10

Today I was thinking it would be neat to make anonymous object which is type of some interface, and I have seen on SO that I am not only one.

Before I started checking out what happens I wrote some code like the one below. To my amusement it compiled, I am using .net framework 4 and I know there is no way to do anonymous objects implement interface, but I have not seen complaint from VS about this code.

Even better when I put braces intelisense is finding "Property" of my interface, just like it would be valid code.

Why is this piece compiling and when ran it is giving null reference exception?

namespace test
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Holder holder = new Holder { someInterface = { Property = 1 } };
            Console.WriteLine(holder.someInterface.Property);
        }
    }

    class Holder
    {
        public ISomeInterface someInterface{get; set;}
    }

    interface ISomeInterface
    {
        int Property { get; set; }
    }
}

4 Answers 4

10
Holder holder = new Holder { someInterface = { Property = 1 } };//<--Note you missed new keyword

Above line is equal to

Holder temp = new Holder();
temp.someInterface.Property = 1;
Holder holder = temp;// <--Here someInterface is null so you get null reference exception. 

This should be something like

Holder holder = new Holder { someInterface = new SomeClass(){ Property = 1 } };//<--Note the new keyword here

Note: Your code never introduced "Anonymous Type" It is an "Object Initializer".

When you use ObjectInitializer syntax with new keyword it means you're setting something, when you use ObjectInitializer syntax without new keyword it means you're reading something.

5
  • Good answer. FYI, this can absolutely be done with an awesome third party library I just found. stackoverflow.com/questions/9249645/… Commented Dec 19, 2013 at 14:48
  • 1
    +1 Just for sake of completeness this is described in C# 5.0 specs at §7.6.10.1 and §7.6.10.2. Commented Dec 19, 2013 at 14:49
  • @MichaelPerrenoud That was good chunk of code I found last week while looking for some feature like that:) Commented Dec 19, 2013 at 14:52
  • @Adriano Thanks, I wonder how you guys point exact part of the specification! Sometimes I don't even know what's the exact name of the feature :( Commented Dec 19, 2013 at 14:54
  • 3
    A small correction, this is equivalent to Holder temp = new Holder(); temp.someInterface.Property = 1; Holder holder = temp;. The property assignment happens before holder is initialized. Imagine if holder were a static field; you would not expect the property to be able to read that field and get the new object, right? Commented Dec 19, 2013 at 16:13
2

it would be neat to make anonymous object which is type of some interface,

I know there is no way to do anonymous objects implement interface, but I have not seen complaint from VS about this code.

The problem is, you're assuming that the following code creates a new instance of an anonymous type

new Holder { someInterface = { Property = 1 } };

{ Property = 1 } does not create a new instance of an anonymous type - this is an object initializer.

If you do replace your code with a proper instantiation of an anonymous type, then the compiler will complain that the instance cannot be implicitly converted to ISomeInterface, like you expected.

new Holder { someInterface = new { Property = 1 } };
1

It's worth noting why the compiler lets this behaviour. The reason being someInterface need not be null always. This is what object initializer syntax is translated to:

Holder temp = new Holder(); //creates temp object calling default constructor
temp.someInterface = yourValue;
holder = temp; //finally assigned back to your variable.

In your case someInterface is left uninitialized. But it need not be the case if you have your empty constructor initializing someinterface correctly.

class Holder
{
    public Holder()
    {
       someInterface = new Class();
    }

    public ISomeInterface someInterface{get; set;}
}

Now this works:

Holder holder = new Holder { someInterface = { Property = 1 } };
0

You have to assign an instance to someInterface in Holder constractor; otherwise, it will be null.

1
  • 1
    someInterface is initialized to an invalid value - which is the point of the question "why does this compile"?
    – D Stanley
    Commented Dec 19, 2013 at 14:44

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