'></div>
    <div class='item'></div>
    <div class='item'></div>
</div>

If you need to support flex wrapping, you can use a wrapper element:

.flex { display: flex; flex-wrap: wrap;  }
.box { background: gray; height: 100px; min-width: 100px; flex: auto; }
.flex-wrapper {outline: 1px solid red; }

/* ----- Flex gap 10px: ----- */

.flex > * {
  margin: 5px;
}
.flex {
  margin: -5px;
}
.flex-wrapper {
  width: 400px; /* optional */
  overflow: hidden; /* optional */
}
<div class='flex-wrapper'>
  <div class='flex'>
    <div class='box'></div>
    <div class='box'></div>
    <div class='box'></div>
    <div class='box'></div>
    <div class='box'></div>
  </div>
</div>

21

Let's say if you want to set 10px space between the items, you can just set .item {margin-right:10px;} for all, and reset it on the last one .item:last-child {margin-right:0;}

You can also use general sibling ~ or next + sibling selector to set left margin on the items excluding the first one .item ~ .item {margin-left:10px;} or use .item:not(:last-child) {margin-right: 10px;}

Flexbox is so clever that it automatically recalculates and equally distributes the grid.

body {
  margin: 0;
}

.container {
  display: flex;
}

.item {
  flex: 1;
  background: gray;
  height: 50px;
}

.item:not(:last-child) {
  margin-right: 10px;
}
<div class="container">
  <div class="item"></div>
  <div class="item"></div>
  <div class="item"></div>
  <div class="item"></div>
</div>

If you want to allow flex wrap, see the following example.

body {
  margin: 0;
}

.container {
  display: flex;
  flex-wrap: wrap;
  margin-left: -10px;
}

.item {
  flex: 0 0 calc(50% - 10px);
  background: gray;
  height: 50px;
  margin: 0 0 10px 10px;
}
<div class="container">
  <div class="item"></div>
  <div class="item"></div>
  <div class="item"></div>
  <div class="item"></div>
</div>

  • 6
    This wouldn't work if the items are wrapped, since :last-child does not affect every last child at the end of a line, correct? – Flimm Jun 23 '17 at 11:01
  • 2
    @Flimm I added an approach to work with flex wrap, see the second part above. – Stickers Feb 23 at 4:10
17

I have found a solution that is based on the general sibling selector, ~, and allows infinite nesting.

See this code pen for a working example

Basically, inside of column containers, every child that is preceded by another child gets a top margin. Likewise, inside every row container, every child that is preceded by another gets a left margin.

.box {
  display: flex;
  flex-grow: 1;
  flex-shrink: 1;
}

.box.columns {
  flex-direction: row;
}

.box.columns>.box~.box {
  margin-left: 5px;
}

.box.rows {
  flex-direction: column;
}

.box.rows>.box~.box {
  margin-top: 5px;
}
<div class="box columns">
  <div class="box" style="background-color: red;"></div>
  <div class="box rows">
    <div class="box rows">
      <div class="box" style="background-color: blue;"></div>
      <div class="box" style="background-color: orange;"></div>
      <div class="box columns">
        <div class="box" style="background-color: yellow;"></div>
        <div class="box" style="background-color: pink;"></div>
      </div>
    </div>
    <div class="box" style="background-color: green;"></div>
  </div>
</div>

  • This results in different sized items due to the margins not being globally applied. – Steven Vachon May 13 '16 at 19:56
  • You will also need to add some extra CSS to handle smaller screens as it looks a bit weird on mobile, I would apply the .box ~ .box rule to larger screens and for smaller screens set the .box class to have a max-width of 100% and a margin bottom. – rhysclay Jun 20 '17 at 1:24
14

Moving on from sawa's answer, here's a slightly improved version that allows you to set a fixed spacing between the items without the surrounding margin.

http://jsfiddle.net/chris00/s52wmgtq/49/

Also included is the Safari "-webkit-flex" version.

