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After looking through a few different questions regarding this topic, I'm still stumped as to how to access another function from within an object.

window.Think = {
    initialize: function(){
        this.currentNumber = 0;
    },
    updateNumber: function(){
        this.currentNumber += 1;
    },
    listener: function(){
        document.getElementById('foo').addEventListener('click', function(){
        this.parent.updateNumber(); //this is where I want to call the prev function
    }
}

The error I'm getting is Cannot call method 'updateNumber' of undefined

How can I call Think.updateNumber() from within listener()?

share|improve this question
1  
No, this does not reference window.Think inside of the event listener callback. Also, FYI, you have a syntax error (missing a });at the end of the listener method, before the second-to-last "}") – jraede Dec 19 '13 at 1:28
    
In his code, this.parent.updateNumber(); is in a the function for the click event on #foo, so this would reference that element (if I'm not mistaken), and not window.Think – jraede Dec 19 '13 at 1:31
2  
This, people, is why indentation is important. Because of lack of proper indentation, it was totally missed there was a nested callback function. – Alex Wayne Dec 19 '13 at 1:36
    
possible duplicate of How to access the correct `this` / context inside a callback? – Felix Kling Dec 19 '13 at 1:36
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Callback functions often lose context (context is the value of this). So you have to save the value of this. to a local variable that is shared with the callback function. A common convention for this is var self = this.

listener: function(){
    var self = this;
    document.getElementById('foo').addEventListener('click', function(){
        self.updateNumber();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
If you're open to CoffeeScript, it has built in functionality for referencing the this of the parent function. You define a function with ->, and a function that retains the previous value of this with =>. Renders this issue moot. – jraede Dec 19 '13 at 1:29
1  
One of CoffeeScript's best features, but this question is not about CoffeeScript. – Alex Wayne Dec 19 '13 at 1:32
    
@jraede: ES6 arrow functions behave the same way. – Felix Kling Dec 19 '13 at 1:38
    
this is not context. It is one variable within an execution context, that is, it is associated with an execution context, it is not the context. – RobG Dec 19 '13 at 2:01
    
Callback functions never "lose context", though very often programmers do not correctly set the value of this when calling a function. – RobG Dec 19 '13 at 2:03

this will be rebound to the function's scope. The solution is creating another variable you can refer this to:

listener: function(){
    var that = this;
    document.getElementById('foo').addEventListener('click', function(){
        that.updateNumber();
    });
}

Depending on what browsers you are targeting bind might also be a solution:

listener: function(){
    document.getElementById('foo').addEventListener('click', function(){
        this.updateNumber();
    }.bind(this));
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 bind is the way to go :) – thefourtheye Dec 19 '13 at 1:40
    
@TimWolla this has nothing to do with scope, it is set by how a function is called, or bind. – RobG Dec 19 '13 at 2:03

The problem is that what the keyword "this" represent.

listener: function(){//We call this is function one.
        document.getElementById('foo').addEventListener('click', function(){//function two
        this.parent.updateNumber(); //this is where I want to call the prev function
    }

In function one,"this" represents the object Think.In function two,"this" represents the element foo.So,if you want to call the method updateNumber,you should get the reference to the object Think.We just save the "this" of function one in a variable ,like this:

listener: function(){//We call this is function one.
        var outerThis=this;//save Think here.
        document.getElementById('foo').addEventListener('click', function(){//function two
        outerThis.updateNumber();//use Think.updateNumber here.
    }

Now we get the work done. Because in javascript,the function can access it's outer function's variable,so we can use outerThis in function two.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for a good explanation that does not incorrectly use "scope" or "context". – RobG Dec 19 '13 at 2:16

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