33

I've got a dataframe, and I'm trying to append a column of sequential differences to it. I have found a method that I like a lot (and generalizes well for my use case). But I noticed one weird thing along the way. Can you help me make sense of it?

Here is some data that has the right structure (code modeled on an answer here):

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
import random
from itertools import product

random.seed(1)       # so you can play along at home
np.random.seed(2)    # ditto

# make a list of dates for a few periods
dates = pd.date_range(start='2013-10-01', periods=4).to_native_types()
# make a list of tickers
tickers = ['ticker_%d' % i for i in range(3)]
# make a list of all the possible (date, ticker) tuples
pairs = list(product(dates, tickers))
# put them in a random order
random.shuffle(pairs)
# exclude a few possible pairs
pairs = pairs[:-3]
# make some data for all of our selected (date, ticker) tuples
values = np.random.rand(len(pairs))

mydates, mytickers = zip(*pairs)
data = pd.DataFrame({'date': mydates, 'ticker': mytickers, 'value':values})

Ok, great. This gives me a frame like so:

     date        ticker      value
0    2013-10-03  ticker_2    0.435995
1    2013-10-04  ticker_2    0.025926
2    2013-10-02  ticker_1    0.549662
3    2013-10-01  ticker_0    0.435322
4    2013-10-02  ticker_2    0.420368
5    2013-10-03  ticker_0    0.330335
6    2013-10-04  ticker_1    0.204649
7    2013-10-02  ticker_0    0.619271
8    2013-10-01  ticker_2    0.299655

My goal is to add a new column to this dataframe that will contain sequential changes. The data needs to be in order to do this, but the ordering and the differencing needs to be done "ticker-wise" so that gaps in another ticker don't cause NA's for a given ticker. I want to do this without perturbing the dataframe in any other way (i.e. I do not want the resulting DataFrame to be reordered based on what was necessary to do the differencing). The following code works:

data1 = data.copy() #let's leave the original data alone for later experiments
data1.sort(['ticker', 'date'], inplace=True)
data1['diffs'] = data1.groupby(['ticker'])['value'].transform(lambda x: x.diff())
data1.sort_index(inplace=True)
data1

and returns:

     date        ticker      value       diffs
0    2013-10-03  ticker_2    0.435995    0.015627
1    2013-10-04  ticker_2    0.025926   -0.410069
2    2013-10-02  ticker_1    0.549662    NaN
3    2013-10-01  ticker_0    0.435322    NaN
4    2013-10-02  ticker_2    0.420368    0.120713
5    2013-10-03  ticker_0    0.330335   -0.288936
6    2013-10-04  ticker_1    0.204649   -0.345014
7    2013-10-02  ticker_0    0.619271    0.183949
8    2013-10-01  ticker_2    0.299655    NaN

So far, so good. If I replace the middle line above with the more concise code shown here, everything still works:

data2 = data.copy()
data2.sort(['ticker', 'date'], inplace=True)
data2['diffs'] = data2.groupby('ticker')['value'].diff()
data2.sort_index(inplace=True)
data2

A quick check shows that, in fact, data1 is equal to data2. However, if I do this:

data3 = data.copy()
data3.sort(['ticker', 'date'], inplace=True)
data3['diffs'] = data3.groupby('ticker')['value'].transform(np.diff)
data3.sort_index(inplace=True)
data3

I get a strange result:

     date        ticker     value       diffs
0    2013-10-03  ticker_2    0.435995    0
1    2013-10-04  ticker_2    0.025926   NaN
2    2013-10-02  ticker_1    0.549662   NaN
3    2013-10-01  ticker_0    0.435322   NaN
4    2013-10-02  ticker_2    0.420368   NaN
5    2013-10-03  ticker_0    0.330335    0
6    2013-10-04  ticker_1    0.204649   NaN
7    2013-10-02  ticker_0    0.619271   NaN
8    2013-10-01  ticker_2    0.299655    0

What's going on here? When you call the .diff method on a Pandas object, is it not just calling np.diff? I know there's a diff method on the DataFrame class, but I couldn't figure out how to pass that to transform without the lambda function syntax I used to make data1 work. Am I missing something? Why is the diffs column in data3 screwy? How can I have call the Pandas diff method within transform without needing to write a lambda to do it?

  • 1
    Add the sort=False flag to .groupby() please. You're stressing me out. For some reason .groupby with .diff uses heaps of memory and it's all rather inefficient and throwing an unnecessary sort in there just makes it worse. – grofte Dec 8 '17 at 23:42
  • Your question is about np.diff rather than pandas.diff. Edited your title for you. – smci Nov 14 at 0:31
32

Nice easy to reproduce example!! more questions should be like this!