.outer1 {
    background-color: orange;
    padding: 10px;
}

.outer0 {
    background-color: green;
    overflow: hidden;
}

.container
{
    display: flex;
    display: -webkit-flex;
    flex-wrap: wrap;    
    -webkit-flex-wrap: wrap;
    background-color: rgba(0, 0, 255, 0.5);
    margin-left: -10px;
    margin-top: -10px;
}

.item
{
    flex-grow: 1;
    -webkit-flex-grow: 1;
    background-color: rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.5);
    width: 100px;
    padding: 10px;
    margin-left: 10px;
    margin-top: 10px;
    text-align: center;
    color: white;
}

<div class="outer1">
    <div class="outer0">
        <div class="container">
            <div class="item">text</div>
            <div class="item">text</div>
            <div class="item">text</div>
            <div class="item">text</div>
            <div class="item">text</div>
            <div class="item">text</div>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>
  • 2
    Isn't this essentially the same as the example given in the question? – ford Apr 6 '16 at 15:12
9

I have used this for wrapped and fixed width columns. The key here is calc()

SCSS sample

$gap: 10px;

dl {
  display: flex;
  flex-wrap: wrap;
  padding: $gap/2;

  dt, dd {
    margin: $gap/2;}

  dt { // full width, acts as header
    flex: 0 0 calc(100% - #{$gap});}

  dd { // default grid: four columns 
    flex: 0 0 calc(25% - #{$gap});}

  .half { // hall width columns
    flex: 0 0 calc(50% - #{$gap});}

}

Full Codepen sample

  • 2
    This still adds a gutter before the first and after the last item, which OP prevents using negative margins. – herman May 9 '16 at 2:03
  • 2
    Flexbox doesn't support calc() inside "flex" item in IE 11. – Adam Šipický Jan 12 '18 at 12:37
  • Cant be always used. imagine if there is also border needed for direct childs – Andris Aug 9 at 6:55
9

A flex container with -x (negative) margin and flex items with x (positive) margin or padding both lead to the desired visual result: Flex items have a fixed gap of 2x only between each other.

It appears to be simply a matter of preference, whether to use margin or padding on the flex items.

In this example, the flex items are scaled dynamically in order to preserve the fixed gap:

.flex-container { 
  margin: 0 -5px;
  display: flex;
  flex-flow: row wrap;
  justify-content: space-between;
}

.flex-item {
  margin: 0 5px; // Alternatively: padding: 0 5px;
  flex: 1 0 auto;
}
  • 2
    Sorry, I didn't get it. What new does your answer introduce that is not said directly in the question? – user Nov 11 '15 at 21:34
  • Firstly, i wanted to sum up that both, margin and padding on the flex-item lead to the desired result, because existing answers only mention one or the other. Secondly, i wanted to give an example, where gaps are preserved by scaling the flex-items themselves. – Tim Nov 13 '15 at 16:45
  • here's a codepen example showing this effect. codepen.io/dalgard/pen/Dbnus – pedalpete Jun 13 '16 at 8:09
8

Eventually they will add the gap property to flexbox. Until then you could use CSS grid instead which already has the gap property, and just have a single row. Nicer than dealing with margins.

5

With flexbox, creating gutters is a pain, especially when wrapping is involved.

You need to use negative margins (as shown in the question):

#box {
  display: flex;
  width: 100px;
  margin: 0 -5px;
}

... or alter the HTML (as shown in another answer):

<div class='flex-wrapper'>
  <div class='flex'>
    <div class='box'></div>
    <div class='box'></div>
            ...
  </div>
</div>

... or something else.

In any case, you need an ugly hack to make it work because flexbox doesn't provide a "flex-gap" feature (at least for now).

The issue of gutters, however, is simple and easy with CSS Grid Layout.

The Grid spec provides properties that create space between grid items, while ignoring the space between items and the container. These properties are:

  • grid-column-gap
  • grid-row-gap
  • grid-gap (the shorthand for both properties above)

Recently, the spec has been updated to conform with the CSS Box Alignment Module, which provides a set of alignment properties for use across all box models. So the properties are now:

  • column-gap
  • row-gap
  • gap (shorthand)

However, not all Grid-supporting browsers support the newer properties, so I'll use the original versions in the demo below.

Also, if spacing is needed between items and the container, padding on the container works just fine (see the third example in the demo below).

