26

SciPy has three methods for doing 1D integrals over samples (trapz, simps, and romb) and one way to do a 2D integral over a function (dblquad), but it doesn't seem to have methods for doing a 2D integral over samples -- even ones on a rectangular grid.

The closest thing I see is scipy.interpolate.RectBivariateSpline.integral -- you can create a RectBivariateSpline from data on a rectangular grid and then integrate it. However, that isn't terribly fast.

I want something more accurate than the rectangle method (i.e. just summing everything up). I could, say, use a 2D Simpson's rule by making an array with the correct weights, multiplying that by the array I want to integrate, and then summing up the result.

However, I don't want to reinvent the wheel if there's already something better out there. Is there?

4 Answers 4

26

Use the 1D rule twice.

>>> from scipy.integrate import simps
>>> import numpy as np
>>> x = np.linspace(0, 1, 20)
>>> y = np.linspace(0, 1, 30)
>>> z = np.cos(x[:,None])**4 + np.sin(y)**2
>>> simps(simps(z, y), x)
0.85134099743259539
>>> import sympy
>>> xx, yy = sympy.symbols('x y')
>>> sympy.integrate(sympy.cos(xx)**4 + sympy.sin(yy)**2, (xx, 0, 1), (yy, 0, 1)).evalf()
0.851349922021627
3
  • 1
    Good call. For my problem, I keep integrating over arrays of the same dimension, so it's faster for me to create a weight array for simpson's rule (call the array simp) and do sum(simp*z) -- since I only have to define simp once. Still, the double simps method is good to know.
    – lnmaurer
    Dec 19, 2013 at 17:42
  • Is there a way to do it in 3D??
    – chemeng
    Dec 3, 2014 at 1:46
  • 2
    This is true because the function to integrate is really f(x,y)=g(x)+h(y), and the results is correct because the integration interval is [0,1]x[0,1].
    – David GG
    Jul 2, 2019 at 21:11
3

If you are dealing with a true two dimensional integral over a rectangle you would have something like this

>>> import numpy as np
>>> from scipy.integrate import simps
>>> x_min,x_max,n_points_x = (0,1,50)
>>> y_min,y_max,n_points_y = (0,5,50)
>>> x = np.linspace(x_min,x_max,n_points_x)
>>> y = np.linspace(y_min,y_max,n_points_y)
>>> def F(x,y):
>>>     return x**4 * y
# We reshape to use broadcasting
>>> zz = F(x.reshape(-1,1),y.reshape(1,-1))
>>> zz.shape 
(50,50)
# We first integrate over x and then over y
>>> simps([simps(zz_x,x) for zz_x in zz],y) 
2.50005233

You can compare with the true result which is

3

trapz can be done in 2D in the following way. Draw a grid of points schematically,

enter image description here

The integral over the whole grid is equal to the sum of the integrals over small areas dS. Trapezoid rule approximates the integral over a small rectangle dS as the area dS multiplied by the average of the function values in the corners of dS which are the grid points:

∫ f(x,y) dS = (f1 + f2 + f3 + f4)/4

where f1, f2, f3, f4 are the array values in the corners of the rectangle dS.

Observe that each internal grid point enters the formula for the whole integral four times as it is common for four rectangles. Each point on the side that is not in the corner, enters twice as it is common for two rectangles, and each corner point enters only once. Therefore, the integral is calculated in numpy via the following function:

def double_Integral(xmin, xmax, ymin, ymax, nx, ny, A):

    dS = ((xmax-xmin)/(nx-1)) * ((ymax-ymin)/(ny-1))

    A_Internal = A[1:-1, 1:-1]

    # sides: up, down, left, right
    (A_u, A_d, A_l, A_r) = (A[0, 1:-1], A[-1, 1:-1], A[1:-1, 0], A[1:-1, -1])

    # corners
    (A_ul, A_ur, A_dl, A_dr) = (A[0, 0], A[0, -1], A[-1, 0], A[-1, -1])

    return dS * (np.sum(A_Internal)\
                + 0.5 * (np.sum(A_u) + np.sum(A_d) + np.sum(A_l) + np.sum(A_r))\
                + 0.25 * (A_ul + A_ur + A_dl + A_dr))

Testing it on the function given by David GG:

x_min,x_max,n_points_x = (0,1,50)
y_min,y_max,n_points_y = (0,5,50)
x = np.linspace(x_min,x_max,n_points_x)
y = np.linspace(y_min,y_max,n_points_y)

def F(x,y):
    return x**4 * y

zz = F(x.reshape(-1,1),y.reshape(1,-1))

print(double_Integral(x_min, x_max, y_min, y_max, n_points_x, n_points_y, zz))

2.5017353157550444

Other methods (Simpson, Romberg, etc) can be derived similarly.

0

A generalization to N-D using scipy.integrate.romb as a 1D-integrator:

def rombND(z, steps=1):
    """
    Romberg ND-integration using samples of a ND function. 
    
    See scipy.integrate.romb for details.
    
    >>> nx, ny, nz = 2**3 + 1, 2**4 + 1, 2**2 + 1
    >>> xlims, ylims, zlims = (0, 1), (0, 2), (0, 1/2)
    >>> z, y, x = np.ogrid[zlims[0]:zlims[1]:nz*1j, ylims[0]:ylims[1]:ny*1j, xlims[0]:xlims[1]:nx*1j]
    >>> dz, dy, dx = (z[-1, 0, 0] - z[0, 0, 0]) / (nz - 1), (y[0, -1, 0] - y[0, 0, 0]) / (ny - 1), (x[0, 0, -1] - x[0, 0, 0]) / (nx - 1)
    >>> integrand = (2 * x + y + z / 2)**2  # int_{x=0}^{1} int_{y=0}^{2} int_{z=0}^{1/2} = 83/16
    >>> np.isclose(rombND(integrand, (dx, dy, dz)), 83/16)
    True
    """
    
    steps = np.resize(steps, (z.ndim,))  # Make it a 1D vector
    for axis in range(z.ndim):
        step = steps[axis]
        if axis == 0:
            integral = [ romb(zz, step) for zz in z ]
        else:
            integral = romb(integral, step)
            
    return integral

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