66

I can easily add one element to an existing array:

arr = [1]
arr << 2
# => [1, 2]

How would I add multiple elements to my array?

I'd like to do something like arr << [2, 3], but this adds an array to my array #=> [1, [2, 3]]

1
  • 5
    arr.push *another_arr will add the another_arr as flattened values (will not add an array but each value)
    – MrYoshiji
    Commented Dec 19, 2013 at 16:00

7 Answers 7

75

Make use of .push

arr = [1]
arr.push(2, 3)
# => [1, 2, 3]

You can also .push() all elements of another array

second_arr = [2, 3]
arr.push(*second_arr)
# => [1, 2, 3]

But take notice! without the * it will add the second_array to arr.

arr.push(second_arr)
# => [1, [2, 3]]

Inferior alternative:

You could also chain the << calls:

arr = [1]
arr << 2 << 3
# => [1, 2, 3]
1
  • suppose you have to push a million items this would not be a good idea. Commented Aug 18, 2021 at 8:08
74

Using += operator:

arr = [1]
arr += [2, 3]
arr
# => [1, 2, 3]
1
  • 11
    Note that this doesn't add to the array; it creates a new array which is a concatenation of the left and right sides, and assigns it to arr. Commented Nov 13, 2017 at 14:03
28

You can do also as below using Array#concat:

arr = [1]
arr.concat([2, 3]) # => [1, 2, 3]
0
10

There is several methods to achieve that:

array = [1, 2]

array += [3, 4] # => [1, 2, 3, 4]

# push: put the element at the end of the array
array.push([5, 6]) # =>  [1, 2, 3, 4, [5, 6]]
array.push(*[7, 8]) # => [1, 2, 3, 4, [5, 6], 7, 8]

array << 9 # => [1, 2, 3, 4, [5, 6], 7, 8, 9]

# unshift: put the element at the beginning of the array:
array.unshift(0) #=> [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, [5, 6], 7, 8, 9]

Some links:

1

Use Array#insert can add an array to any position:

a = [1, 2, 3]
b = [4,5,6]
b.insert(0, *a)
=> [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]
0

just use .flatten

for example if you have this array

array = [1,2,3,4,5,6]

and you do this

array.push([123,456,789])
array.push([["abc","def"],["ghi","jkl"]])

your string would look something like

array = [[1,2,3,4,5,6],[123,456,789],[["abc","def"],["ghi","jkl"]]]

all you need to do is

array.flatten!

and now your array would like this

array = [1,2,3,4,5,6,123,456,789,"abc","def","ghi","jkl"]
2
  • 6
    Using flatten is not the preferred way to do this. Understanding how arrays are concatenated shows that using + or += avoids the need to use flatten at all. flatten is for those times when we get arrays that we didn't generate, or were too lazy to build correctly. Commented Dec 19, 2013 at 16:23
  • 1
    @theTinMan You're better off using a final flatten over an array of arrays built using push than using += for every concatenation. You'll get more garbage and more copying with the latter. I'd also expect O(n^2) time from the latter, and O(n) from the former. Commented Nov 13, 2017 at 14:12
-1

One more, for building up an array with items n-times you can use the splat (AKA asterisk, *):

arr = [true] * 4           # => [true, true, true, true]

You can also use the splat for repeating multiple elements:

arr = [123,'abc'] * 3      # => [123,'abc',123,'abc',123,'abc']

Of course, you can use any array operators with that, such as +:

arr = [true] * 3 + [false] # => [true, true, true, false]

I use that in conjunction with #sample to generate random weighted results:

arr.sample                 # => true 3 out of 4 times
1
  • 1
    I think the problem is that you didn't answer the question OP has asked? He specifically asked for adding values to an existing array, and you showed him how to create an array with repeated n elements. Commented Dec 4, 2019 at 15:57

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