From the spec:

10.1. Gutters: the row-gap, column-gap, and gap properties

The row-gap and column-gap properties (and their gap shorthand), when specified on a grid container, define the gutters between grid rows and grid columns. Their syntax is defined in CSS Box Alignment 3 §8 Gaps Between Boxes.

The effect of these properties is as though the affected grid lines acquired thickness: the grid track between two grid lines is the space between the gutters that represent them.

.box {
  display: inline-grid;
  grid-auto-rows: 50px;
  grid-template-columns: repeat(4, 50px);
  border: 1px solid black;
}

.one {
  grid-column-gap: 5px;
}

.two {
  grid-column-gap: 10px;
  grid-row-gap: 10px;
}

.three {
  grid-gap: 10px;
  padding: 10px;
}

.item {
  background: lightgray;
}
<div class='box one'>
  <div class='item'></div>
  <div class='item'></div>
  <div class='item'></div>
  <div class='item'></div>
</div>

<hr>

<div class='box two'>
  <div class='item'></div>
  <div class='item'></div>
  <div class='item'></div>
  <div class='item'></div>
  <div class='item'></div>
  <div class='item'></div>
  <div class='item'></div>
  <div class='item'></div>
</div>

<hr>

<div class='box three'>
  <div class='item'></div>
  <div class='item'></div>
  <div class='item'></div>
  <div class='item'></div>
  <div class='item'></div>
  <div class='item'></div>
  <div class='item'></div>
  <div class='item'></div>
</div>

More information:

4

Why not do it like this:

.item + .item {
    margin-left: 5px;
}

This uses the adjacent sibling selector, to give all .item elements, except the first one a margin-left. Thanks to flexbox, this even results in equally wide elements. This could also be done with vertically positioned elements and margin-top, of course.

  • 8
    This would work as long as the flex items are always in a single row. If wrapping is allowed then it probably won't be sufficient. – Nick F Jun 23 '16 at 14:59
4

Here's my solution, that doesn't require setting any classes on the child elements:

.flex-inline-row {
    display: inline-flex;
    flex-direction: row;
}

.flex-inline-row.flex-spacing-4px > :not(:last-child) {
    margin-right: 4px;
}

Usage:

<div class="flex-inline-row flex-spacing-4px">
  <span>Testing</span>
  <span>123</span>
</div>

The same technique can be used for normal flex rows and columns in addition to the inline example given above, and extended with classes for spacing other than 4px.

4

Using Flexbox in my solution I've used the justify-content property for the parent element (container) and I've specified the margins inside the flex-basis property of the items. Check the code snippet below:

.container {
  display: flex;
  flex-flow: row wrap;
  justify-content: space-around;
  margin-bottom: 10px;
}

.item {
  height: 50px;
  display: flex;
  justify-content: center;
  align-items: center;
  background-color: #999;
}

.item-1-4 {
  flex-basis: calc(25% - 10px);
}

.item-1-3 {
  flex-basis: calc(33.33333% - 10px);
}

.item-1-2 {
  flex-basis: calc(50% - 10px);
}
<div class="container">
  <div class="item item-1-4">1</div>
  <div class="item item-1-4">2</div>
  <div class="item item-1-4">3</div>
  <div class="item item-1-4">4</div>
</div>
<div class="container">
  <div class="item item-1-3">1</div>
  <div class="item item-1-3">2</div>
  <div class="item item-1-3">3</div>
</div>
<div class="container">
  <div class="item item-1-2">1</div>
  <div class="item item-1-2">2</div>
</div>

3

I often use the + operator for such cases

#box {
  display: flex;
  width: 100px;
}
.item {
  background: gray;
  width: 50px;
  height: 50px;
}
.item + .item {
    margin-left: 5px;
}
<div id='box'>
  <div class='item'></div>
  <div class='item'></div>
  <div class='item'></div>
  <div class='item'></div>
</div>

2

Columnify - A solo class for N columns

Flexbox and SCSS

.columnify {
  display: flex;

  > * {
    flex: 1;

    &:not(:first-child) {
      margin-left: 2rem;
    }
  }
}

Flexbox and CSS

.columnify {
  display: flex;
}

.columnify > * {
  flex: 1;
}

.columnify > *:not(:first-child) {
  margin-left: 2rem;
}
<div class="columnify">
  <div style="display: inline-block; height: 20px; background-color: blue;"></div>
  <div style="display: inline-block; height: 20px; background-color: blue"></div>
  <div style="display: inline-block; height: 20px; background-color: blue"></div>
</div>

Play with it on JSFiddle.

