1

I've wrote this two versions of code for computing a dotproduct operation on two arrays. each length is 256. here is very simple sequential code:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main(int argc, char* argv[]){
    double sum;
    double a[256], b[256];
    int n = 256, i;
    for (i=0; i<n; i++){
        a[i] = i * 0.5;
        b[i] = i * 2.0; 
    }
    sum = 0;
    for (i=1; i<=n; i++){
        sum = sum + a[i]*b[i];
    }
    printf ("sum = %f\n", sum);
}//main

answer is 5559680

but the parallel code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <pthread.h>

#define NUMTHRDS 4

double sum;
double a[256], b[256];
int status;
int n=256;
pthread_t thds[NUMTHRDS];
pthread_mutex_t mutexsum;

void* dotprod(void *arg){
    int myid, i, my_first, my_last;
    double sum_local;

    myid = (int)arg;
    my_first = myid * n/NUMTHRDS;
    my_last = (myid + 1) * n/NUMTHRDS;

    sum_local = 0;
    for (i=my_first; i<=my_last; i++){
        sum_local = sum_local + a[i]*b[i];
    }

    pthread_mutex_lock(&mutexsum);
    sum = sum + sum_local;
    pthread_mutex_unlock(&mutexsum);

    pthread_exit((void*)0);
}//dotprod

int main(int argc, char* argv[]){
    int i;
    pthread_attr_t attr;
    for (i=0; i<n; i++){
        a[i] = i * 0.5;
        b[i] = i * 2.0;
    }

    pthread_mutex_init(&mutexsum, NULL);
    pthread_attr_init(&attr);
    pthread_attr_setdetachstate(&attr, PTHREAD_CREATE_JOINABLE);

    for (i=0; i<NUMTHRDS; i++){
        pthread_create(&thds[i], &attr, dotprod, (void*)i);
    }

    pthread_attr_destroy(&attr);

    for(i=0; i<NUMTHRDS; i++){
        pthread_join(thds[i], (void **)&status);
    }

    printf("sum = %f \n", sum);
    pthread_mutex_destroy(&mutexsum);
    pthread_exit(NULL);

    return 0;   
}//main

answer is 5617024

i totally confused what is this difference for?

  • 3
    for (i=1; i<=n; i++) doesn't seem right... – Oliver Charlesworth Dec 20 '13 at 16:45
  • @OliCharlesworth - no it doesn't matter, because a[0] and b[0] are both equal to zero. – muradin Dec 20 '13 at 17:02
  • It does matter, because you're exceeding the array bounds. – Oliver Charlesworth Dec 20 '13 at 17:08
  • 2
    @alk: Because Valgrind can only check dynamically-allocated memory. – Oliver Charlesworth Dec 20 '13 at 17:18
  • 1
    @OliCharlesworth: Uhm yes, forgot about this. So valgrind --tool=exp-sgcheck might do the job. At least for this example. – alk Dec 20 '13 at 17:43
3

off by one error.

for (i=1; i<=n; i++){

for (i=0; i<n; i++) {

and

for (i=my_first; i<=my_last; i++){

for (i=my_first; i<my_last; i++){

In the first program, you are adding in a[256] and b[256], which is off the end of the array. most likely those values were 0, so you got the right answer.

In the second program, you are counting some parts of the array twice: 64, 128, 192, and still adding in index 256.

Always check the boundary conditions of your loops, especially with array accesses.

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