7

What is difference between class and Class.new & module and Module.new?

I know that:

  1. Class.new/Module.new create an anonymous class/module. When we assign it to constant for the first time it becomes name of that class/module. class/module do this automatically.

  2. When we want to inherit, we can pass an argument: Class.new(ancestor). When we don't specify an ancestor, it is set to the Object. class use this syntax: class A < Ancestor

  3. Class.new returns an object. class A returns nil. Same goes for modules.

Did I miss something?

2 Answers 2

12

The interesting point that you missed between class keyword and Class::new is - Class::new accepts block. So when you will be creating a class object using Class::new you can also access to the surrounding variables. Because block is closure. But this is not possible, when you will be creating a class using the keyword class. Because class creates a brand new scope which has no knowledge about the outside world. Let me give you some examples.

Here I am creating a class using keyword class :

count = 2

class Foo
    puts count
end
# undefined local variable or method `count' for Foo:Class (NameError)

Here one using Class.new :

count = 2
Foo = Class.new do |c|
    puts count
end
# >> 2

The same difference goes with keyword module and Module::new.

1
  • Refer this for some more informations........... May 24, 2015 at 4:42
4

Class.new returns an object. class A returns nil. Same goes for modules.

That's wrong. A class/module definition returns the value of the last expression evaluated inside of the class/module body:

class Foo
  42
end
# => 42

Typically, the last expression evaluated inside of a class/module body will be a method definition expression, which in current versions of Ruby returns a Symbol denoting the name of the method:

class Foo
  def bar; end
end
# => :bar

In older versions of Ruby, the return value of a method definition expression was implementation-defined. Rubinius returned a CompiledMethod object for the method in question, whereas YARV and most others simply returned nil.

2
  • which in current versions of Ruby returns a Symbol denoting the name of the method -- I was not aware of. Thanks for the information. In which version this feature you found. I am now on 1.9.3 Dec 20, 2013 at 15:43
  • @ArupRakshit: 2.0 or 2.1, not sure. I have been on 2.1 for quite a while now, so I can't remember for sure. It's documented in the release notes, though. Dec 20, 2013 at 15:47

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.