1

I find the easiest way of doing this is with percentages and just allowing the margin to tally up your width

This means you end up with something like this if you where using your example

#box {
   display: flex;
}

.item {
   flex: 1 1 23%;
   margin: 0 1%;
}

Does mean your values are based on the width though which might not be good for everybody.

1

#box {
  display: flex;
  width: 100px;
}
.item {
  background: gray;
  width: 50px;
  height: 50px;
}
/* u mean utility */
.u-gap-10 > *:not(:last-child) {
  margin-right: 10px;
}
<div id='box' class="u-gap-10">
  <div class='item'></div>
  <div class='item'></div>
  <div class='item'></div>
  <div class='item'></div>
</div>

1

Here's a grid of card UI elements with spacing completed using flexible box:

enter image description here

I was frustrated with manually spacing the cards by manipulating padding and margins with iffy results. So here's the combinations of CSS attributes I've found very effective:

.card-container {
  width: 100%;
  height: 900px;
  overflow-y: scroll;
  max-width: inherit;
  background-color: #ffffff;
  
  /*Here's the relevant flexbox stuff*/
  display: flex;
  flex-direction: row;
  justify-content: center;
  align-items: flex-start;
  flex-wrap: wrap; 
}

/*Supplementary styles for .card element*/
.card {
  width: 120px;
  height: 120px;
  background-color: #ffeb3b;
  border-radius: 3px;
  margin: 20px 10px 20px 10px;
}
<section class="card-container">
        <div class="card">

        </div>
        <div class="card">

        </div>
        <div class="card">

        </div>
        <div class="card">

        </div>
      </section>

Hope this helps folks, present and future.

  • Update: This spacing is in effective for mobile rendering HTML elements that need a certain alignment (e.g. center, left, etc.). If you find yourself using flex box for mobile development, I've found relief in switching to purely margin-based alignment. – buildpax Aug 5 '17 at 13:53
1

Just use .item + .item in selector to match from second .item

#box {
  display: inline-flex;
  margin: 0 -5px;
}
.item {
  background: gray;
  width: 10px;
  height: 50px;
}

#box .item + .item {
  margin-left: 10px;
}
<div id='box'>
  <div class='item'></div>
  <div class='item'></div>
  <div class='item'></div>
  <div class='item'></div>
</div>

1

Assuming:

  • You want 4 column grid layout with wrapping
  • The number of items is not necessarily a multiple of 4

Set a left margin on every item except 1st, 5th, 9th item and so on; and set fixed width on each item. If the left margin is 10px then each row will have 30px margin between 4 items, the percentage width of item can be calculated as follows:

100% / 4 - horizontal-border - horizontal-padding - left-margin * (4 - 1) / 4

This is a decent workaround for issues involving last row of flexbox.

.flex {
  display: flex;
  flex-direction: row;
  flex-wrap: wrap;
  margin: 1em 0;
  background-color: peachpuff;
}

.item {
  margin-left: 10px;
  border: 1px solid;
  padding: 10px;
  width: calc(100% / 4 - 2px - 20px - 10px * (4 - 1) / 4);
  background-color: papayawhip;
}

.item:nth-child(4n + 1) {
  margin-left: 0;
}

.item:nth-child(n + 5) {
  margin-top: 10px;
}
<div class="flex">
  <div class="item">1</div>
  <div class="item">2</div>
  <div class="item">3</div>
  <div class="item">4</div>
</div>
<div class="flex">
  <div class="item">1</div>
  <div class="item">2</div>
  <div class="item">3</div>
  <div class="item">4</div>
  <div class="item">5</div>
  <div class="item">6</div>
</div>
<div class="flex">
  <div class="item">1</div>
  <div class="item">2</div>
  <div class="item">3</div>
  <div class="item">4</div>
  <div class="item">5</div>
  <div class="item">6</div>
  <div class="item">7</div>
  <div class="item">8</div>
  <div class="item">9</div>
</div>

1

There is indeed a nice, tidy, CSS-only way to do this (that one may consider "better").

