98

I have looked around StackOverflow, but I cannot find a solution specific to my problem, which involves appending rows to an R data frame.

I am initializing an empty 2-column data frame, as follows.

df = data.frame(x = numeric(), y = character())

Then, my goal is to iterate through a list of values and, in each iteration, append a value to the end of the list. I started with the following code.

for (i in 1:10) {
    df$x = rbind(df$x, i)
    df$y = rbind(df$y, toString(i))
}

I also attempted the functions c, append, and merge without success. Please let me know if you have any suggestions.

  • 2
    I don't presume to know how R was meant to be used, but I wanted to ignore the additional line of code that would be required to update the indices on every iteration and I cannot easily preallocate the size of the data frame because I don't know how many rows it will ultimately take. Remember that the above is merely a toy example meant to be reproducible. Either way, thanks for your suggestion! – Gyan Veda Dec 19 '13 at 19:31
99

Update

Not knowing what you are trying to do, I'll share one more suggestion: Preallocate vectors of the type you want for each column, insert values into those vectors, and then, at the end, create your data.frame.

Continuing with Julian's f3 (a preallocated data.frame) as the fastest option so far, defined as:

# pre-allocate space
f3 <- function(n){
  df <- data.frame(x = numeric(n), y = character(n), stringsAsFactors = FALSE)
  for(i in 1:n){
    df$x[i] <- i
    df$y[i] <- toString(i)
  }
  df
}

Here's a similar approach, but one where the data.frame is created as the last step.

# Use preallocated vectors
f4 <- function(n) {
  x <- numeric(n)
  y <- character(n)
  for (i in 1:n) {
    x[i] <- i
    y[i] <- i
  }
  data.frame(x, y, stringsAsFactors=FALSE)
}

microbenchmark from the "microbenchmark" package will give us more comprehensive insight than system.time:

library(microbenchmark)
microbenchmark(f1(1000), f3(1000), f4(1000), times = 5)
# Unit: milliseconds
#      expr         min          lq      median         uq         max neval
#  f1(1000) 1024.539618 1029.693877 1045.972666 1055.25931 1112.769176     5
#  f3(1000)  149.417636  150.529011  150.827393  151.02230  160.637845     5
#  f4(1000)    7.872647    7.892395    7.901151    7.95077    8.049581     5

f1() (the approach below) is incredibly inefficient because of how often it calls data.frame and because growing objects that way is generally slow in R. f3() is much improved due to preallocation, but the data.frame structure itself might be part of the bottleneck here. f4() tries to bypass that bottleneck without compromising the approach you want to take.


Original answer

This is really not a good idea, but if you wanted to do it this way, I guess you can try:

for (i in 1:10) {
  df <- rbind(df, data.frame(x = i, y = toString(i)))
}

Note that in your code, there is one other problem:

  • You should use stringsAsFactors if you want the characters to not get converted to factors. Use: df = data.frame(x = numeric(), y = character(), stringsAsFactors = FALSE)
  • 6
    Thanks! That solves my problem. Why is this "really not a good idea"? And in what way are x and y mixed in the for loop? – Gyan Veda Dec 19 '13 at 19:13
  • 5
    @user2932774, It's incredibly inefficient to grow an object this way in R. An improvement (but still not necessarily the best way) would be to preallocate a data.frame of the ultimate size you expect and add the values in with [ extraction/replacement. – A5C1D2H2I1M1N2O1R2T1 Dec 19 '13 at 19:16
  • 1
    Thanks, Ananda. I normally go with preallocation, but I disagree that this is really not a good idea. It depends on the situation. In my case, I'm dealing with small data and the alternative will be more time-consuming to code. Plus, this is more elegant code compared to that required to update numerical indices to fill the appropriate portions of the pre-allocated data frame on every iteration. Just curious, what is the "best way" to accomplish this task in your opinion? I would have thought that preallocation would have been best. – Gyan Veda Dec 19 '13 at 19:26
  • 2
    @user2932774, it's cool. I appreciate your perspective too--I pretty much never really work with big datasets either. That said, if I'm going to work on writing a function or something, I would usually spend a little bit extra effort trying to tweak the code to get better speeds whenever possible. See my update for an example of a pretty huge speed difference. – A5C1D2H2I1M1N2O1R2T1 Dec 19 '13 at 19:58
  • 1
    Whoa, that's a huge difference! Thanks for running that simulation and teaching me about the microbenchmark package. I definitely agree with you that it's nice to put in that extra effort. In my particular case, I guess I just wanted something quicka and dirty on some code that I might never have to run again. :) – Gyan Veda Dec 19 '13 at 20:08
28

