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I have a shared library that I wish to link an executable against using GCC. The shared library has a nonstandard name not of the form libNAME.so, so I can not use the usual -l option. (It happens to also be a Python extension, and so has no 'lib' prefix.)

I am able to pass the path to the library file directly to the link command line, but this causes the library path to be hardcoded into the executable.

For example:

g++ -o build/bin/myapp build/bin/_mylib.so

Is there a way to link to this library without causing the path to be hardcoded into the executable?

3 Answers 3

76

There is the ":" prefix that allows you to give different names to your libraries. If you use

g++ -o build/bin/myapp -l:_mylib.so other_source_files

should search your path for the _mylib.so.

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  • 3
    I am finding that this results in build/bin/_mylib.so embedded in the library that was linked using -l: - instead of embedding just _mylib.so as it normally does for standard sonames. As a result, when you try loading _mylib.so, it would be looking for that full path (ldd would show it) and won't find _mylib.so by itself.
    – Evgen
    Jun 15, 2016 at 23:25
  • this information is found in man ld: "On systems which support shared libraries, ld may also search for files other than libnamespec.a. Specifically, on ELF and SunOS systems, ld will search a directory for a library called libnamespec.so before searching for one called libnamespec.a. (By convention, a ".so" extension indicates a shared library.) Note that this behavior does not apply to :filename, which always specifies a file called filename."
    – btwiuse
    Aug 14, 2017 at 11:36
  • Like @EvgeniiPuchkaryov I'm using -L/path/to/lib & -l:mylib.so and still getting the full path hard coded to elf header. any ideas on how to solve this??
    – AmitE
    Jan 8, 2018 at 19:52
  • I ended up building a library with standard name, like libmylib.so and then renaming it to _mylib.so before placing it to the final destination
    – Evgen
    Jan 17, 2018 at 16:33
  • Thanks. And if I use CMAKE instead of explicit calls of g++, does CMAKE support -l: somehow?
    – Fedor
    Nov 24, 2021 at 14:52
2

If you can copy the shared library to the working directory when g++ is invoked then this should work:

g++ -o build/bin/myapp _mylib.so other_source_files
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If you are on Unix or Linux I think you can create a symbolic link to the library in the directory you want the library.

For example:
ln -s build/bin/_mylib.so build/bin/lib_mylib.so

You could then use -l_mylib

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symbolic_link

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