Of all the answers posted here, I only found one that uses calc() successfully (by Dariusz Sikorski). But when posed with: "but it fails if there are only 2 items in the last row" there was no solution expanded.

This solution addresses the OP's question with an alternative to negative margins and addresses the problem posed to Dariusz.

notes:

  • This example only demonstrates a 3-column layout
  • It uses calc() to let the browser do math the way it wants -- 100%/3 (although 33.3333% should work just as well), and (1em/3)*2 (although .66em should also work well).
  • It uses ::after to pad the last row if there are fewer elements than columns

.flex-container {
  display: flex;
  justify-content: space-between;
  flex-wrap: wrap;
}
.flex-container:after {
  content: "";
}
.flex-container > div,
.flex-container:after {
  box-sizing: border-box;
  width: calc((100%/3) - ((1em/3)*2));
}
.flex-container > :nth-child(n + 4) {
  margin-top: 1em;
}

/* the following is just to visualize the items */
.flex-container > div,
.flex-container:after {
  font-size: 2em;
}
.flex-container {
  margin-bottom:4em;
}
.flex-container > div {
  text-align: center;
  background-color: #aaa;
  padding: 1em;
}
.flex-container:after {
  border: 1px dashed red;
}
<h2>Example 1 (2 elements)</h2>
<div class="flex-container">
  <div>1</div>
  <div>2</div>
</div>

<h2>Example 2 (3 elements)</h2>
<div class="flex-container">
  <div>1</div>
  <div>2</div>
  <div>3</div>
</div>

Also at https://codepen.io/anon/pen/rqWagE

1

CSS gap property:

There is a new gap CSS property for multi-column, flexbox, and grid layouts that works in some browsers now! (See Can I use link 1; link 2).

#box {
  display: flex;
  width: 100px;
  background-color: red;
  gap: 10px;
}
.item {
  background: gray;
  width: 50px;
  height: 50px;
}
<div id='box'>
  <div class='item'></div>
  <div class='item'></div>
  <div class='item'></div>
  <div class='item'></div>
</div>

As of writing, this only works in Firefox sadly.

0

It won't work in every case but if you have flexible child widths (%) and know the number of items per row you can very cleanly specify the margins of the necessary elements by using nth-child selector/s.

It depends largely on what you mean by "better". This way doesn't require additional wrapper markup for child elements or negative elements - but those things both have their place.

section {
  display: block
  width: 100vw;
}
.container {
  align-content: flex-start;
  align-items: stretch;
  background-color: #ccc;
  display: flex;
  flex-flow: row wrap;
  justify-content: flex-start;
  width: 100%;
}

.child-item {
  background-color: #c00;
  margin-bottom: 2%;
  min-height: 5em;
  width: 32%;
}

.child-item:nth-child(3n-1) {
  margin-left: 2%;
  margin-right: 2%;
}
<html>
  <body>
      <div class="container">
        <div class="child-item"></div>
        <div class="child-item"></div>
        <div class="child-item"></div>
        <div class="child-item"></div>
        <div class="child-item"></div>
        <div class="child-item"></div>
        <div class="child-item"></div>
      </div>
   </body>
</html>

  • Not responsive. Works only for fixed width parent. – Green Aug 16 '17 at 7:43
  • 1
    The OP doesn't ask for a responsive solution and their example uses a fix width. Given that this uses % values it's easy to argue that this is responsive since the items will adapt to the size of the parent which is set by percentage. – jnmrobinson Aug 18 '17 at 1:35
0

I came across the same issue earlier, then stumbled upon the answer for this. Hope it will help others for future reference.

long answer short, add a border to your child flex-items. then you can specify margins between flex-items to whatever you like. In the snippet, i use black for illustration purposes, you can use 'transparent' if you like.

#box {
  display: flex;
  width: 100px;
  /* margin: 0 -5px; *remove this*/
}
.item {
  background: gray;
  width: 50px;
  height: 50px;
  /* margin: 0 5px; *remove this*/
  border: 1px solid black; /* add this */
}
.item.special{ margin: 0 10px; }
<div id='box'>
  <div class='item'></div>
  <div class='item'></div>
  <div class='item'></div>
  <div class='item'></div>
  <div class='item special'></div>
</div>

0

The negative margin trick on the box container works just great. Here is another example working great with order, wrapping and what not.