Let's benchmark the three solutions proposed:

# use rbind
f1 <- function(n){
  df <- data.frame(x = numeric(), y = character())
  for(i in 1:n){
    df <- rbind(df, data.frame(x = i, y = toString(i)))
  }
  df
}
# use list
f2 <- function(n){
  df <- data.frame(x = numeric(), y = character(), stringsAsFactors = FALSE)
  for(i in 1:n){
    df[i,] <- list(i, toString(i))
  }
  df
}
# pre-allocate space
f3 <- function(n){
  df <- data.frame(x = numeric(1000), y = character(1000), stringsAsFactors = FALSE)
  for(i in 1:n){
    df$x[i] <- i
    df$y[i] <- toString(i)
  }
  df
}
system.time(f1(1000))
#   user  system elapsed 
#   1.33    0.00    1.32 
system.time(f2(1000))
#   user  system elapsed 
#   0.19    0.00    0.19 
system.time(f3(1000))
#   user  system elapsed 
#   0.14    0.00    0.14

The best solution is to pre-allocate space (as intended in R). The next-best solution is to use list, and the worst solution (at least based on these timing results) appears to be rbind.

  • Thanks! Though I disagree with Ananda's suggestion. Whether I want the characters to be converted to levels of a factor or not will depend on what I want to do with the output. Though I guess that with the solution you propose, it is necessary to set stringsAsFactors to FALSE. – Gyan Veda Dec 19 '13 at 19:22
  • @user2932774 check the updated answer – Julián Urbano Dec 19 '13 at 19:31
  • Thanks for the simulation. I realize that preallocation is best in terms of processing speed, but that is not the only factor that I considered in making this coding decision. – Gyan Veda Dec 19 '13 at 19:36
  • 1
    In f1 you confused by assigning string to numeric vector x. Correct line is: df <- rbind(df, data.frame(x = i, y = toString(i))) – Eldar Agalarov Jun 1 '14 at 22:19
12

Suppose you simply don't know the size of the data.frame in advance. It can well be a few rows, or a few millions. You need to have some sort of container, that grows dynamically. Taking in consideration my experience and all related answers in SO I come with 4 distinct solutions:

  1. rbindlist to the data.frame

  2. Use data.table's fast set operation and couple it with manually doubling the table when needed.

  3. Use RSQLite and append to the table held in memory.

  4. data.frame's own ability to grow and use custom environment (which has reference semantics) to store the data.frame so it will not be copied on return.

Here is a test of all the methods for both small and large number of appended rows. Each method has 3 functions associated with it:

  • create(first_element) that returns the appropriate backing object with first_element put in.

  • append(object, element) that appends the element to the end of the table (represented by object).

  • access(object) gets the data.frame with all the inserted elements.

rbindlist to the data.frame

That is quite easy and straight-forward:

create.1<-function(elems)
{
  return(as.data.table(elems))
}

append.1<-function(dt, elems)
{ 
  return(rbindlist(list(dt,  elems),use.names = TRUE))
}

access.1<-function(dt)
{
  return(dt)
}

data.table::set + manually doubling the table when needed.

I will store the true length of the table in a rowcount attribute.

create.2<-function(elems)
{
  return(as.data.table(elems))
}

append.2<-function(dt, elems)
{
  n<-attr(dt, 'rowcount')
  if (is.null(n))
    n<-nrow(dt)
  if (n==nrow(dt))
  {
    tmp<-elems[1]
    tmp[[1]]<-rep(NA,n)
    dt<-rbindlist(list(dt, tmp), fill=TRUE, use.names=TRUE)
    setattr(dt,'rowcount', n)
  }
  pos<-as.integer(match(names(elems), colnames(dt)))
  for (j in seq_along(pos))
  {
    set(dt, i=as.integer(n+1), pos[[j]], elems[[j]])
  }
  setattr(dt,'rowcount',n+1)
  return(dt)
}

access.2<-function(elems)
{
  n<-attr(elems, 'rowcount')
  return(as.data.table(elems[1:n,]))
}

SQL should be optimized for fast record insertion, so I initially had high hopes for RSQLite solution

This is basically copy&paste of Karsten W. answer on similar thread.

create.3<-function(elems)
{
  con <- RSQLite::dbConnect(RSQLite::SQLite(), ":memory:")
  RSQLite::dbWriteTable(con, 't', as.data.frame(elems))
  return(con)
}

append.3<-function(con, elems)
{ 
  RSQLite::dbWriteTable(con, 't', as.data.frame(elems), append=TRUE)
  return(con)
}

access.3<-function(con)
{
  return(RSQLite::dbReadTable(con, "t", row.names=NULL))
}

data.frame's own row-appending + custom environment.

