34

Ruby 2.0 supports keyword arguments. I was wondering, what are the 'rules' for mixing regular with keyword arguments? Something like this would not work:

def some_method(a: 'first', b: 'second', c)
  [a, b, c]
end

but this will:

def some_method(c, a: 'first', b: 'second')
  [a, b, c]
end

So why does putting a regular argument before the keyword arguments (and not after) works?

Is there some reference on the web on this (mixing keyword and regular arguments)? I can't seem to find any.

17

A pseudo-regex for parameter lists in Ruby (this applies equally to methods, blocks and lambda literals) is something like this:

mand* opt* splat? mand* (mand_kw | opt_kw)* ksplat? block?

Here's an example:

def foo(m1, m2, o1=:o1, o2=:o2, *splat, m3, m4, 
          ok1: :ok1, mk1:, mk2:, ok2: :ok2, **ksplat, &blk)
  Hash[local_variables.map {|var| [var, eval(var.to_s)] }]
end

method(:foo).arity
# => -5

method(:foo).parameters
# => [[:req, :m1], [:req, :m2], [:opt, :o1], [:opt, :o2], [:rest, :splat], 
#     [:req, :m3], [:req, :m4], [:keyreq, :mk1], [:keyreq, :mk2], 
#     [:key, :ok1], [:key, :ok2], [:keyrest, :ksplat], [:block, :blk]]

foo(1, 2, 3, 4)
# ArgumentError: missing keywords: mk1, mk2

foo(1, 2, 3, mk1: 4, mk2: 5)
# ArgumentError: wrong number of arguments (3 for 4+)

foo(1, 2, 3, 4, mk1: 5, mk2: 6)
# => { m1: 1, m2: 2, o1: :o1, o2: :o2, splat: [], m3: 3, m4: 4, 
#      ok1: :ok1, mk1: 5, mk2: 6, ok2: :ok2, ksplat: {}, 
#      blk: nil }

foo(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, mk1: 6, mk2: 7)
# => { m1: 1, m2: 2, o1: 3, o2: :o2, splat: [], m3: 4, m4: 5, 
#      ok1: :ok1, mk1: 6, mk2: 7, ok2: :ok2, ksplat: {}, 
#      blk: nil }

foo(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, mk1: 7, mk2: 8)
# => { m1: 1, m2: 2, o1: 3, o2: 4, splat: [], m3: 5, m4: 6, 
#      ok1: :ok1, mk1: 7, mk2: 8, ok2: :ok2, ksplat: {}, 
#      blk: nil }

foo(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, mk1: 8, mk2: 9)
# => { m1: 1, m2: 2, o1: 3, o2: 4, splat: [5], m3: 6, m4: 7, 
#      ok1: :ok1, mk1: 8, mk2: 9, ok2: :ok2, ksplat: {}, 
#      blk: nil }

foo(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, mk1: 9, mk2: 10)
# => { m1: 1, m2: 2, o1: 3, o2: 4, splat: [5, 6], m3: 7, m4: 8, 
#      ok1: :ok1, mk1: 9, mk2: 10, ok2: :ok2, ksplat: {}, 
#      blk: nil }

foo(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, ok1: 9, mk1: 10, mk2: 11)
# => { m1: 1, m2: 2, o1: 3, o2: 4, splat: [5, 6], m3: 7, m4: 8, 
#      ok1: 9, mk1: 10, mk2: 11, ok2: :ok2, ksplat: {}, 
#      blk: nil }

foo(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, ok1: 9, mk1: 10, mk2: 11, ok2: 12)
# => { m1: 1, m2: 2, o1: 3, o2: 4, splat: [5, 6], m3: 7, m4: 8, 
#      ok1: 9, mk1: 10, mk2: 11, ok2: 12, ksplat: {}, 
#      blk: nil }

foo(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, ok1: 9, mk1: 10, mk2: 11, ok2: 12, k3: 13)
# => { m1: 1, m2: 2, o1: 3, o2: 4, splat: [5, 6], m3: 7, m4: 8, 
#      ok1: 9, mk1: 10, mk2: 11, ok2: 12, ksplat: {k3: 13}, 
#      blk: nil }