.container {
   border: 1px solid green;
   width: 200px;
   display: inline-block;
}

#box {
  display: flex;
  flex-wrap: wrap-reverse;
  margin: -10px;
  border: 1px solid red;
}
.item {
  flex: 1 1 auto;
  order: 1;
  background: gray;
  width: 50px;
  height: 50px;
  margin: 10px;
  border: 1px solid blue;
}
.first {
  order: 0;
}
<div class=container>
<div id='box'>
  <div class='item'>1</div>
  <div class='item'>2</div>
  <div class='item first'>3*</div>
  <div class='item'>4</div>
  <div class='item'>5</div>
</div>
</div>

0

I found a hack because i really need this my self.

/* grid */
.container {
  display: flex;
  flex-flow: row wrap;
  justify-content: space-between;
}

.container::after, /* this makes sure odd element goes left and not space between */
.item {
  content:"";
  width: calc(33.3333% - 20px);
  margin-bottom: 40px;
}

/* extra styling - not important */
.item {
  height: 100px;
  background: #787878;
}
<div class="container">
  <div class="item"></div>
  <div class="item"></div>
  <div class="item"></div>
  <div class="item"></div>
  <div class="item"></div>
</div>

Here's a post grid with nice flex grow categories also. I think you'd like it. See Codepen

0

I set the spacing on flex items only in the direction stablished by their container. E.g. if a flex container is set to flow from left to right (flex-direction:row) I will only set the right margin on its children, except for the last one:

.flex-lr{
    display:flex;
    flex-direction:row;
}

.flex-lr > *:not(:last-child){
    margin-right:5px;
}

This might seem to work at a first glance but wait! this shouldn't be done when justify-content is set to a value other that start or end, since all other values are already distributing the space on their own.

And what if the items wrap? Then we should add space to the proper cross axis side as well. But, how to know if a container is allowing its children to wrap? And what about wrap-reverse?

All this considerations made me think that this is not a trivial task and it requires a small step beyond.

My approach is based on the build of a brief set of classes that acts as a wrapper of flexbox. This has some benefits:

  1. It allows to "centralize" all vendor prefixes in a single point and forget about that.
  2. It allows to group flexbox properties into a single class, or even rename some of the wording used by flexbox, that sometimes may seem not much intuitive (IMHO).
  3. If I use these classes, I will be able to write other classes based on the flex properties values that they rely on. E.g. I would be able to set the spacing based on the flow direction, the cross axis alignment, wrapping, etc.

I ended up building a flexbox designer to play around with all this, to help understand myself (and others) how flexbox works and to realize how wonderful flexbox is. Plese feel free to use it following the link below:

http://algid.com/Flex-Designer

So, below you will find and abstract of the classes I use and the spacing (margin) utlity for one flow direction. You'll be able to infer the others or find them in the link provided above. Vendor prefixes have been ommited here for brevety.

/* Flex container definition */
.flex-lr{display:flex; flex-direction:row;}
.flex-tb{display:flex; flex-direction:column;}
.flex-rl{display:flex; flex-direction:row-reverse;}
.flex-bt{display:flex; flex-direction:column-reverse;}

/* Wrapping */
.wrap{flex-wrap:wrap;}
.nowrap{flex-wrap:nowrap;}
.wrap-rev{flex-wrap:wrap-reverse;}

/* Main axis alignment */
.align-start{justify-content:flex-start;}
.align-end{justify-content:flex-end;}
.align-center{justify-content:center;}
.align-between{justify-content:space-between;}
.align-around{justify-content:space-around;}
.align-evenly{justify-content:space-evenly;}

/* Cross axis alignment */
.cross-align-start{align-items:flex-start;}
.cross-align-end{align-items:flex-end;}
.cross-align-center{align-items:center;}
.cross-align-stretch{align-items:stretch;}
.cross-align-baseline{align-items:baseline;}

