What is the difference between =, ==, and ===?

I think using one equal sign is to declare a variable while two equal signs is for a comparison condition and lastly three equal signs is for comparing values of declared variables.

  • check out the example ... I have posted it would clarify more things .. – InfantPro'Aravind' Jan 14 '10 at 10:55
  • 1
    For advanced PHP users, knowing the difference between == and === and asking themself "is it faster to compare with == or with === when I'm sure that both the operands are the same type?", please look at my benchmark script below. – lucaferrario Jul 8 '13 at 14:04
  • @Strawberry I feel the question's tag should also include the javascript tag since it also applies to that language. – Funk Forty Niner Jun 11 '16 at 18:35
  • (Update): I have added the javascript tag in an edit, since there have been quite a few questions where people were using = in javascript. That doesn't only apply to PHP but other languages also. – Funk Forty Niner Jun 11 '16 at 19:09
  • I went ahead and deleted the JavaScript tag: all answers here are only about PHP (except the latest which is very weak), there are differences between how the languages handle it, and there is already a similar de facto canonical JavaScript question (Which equals operator (== vs ===) should be used in JavaScript comparisons?). – JJJ May 16 at 10:34
up vote 157 down vote accepted

You have = the assignment operator, == the 'equal' comparison operator and === the 'identical' comparison operator.

$a = $b     Assign      Sets $a to be equal to $b.
$a == $b    Equal       TRUE if $a is equal to $b.
$a === $b   Identical   TRUE if $a is equal to $b, and they are of the same type. (introduced in PHP 4)

For more info on the need for == and ===, and situations to use each, look at the docs.

  • when I compare two identical datetime, I have false result, why ? example : sandbox.onlinephpfunctions.com/code/… – stloc Jan 8 '16 at 9:20
  • @stloc, === with objects tells you if they are the same object, not if they have the same content. – Andrea Jan 27 '16 at 20:22
  • Introduced in PHP4, funny in Y2018 ;-) – Mvorisek Jul 13 at 15:36
  • = is the assignment operator
  • == is the comparison operator (checks if two variables have equal values)
  • === is the identical comparison operator (checks if two variables have equal values and are of the same type).

= assignment operator

== checks if two variables have the same value

=== checks if two variables have the same value AND if their types are the same

  • 1
    Also know about != and !== 'not' versions of the two comparison operators. Some languages use := as assignment, just to avoid this kind of confusion. – Phil Perry Aug 21 '13 at 16:57

For advanced PHP users, knowing the difference between ==and === and asking themselves "is it faster to compare with == or with === when I'm sure that both the operands are the same type?"

The short and general answer is: There is no performance gain in using === in this cases, so you should probably use ==.

For the ones interested in benchmarking it themselves, you can use the following code I wrote ad-hoc and try different values for $a and $b:

<?php
    // CONFIGURATION
    $cycles = 1000000;
    $a = 'random string 1';
    $b = 'random string 2';

    // FUNCTIONS
    function compare_two_equals($a, $b) {
        if ($a == $b) {
            return TRUE;
        } else {
            return FALSE;
        }
    }

    function compare_three_equals($a, $b) {
        if ($a === $b) {
            return TRUE;
        } else {
            return FALSE;
        }
    }

    // EXECUTION
    $time = microtime(TRUE);
    for ($count_a = 0; $count_a < $cycles; $count_a++) {
        compare_two_equals($a, $b);
    }
    $time_two_a = microtime(TRUE) - $time;
    $time = microtime(TRUE);
    for ($count_a = 0; $count_a < $cycles; $count_a++) {
        compare_three_equals($a, $b);
    }
    $time_three_a = microtime(TRUE) - $time;
    $time = microtime(TRUE);
    for ($count_a = 0; $count_a < $cycles; $count_a++) {
        compare_two_equals($a, $b);
    }
    $time_two_b = microtime(TRUE) - $time;
    $time = microtime(TRUE);
    for ($count_a = 0; $count_a < $cycles; $count_a++) {
        compare_three_equals($a, $b);
    }
    $time_three_b = microtime(TRUE) - $time;
    $time = microtime(TRUE);

    // RESULTS PRINTING
    print "<br />\nCOMPARE == (FIRST TRY): " . number_format($time_two_a, 3) . " seconds";
    print "<br />\nCOMPARE == (SECOND TRY): " . number_format($time_two_b, 3) . " seconds";
    print "<br />\nCOMPARE === (FIRST TRY): " . number_format($time_three_a, 3) . " seconds";
    print "<br />\nCOMPARE === (SECOND TRY): " . number_format($time_three_b, 3) . " seconds";
?>

NOTE: The comparison is valid only when each "FIRST TRY" is very close to its "SECOND TRY". If they are significantly different, it means that the processor was busy doing something else while executing the comparisons and so the results are unreliable and the benchmark should be run again.

  • 8
    Microbenchmarks like this are not very reliable. It is also highly unlikely that you'd ever want to worry about == or === as the cause of your performance problem. IMO: It's better to be strict (===) unless you explicitly want to be loose (==) about your comparisons. The number of strange edge cases i.e. "5 is not a number" == 5 can lead to wacky bugs. === never suffers from this problem. – gnarf Nov 12 '13 at 5:00
  • My test was to tell programmers that if they're choosing === for performance reasons, they're wrong. So programmers are free to choose === or == based on logical reasons but not on performance reasons: there are different cases to prefer the one or the other and performance must not be taken into account at all. – lucaferrario Feb 18 '16 at 15:40

protected by Rizier123 Jun 18 '15 at 16:50

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