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I've found a lot of info on sanitizing, filtering, and validating forms when it comes to simple inputs like email, phone numbers, addresses, etc.

But the security of your app is only as strong as your weakest link. What if your form also includes a large textarea, lets say, that you want your users to be able to write flexible, html readable entries?

For example this textarea on StackOverflow allows you to format text, include links, pictures, etc when you are asking a question or submitting an answer. Stack overflow takes user's inputs, put it into their database, then display it on the web: pictures, links, and all. Which means they have to allow html tags, special characters, and the like. How do they, and how can I, make sure there is no malicious content being put into my database?

To get specific, here are the security implementations I've added to my web app:

  1. PDO Prepared Statements when working with dynamic database inputs
  2. Limited my production site's database access to a user with less privileges (so if someone does gain control, they'll only be able to update, insert, or select)
  3. Client-side validation (pretty much useless in this context, it's just for users' convenience)
  4. Using POST, not GET
  5. Turned error_display off, so malicious users can't probe

I know the best practice is to filter and validate the POST[] using server-side validation, but doing that will limit what my users can submit. For example, filtering out all html tags will disable links, images, and formatting. Same problem with output filtering with htmlentities. Maybe there is a more nuanced way to do it?

What else can I do to secure this?

I should add: There will be a moderation process before any output is displayed. Each user entry will have a pair of eyes looking at it before it is allowed to be put on the website. That takes care of output filtering, but input filtering is still an issue.

  • Maybe you ask your question on codereview.stackexchange.com? – Sergey Dec 18 '13 at 6:12
  • However, the question title is misleading. There is NO difference in processing large or small inputs. All have to be processed the same. The only difference is allowed HTML, but it is not reflected in the title – Your Common Sense Dec 18 '13 at 7:28
  • I've edited the title to reflect that, and added the HTML tag. – Kev Dec 18 '13 at 16:25
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PDO Prepared Statements when working with dynamic database inputs

right

Limited my production site's database access to a user with less privileges (so if someone does gain control, they'll only be able to update, insert, or select)

useless

Client-side validation (pretty much useless in this context, it's just for users' convenience)

useless

Using POST, not GET

irrelevant

Turned error_display off, so malicious users can't probe

right

There is no item in your list regarding HTML issues. If you want to allow formatted input, you have to use either BB-code or HTML purifier or something of the sort.

  • I've looked into HTML purifier. It looks like a good solution for cleaning up the inputs before they reach my database (much better than BB-code). – Kev Dec 18 '13 at 16:53

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