8

Let's say I have this boolean array:

bool something[4] = {false, false, false, false};

Now, is there any simple way to check if all the values in this array is true/false at once?

Instead of doing it like this:

if(something[0] == false && something[1] == false..)
dothis();
2
  • 3
    Use a loop. Like in the duplicate above. Commented Dec 19, 2013 at 17:06
  • This question should not have been close, it is more specific than the alternative.
    – alfC
    Commented Dec 6, 2019 at 10:16

4 Answers 4

25

Use std::all_of

#include<algorithm>
...
if (std::all_of(
      std::begin(something), 
      std::end(something), 
      [](bool i)
            { 
              return i; // or return !i ;
            }
)) {
      std::cout << "All numbers are true\n";
}
9
  • @Salgar Yeah, they are. bool is an integral type -> it's a number.
    – user529758
    Commented Dec 19, 2013 at 17:09
  • I understand that, he edited his answer. It was strange before.
    – Salgar
    Commented Dec 19, 2013 at 17:14
  • 3
    stackoverflow.com/questions/1452721/…
    – Salgar
    Commented Dec 19, 2013 at 17:16
  • 3
    It would be nice to remark that all_of is only defined from C++11 on...
    – Roman Rdgz
    Commented Jul 2, 2015 at 8:38
  • 1
    Just wanted to add an approach with pointers: std::all_of(something, &something[4], [](bool b) {return b;});
    – Vinz
    Commented Nov 3, 2016 at 20:30
8

You can do this by summing:

#include <numeric> 

int sum = std::accumulate(bool_array, bool_array + 4, 0);
if(sum == 4) /* all true */;
if(sum == 0) /* all false */;

This has the advantage of finding both conditions in one pass, unlike the solution with all_of which would require two.

3
  • 4
    What about any array with millions bools and first one as false and need to check all true ? std::all_of just uses std::find_if_not
    – P0W
    Commented Dec 19, 2013 at 17:23
  • @P0W: I was assuming the question was to find both conditions, not either condition
    – Eric
    Commented Dec 19, 2013 at 17:34
  • 3
    Still you should not need to go through the whole array for either of the conditions if the first two elements are true and false respectively..
    – Moberg
    Commented Sep 11, 2017 at 9:37
6

Use a for loop.

allTrue = true;
allFalse = true;
for(int i=0;i<something.size();i++){
    if(something[i]) //a value is true
        allFalse = false; //not all values in array are false
    else //a value is false
        allTrue = false; //not all values in array are true
}

My syntax might be a bit off (haven't used C++ in a while) but this is the general pseudocode.

6

You could search for the first false flag:

bool something[n];
...

bool allTrue = (std::end(something) == std::find(std::begin(something),
                                                 std::end(something),
                                                 false) );
2
  • How does this add to the accepted answer from seven years ago?
    – DevSolar
    Commented Aug 14, 2020 at 11:18
  • 3
    @DevSolar it's a different approach. Similar to std::all_of, but different nonetheless.. Plus it doesn't need a lambda.
    – Den-Jason
    Commented Aug 14, 2020 at 12:08

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