Just pass a lambda to transform (this is tantamount to passing afuncton object, e.g. np.diff (or Series.diff) directly. So this equivalent to data1/data2

In [32]: data3['diffs'] = data3.groupby('ticker')['value'].transform(Series.diff)

In [34]: data3.sort_index(inplace=True)

In [25]: data3
Out[25]: 
         date    ticker     value     diffs
0  2013-10-03  ticker_2  0.435995  0.015627
1  2013-10-04  ticker_2  0.025926 -0.410069
2  2013-10-02  ticker_1  0.549662       NaN
3  2013-10-01  ticker_0  0.435322       NaN
4  2013-10-02  ticker_2  0.420368  0.120713
5  2013-10-03  ticker_0  0.330335 -0.288936
6  2013-10-04  ticker_1  0.204649 -0.345014
7  2013-10-02  ticker_0  0.619271  0.183949
8  2013-10-01  ticker_2  0.299655       NaN

[9 rows x 4 columns]

I believe that np.diff doesn't follow numpy's own unfunc guidelines to process array inputs (whereby it tries various methods to coerce input and send output, e.g. __array__ on input __array_wrap__ on output). I am not really sure why, see a bit more info here. So bottom line is that np.diff is not dealing with the index properly and doing its own calculation (which in this case is wrong).

Pandas has a lot of methods where they don't just call the numpy function, mainly because they handle different dtypes, handle nans, and in this case, handle 'special' diffs. e.g. you can pass a time frequency to a datelike-index where it calculates how many n to actually diff.

  • This is weird behaviour! – Andy Hayden Dec 19 '13 at 0:05
  • yep....it might be a bug or maybe its just a numpy weirdism (IOW their may be a reason it is this way). – Jeff Dec 19 '13 at 0:06
  • Thanks for complement. I'm new at SO, and trying to make it easy for folks like you to answer my less-than-deep questions! Did you skip my sort(['ticker', 'date'], inplace=True) step? Seems like your answer is different from mine as a result. Not a big deal, I think I get the gist of what you're saying. Any feelings about style/stability/extensibility best practices that would lead you preferring either the transform(lambda x: x.diff()) method or the blahblah.diff() method to accomplish this task? – 8one6 Dec 19 '13 at 0:13
  • 1
    @DJ_8one6 hah, I had changed it; I realized you already had the lambda solution up. A groupby like you are doing it (e.g. with data3.groupby('ticker')['value'] will pass a Series into the applied function; if you did data3.groupby('ticker').apply(...) you would get a DataFrame. That's why a lambda is nice you don't have to exiplicity reference the function as its anonymous. – Jeff Dec 19 '13 at 0:19
  • 2
    When I create a groupby I somethins do this: data3.groupby(...).apply(f) where f is : def f(x): print x; return x. To see exactly what is passing in. – Jeff Dec 19 '13 at 0:20
5

You can see that the Series .diff() method is different to np.diff():

In [11]: data.value.diff()  # Note the NaN
Out[11]: 
0         NaN
1   -0.410069
2    0.523736
3   -0.114340
4   -0.014955
5   -0.090033
6   -0.125686
7    0.414622
8   -0.319616
Name: value, dtype: float64

In [12]: np.diff(data.value.values)  # the values array of the column
Out[12]: 
array([-0.41006867,  0.52373625, -0.11434009, -0.01495459, -0.09003298,
       -0.12568619,  0.41462233, -0.31961629])

In [13]: np.diff(data.value) # on the column (Series)
Out[13]: 
0   NaN
1     0
2     0
3     0
4     0
5     0
6     0
7     0
8   NaN
Name: value, dtype: float64

In [14]: np.diff(data.value.index)  # er... on the index
Out[14]: Int64Index([8], dtype=int64)

In [15]: np.diff(data.value.index.values)
Out[15]: array([1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1])
  • Got it. Your example makes that quite clear. In my original post, I showed two methods that worked (1: involved lambda and 2: involved just using the diff method directly on a Pandas Series). Which of these do you think is more appropriate/best practice? In general, do you try to use as few lambda's as possible, or do you find they make it easier to see the structure of what's going on? – 8one6 Dec 19 '13 at 0:09
  • 1
    @DJ_8one6 actually I find lambdas surprisingly efficient in pandas (give the timing a try it's pretty negligible, though pd.Series.diff I think reads nicer)! Atm groupby.diff() is actually doing groupby.apply(pd.Series.diff), and that's usually appears to be slower. Maybe in 0.14 .diff could be made a lot faster, one of many low-hanging fruit / groupby methods. – Andy Hayden Dec 19 '13 at 0:20

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.