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I've been working with a small group of people on a coding project for fun. It's an organized and fairly cohesive group. The people I work with all have various skill sets related to programming, but some of them use older or outright wrong methods, such as excessive global variables, poor naming conventions, and other things. While things work, the implementation is poor. What's a good way to politely ask or introduce them to use better methodology, without it coming across as questioning (or insulting) their experience and/or education?

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  • Max, is that you? Never mind, I can tell it's you by that TF2 Engineer icon you always use. Are you saying my code is crappy? ... ... ... ... the things I say when it's 5 minutes until I leave work and have nothing left to do.
    – Powerlord
    Oct 15, 2008 at 20:28
  • I'm not trying to single out any specific incident, nor am I trying to say my code is perfect and awesome, it's just that I feel this is a tricky subject, and I'm very interested in second opinions regarding this matter. Oct 15, 2008 at 20:34
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    i suppose giggling every time you glance at their screen is out of the question... Oct 15, 2008 at 20:46
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    Is rolling back each of their commits with a message of "I think it's best if we all just pretend this never happened" an option?
    – Draemon
    Oct 15, 2008 at 21:20
  • If you haven't formally agreed upon code quality characteristics and a naming convention, then you can't rightly say that what they're doing is bad or wrong, but you could address it by calling it unconventional, and that you'd like to bring the team to comply with a standardized convention. Make sure to bring everyone into that decision and make sure everyone has input and understands what they are agreeing to. Dec 4, 2014 at 16:43

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Not that I'm really adding all that much to this, but I have to agree that the two most important things to consider in your approach to this are to explain your reasoning, and to allow the coder in question to explain their reasoning. Bad code doesn't come from nowhere (and, yes, "bad code" is certainly a term up for discussion - I'm somewhat assuming in this situation that you are in a position to define what constitutes good vs. bad code).

I've found that a questioning, educational approach works well with my team. I try to never say "do it like this" without any discussion or explanation as to why.

And while you should be somewhat sensitive about it, you can't sugar coat the issue. The ideal is that your team is thinking about the code they're writing, not just in terms of what the code is doing but in how it's written.

Lastly, I'd add that there are numerous books worth exploring on the topic - my favourite at this point is "Framework Design Guidelines" by Brad Abrams and Krystof Kwalina (et al), of the .NET BCL team at Microsoft. It does an amazing job of discussing and explaining the decisions that were made, and showcases places where the guidelines weren't followed internally and the fallout that resulted.

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In front of him just refactor his code and show the difference between the two versions. Definitely he will like that.

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I would suggest taking a positive approach to the issue. Instead of accusing your coworker(s) of using bad style, make some suggestions about style and commenting guidelines that your entire team could follow.

For example, if you guys are primarily a .NET shop, suggest adhering to Microsoft's C# style and commenting guidelines since this would put you more in line with the standard practices for that community.

You can also point out some of the examples to adhering to a unified code style--for example, if someone who isn't familiar with the code base looks through it, they don't have to decipher multiple styles. Think of it like this: if you were reading a book and it were easy to tell that each chapter had been written by a different person, might you be confused after a few chapters?

I think that the important thing is not to criticize your colleagues in a negative way. It's best to sell someone on the benefits of change and much easier than convincing them that they write crappy code.

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I really liked EnderMB's answer, but I wanted to add to that:

Cultivate an environment where discussion of code quality is encouraged rather than seen as sensitive or taboo. For example, I've worked on an open source project (a Python library) where new code and bugfixes are frequently discussed with the group. Not only is it OK to say "hey, I think it's better to do it this way" but that's actually encouraged and part of the process we use for maintaining high quality code.

I realize not every environment is conducive to this kind of process, but it has really worked well for us. Every code commit doesn't have to be a committee meeting, but it should hopefully be perfectly acceptable for you to discuss questionable or non-optimal code and look for improvement. After all, better code is better for everyone on the team, and a major concept of teamwork is working together instead of as a loose group of individuals.

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It is important to motivate and coach people and be show respect even if someone obviously does mistakes. But there should be the way not only to coach but also to state that mistake is mistake. Bad code should be done better. It is not optional. And employee should be aware which code is ok and which not ok from point of view of his supervisor. It is still supposed to be done with respect and motivate those who are accountable to improve.

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Depends on the programmer. Some guys actually like to hear "that sucks" because they knew the code smelled but weren't sure why.

Other programmers need to be babied a little more. I find telling them something is bad is good; "that's not a good way to write code" followed by a bit of coaching "here, see if we do this it's more readable/less warnings/whatever". It's the constructive criticism that helps; if you can't put your money where your mouth is and actually do it better you're best not to comment, even if you know it's bad.

The only person that both approaches have failed on was a stubbon admin assistant who was writing enormous macros in VBscript and going about everything backwards. She actually had the gall to tell me that I didn't know anything about computer programming and that I could stand to learn from her 1337 sk1l50rz.

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It totally depends on the culture you're writing in. In a free software project, you tell them they're writing bad code with positive suggestions, ways to improve it and feedback. You can also send them a patch to their code.

A friendly email never hurts, either.

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In my experience, there was a time when we wanted to change a windows application to a web application and optimize the same, as it is easier to update and maintain. But since my friend was a major contributor to the windows application, he disallowed change and then the rest is history.

Moral : Giving importance to the organizations' objective more than one's own for the benefit of code optimization and better maintenance will play an important role in any programming environment.

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