foo(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 
      ok1: 9, mk1: 10, mk2: 11, ok2: 12, k3: 13, k4: 14)
# => { m1: 1, m2: 2, o1: 3, o2: 4, splat: [5, 6], m3: 7, m4: 8, 
#      ok1: 9, mk1: 10, mk2: 11, ok2: 12, ksplat: {k3: 13, k4: 14}, 
#      blk: nil }

foo(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 
      ok1: 9, ok2: 10, mk1: 11, mk2: 12, k3: 13, k4: 14) do 15 end
# => { m1: 1, m2: 2, o1: 3, o2: 4, splat: [5, 6], m3: 7, m4: 8, 
#      ok1: 9, mk1: 10, mk2: 11, ok2: 12, ksplat: {k3: 13, k4: 14}, 
#      blk: #<Proc:0xdeadbeefc00l42@(irb):15> }

[Note: mandatory keyword arguments will be introduced in Ruby 2.1, all the rest already works.]

  • I like the pseudo-regex notation, very clear! – Patrick Oscity Dec 17 '13 at 13:05
  • Very useful, thanks. – daremkd Dec 20 '13 at 12:46
  • 4
    If you're a newb like me and this answer makes no sense, make sure you scroll down to @PatrickOscity's answer. – sixty4bit Mar 10 '15 at 19:06
44

The order is as follows:

  • required arguments
  • arguments with default values (arg=default_value notation)
  • optional arguments (*args notation, sometimes called "splat parameter")
  • required arguments, again
  • keyword arguments
    • optional (arg:default_value notation, since 2.0.0)
    • intermixed with required (arg: notation, since 2.1.0)
  • arbitrary keyword arguments (**args notation, since 2.0.0)
  • block argument (&blk notation)

For example:

def test(a, b=0, *c, d, e:1, f:, **g, &blk)
  puts "a = #{a}"
  puts "b = #{b}"
  puts "c = #{c}"
  puts "d = #{d}"
  puts "e = #{e}"
  puts "f = #{f}"
  puts "g = #{g}"
  puts "blk = #{blk}"
end

test(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, e:6, f:7, foo:'bar') { puts 'foo' }
# a = 1
# b = 2
# c = [3, 4]
# d = 5
# e = 6
# f = 7
# g = {:foo=>"bar"}
# blk = #<Proc:0x007fb818ba3808@(irb):24>

More detailed information is available from the official Ruby Syntax Documentation.

  • Forgot about "arbitrary keyword arguments" with the ** notation, so I added these, too. – Patrick Oscity Dec 17 '13 at 12:32
  • You can also have mandatory parameters after the splat. And in Ruby 2.1, you can also have mandatory keyword parameters, which can be freely intermixed with optional keyword parameters. See stackoverflow.com/a/20634180/2988 – Jörg W Mittag Dec 17 '13 at 12:35
  • @JörgWMittag thanks! I've also noticed that skimming through the docs. Added it to the list. – Patrick Oscity Dec 17 '13 at 13:04
  • 2
    Thanks, this was more helpful to me than the accepted answer. I know that says more about me than it does about the accepted answer, but there you go :) – sixty4bit Mar 10 '15 at 19:09
2
  1. Arguments with defaults and splat argument must be grouped together;
  2. Splat argument must appear after positional arguments with default values but before keyword arguments;
  3. Keyword arguments must appear after positional arguments and before double splat argument;
  4. Double splat argument must appear last but before block argument.

    def foo(a, b=1, c=2, *d, e, f: 1, g: 2, **kwargs, &block)

-1

Keyword arguments is just an optional hash argument, as I know.

def some_method(c, a: 'first', b: 'second')

is same as

def some_method(c, { a: 'first', b: 'second' }) // will not compile actually

Ruby just interprets last arguments with hash syntax as hash. So the first example doesn't work because ruby can't understand such syntax (has syntax at first place).

  • It is not. You can change the orders of keyword parameters on invocation. – Isaiah Feb 17 '15 at 14:49
  • What do you try to say? Read the other answers too, please. There is no 'keyword arguments'. All named parameters are eventually hashes. And I didn't say anything about order. The order does matter the same way it is matters for any regular hash. If you use its keys directly it doesn't matter and you can change the order as you like. – Arantir Feb 18 '15 at 1:45
  • Keyword parameter should be mandatory as well, they are not the same thing, with hash argument, you have to do a hash lookup, but not with the former. – Isaiah Aug 14 '15 at 9:02

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