/* Cross axis alignment when content is wrapped */
.wrap-align-start{align-content:flex-start;}
.wrap-align-end{align-content:flex-end;}
.wrap-align-center{align-content:center;}
.wrap-align-stretch{align-content:stretch;}
.wrap-align-between{align-content:space-between;}
.wrap-align-around{align-content:space-around;}

/* Item alignment */
.item-cross-align-start{align-self:flex-start;}
.item-cross-align-end{align-self:flex-end;}
.item-cross-align-center{align-self:center;}
.item-cross-align-stretch{align-self:stretch;}
.item-cross-align-baseline{align-self:baseline;}
.item-cross-align-auto{align-self:auto;}

And now the thing that brought us here: the space between the items:

/* Flow margin (left to right) */
.flex-lr.fm-0 > *:not(:last-child){margin-right:0;}
.flex-lr.fm-1 > *:not(:last-child){margin-right:3px;}
.flex-lr.fm-2 > *:not(:last-child){margin-right:7px;}
.flex-lr.fm-3 > *:not(:last-child){margin-right:15px;}
.flex-lr.fm-4 > *:not(:last-child){margin-right:32px;}

/* Cross axis */
.flex-lr.wrap.fm-0:not(.wrap-align-stretch):not(.wrap-align-between):not(.wrap-align-around) > *, .flex-lr.wrap.fm-0.wrap-align-stretch.cross-align-stretch > * {margin-bottom:0;}
.flex-lr.wrap.fm-1:not(.wrap-align-stretch):not(.wrap-align-between):not(.wrap-align-around) > *, .flex-lr.wrap.fm-1.wrap-align-stretch.cross-align-stretch > * {margin-bottom:3px;}
.flex-lr.wrap.fm-2:not(.wrap-align-stretch):not(.wrap-align-between):not(.wrap-align-around) > *, .flex-lr.wrap.fm-2.wrap-align-stretch.cross-align-stretch > * {margin-bottom:7px;}
.flex-lr.wrap.fm-3:not(.wrap-align-stretch):not(.wrap-align-between):not(.wrap-align-around) > *, .flex-lr.wrap.fm-3.wrap-align-stretch.cross-align-stretch > * {margin-bottom:15px;}
.flex-lr.wrap.fm-4:not(.wrap-align-stretch):not(.wrap-align-between):not(.wrap-align-around) > *, .flex-lr.wrap.fm-4.wrap-align-stretch.cross-align-stretch > * {margin-bottom:32px;}

/* wrap reverse */
.flex-lr.wrap-rev.fm-0:not(.wrap-align-stretch):not(.wrap-align-between):not(.wrap-align-around) > *, .flex-lr.wrap-rev.fm-0.wrap-align-stretch.cross-align-stretch > * {margin-top:0;}
.flex-lr.wrap-rev.fm-1:not(.wrap-align-stretch):not(.wrap-align-between):not(.wrap-align-around) > *, .flex-lr.wrap-rev.fm-1.wrap-align-stretch.cross-align-stretch > * {margin-top:3px;}
.flex-lr.wrap-rev.fm-2:not(.wrap-align-stretch):not(.wrap-align-between):not(.wrap-align-around) > *, .flex-lr.wrap-rev.fm-2.wrap-align-stretch.cross-align-stretch > * {margin-top:7px;}
.flex-lr.wrap-rev.fm-3:not(.wrap-align-stretch):not(.wrap-align-between):not(.wrap-align-around) > *, .flex-lr.wrap-rev.fm-3.wrap-align-stretch.cross-align-stretch > * {margin-top:15px;}
.flex-lr.wrap-rev.fm-4:not(.wrap-align-stretch):not(.wrap-align-between):not(.wrap-align-around) > *, .flex-lr.wrap-rev.fm-4.wrap-align-stretch.cross-align-stretch > * {margin-top:32px;}

Finally, this is how the markup would look like:

<div class="flex-lr cross-align-center fm-3">
    <div>
        Some content here...
    </div>
    <div>
        A bit more stuff here...
    </div>
    <div class="flex-tb fm-3">
        <div>
            Now vertical content
        </div>
        <div>
            etc.
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

This is what I call code out loud.

protected by TylerH Feb 21 at 15:27

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