create.4<-function(elems)
{
  env<-new.env()
  env$dt<-as.data.frame(elems)
  return(env)
}

append.4<-function(env, elems)
{ 
  env$dt[nrow(env$dt)+1,]<-elems
  return(env)
}

access.4<-function(env)
{
  return(env$dt)
}

The test suite:

For convenience I will use one test function to cover them all with indirect calling. (I checked: using do.call instead of calling the functions directly doesn't makes the code run measurable longer).

test<-function(id, n=1000)
{
  n<-n-1
  el<-list(a=1,b=2,c=3,d=4)
  o<-do.call(paste0('create.',id),list(el))
  s<-paste0('append.',id)
  for (i in 1:n)
  {
    o<-do.call(s,list(o,el))
  }
  return(do.call(paste0('access.', id), list(o)))
}

Let's see the performance for n=10 insertions.

I also added a 'placebo' functions (with suffix 0) that don't perform anything - just to measure the overhead of the test setup.

r<-microbenchmark(test(0,n=10), test(1,n=10),test(2,n=10),test(3,n=10), test(4,n=10))
autoplot(r)

Timings for adding n=10 rows

Timings for n=100 rows Timings for n=1000 rows

For 1E5 rows (measurements done on Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-4710HQ CPU @ 2.50GHz):

nr  function      time
4   data.frame    228.251 
3   sqlite        133.716
2   data.table      3.059
1   rbindlist     169.998 
0   placebo         0.202

It looks like the SQLite-based sulution, although regains some speed on large data, is nowhere near data.table + manual exponential growth. The difference is almost two orders of magnitude!

Summary

If you know that you will append rather small number of rows (n<=100), go ahead and use the simplest possible solution: just assign the rows to the data.frame using bracket notation and ignore the fact that the data.frame is not pre-populated.

For everything else use data.table::set and grow the data.table exponentially (e.g. using my code).

  • 1
    The reason SQLite is slow is that on each INSERT INTO, it has to REINDEX, which is O(n), where n is the number of rows. This means that insert into a SQL database one row at a time is O(n^2). SQLite can be very fast, if you insert a whole data.frame at once, but it's not the best at growing line by line. – Julian Zucker Jun 29 '17 at 14:52
2

Lets take a vector 'point' which has numbers from 1 to 5

point = c(1,2,3,4,5)

if we want to append a number 6 anywhere inside the vector then below command may come handy

i) Vectors

new_var = append(point, 6 ,after = length(point))

ii) columns of a table

new_var = append(point, 6 ,after = length(mtcars$mpg))

The command append takes three arguments:

  1. the vector/column to be modified.
  2. value to be included in the modified vector.
  3. a subscript, after which the values are to be appended.

simple...!! Apologies in case of any...!

1

A more generic solution for might be the following.

    extendDf <- function (df, n) {
    withFactors <- sum(sapply (df, function(X) (is.factor(X)) )) > 0
    nr          <- nrow (df)
    colNames    <- names(df)
    for (c in 1:length(colNames)) {
        if (is.factor(df[,c])) {
            col         <- vector (mode='character', length = nr+n) 
            col[1:nr]   <- as.character(df[,c])
            col[(nr+1):(n+nr)]<- rep(col[1], n)  # to avoid extra levels
            col         <- as.factor(col)
        } else {
            col         <- vector (mode=mode(df[1,c]), length = nr+n)
            class(col)  <- class (df[1,c])
            col[1:nr]   <- df[,c] 
        }
        if (c==1) {
            newDf       <- data.frame (col ,stringsAsFactors=withFactors)
        } else {
            newDf[,c]   <- col 
        }
    }
    names(newDf) <- colNames
    newDf
}

The function extendDf() extends a data frame with n rows.

As an example:

aDf <- data.frame (l=TRUE, i=1L, n=1, c='a', t=Sys.time(), stringsAsFactors = TRUE)
extendDf (aDf, 2)
#      l i n c                   t
# 1  TRUE 1 1 a 2016-07-06 17:12:30
# 2 FALSE 0 0 a 1970-01-01 01:00:00
# 3 FALSE 0 0 a 1970-01-01 01:00:00

system.time (eDf <- extendDf (aDf, 100000))
#    user  system elapsed 
#   0.009   0.002   0.010
system.time (eDf <- extendDf (eDf, 100000))
#    user  system elapsed 
#   0.068   0.002   0.070

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