7

What is best way to capture a smart pointer in a lambda? One attempt of mine lead to a use-after-free bug.

Example code:

#include <cstring>
#include <functional>
#include <memory>
#include <iostream>

std::function<const char *(const char *)> test(const char *input);

int main()
{
  std::cout.sync_with_stdio(false);
  std::function<const char *(const char *)> a = test("I love you");
  const char *c;
  while ((c = a(" "))){
    std::cout << c << std::endl;
  }
  return 0;
}
std::function<const char *(const char *)> test(const char *input)
{
  char* stored = strdup(input);
  char *tmpstorage = nullptr;
  std::shared_ptr<char> pointer = std::shared_ptr<char>(stored, free);
  return [=](const char * delim) mutable -> const char *
  {
    const char *b = strtok_r(stored, delim, &tmpstorage);
    stored = nullptr;
    return b;
  };
}

fails, as shown by AddressSanitizer.

  • 3
    Well, there's currently no way to capture a std::unique_ptr other than by reference, as you cannot move it in until C++14. – chris Dec 19 '13 at 7:08
  • 1
    @chris You could, however, capture the pointer handled by std::unique_ptr. – Mark Garcia Dec 19 '13 at 7:10
  • @MarkGarcia, Fair point. – chris Dec 19 '13 at 7:10
  • 1
    @MarkGarcia presumably that kind of thing is what leads to the "use after free bug". – juanchopanza Dec 19 '13 at 7:11
  • 1
    @Koushik There's std::unique_ptr::get(). – Mark Garcia Dec 19 '13 at 7:15
5

A lambda (even one with a universal capture like [=]) only actually captures variables used within its definition. Since in your example, pointer is never used inside the lambda, it's not captured and thus when it goes out of scope, it's the last shared pointer referring to stored and free() is called.

If you want to capture pointer, you could force its use:

return [=](const char * delim) mutable -> const char *
{
  pointer;
  const char *b = strtok_r(stored, delim, &tmpstorage);
  stored = nullptr;
  return b;
};

However, this is rather hackish. You want your functor stateful and with nontrivial state management. To me, this is a strong indicator an actual named class (instead of a lambda) would be in order. So I would change it like this:

std::function<const char *(const char *)> test(const char *input)
{
  struct Tokenizer
  {
    std::shared_ptr<char> pointer;
    char* stored;
    char* tmpstorage;
    explicit Tokenizer(char* stored) : pointer(stored, free), stored(stored), tmpstorage(nullptr) {}
    const char* operator() (const char * delim)
    {
      const char *b = strtok_r(stored, delim, &tmpstorage);
      stored = nullptr;
      return b;
    }
  };
  return Tokenizer(strdup(input));
}
3

Just capture the variable by value and let the copy constructor and destructor worry about ownership semantics- that's what smart pointers are for.

  • 2
    but what about unique_ptr? – Koushik Shetty Dec 19 '13 at 7:10
  • I tried that - the destructor fired too soon, and the memory was prematurely freed. – Demi Dec 19 '13 at 7:11
  • 1
    @Demetri it sounds like your smart pointer isn't that smart. What type is it? – juanchopanza Dec 19 '13 at 7:12
  • 1
    @Demetri, Could you elaborate on what exactly you did, as in show minimal code in the question? – chris Dec 19 '13 at 7:12

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