107

I wrote such class:

class Test
{
    [Key]
    [DatabaseGeneratedAttribute(DatabaseGeneratedOption.Identity)]
    public int Id { get; set; }
    [Required]
    public List<String> Strings { get; set; }

    public Test()
    {
        Strings = new List<string>
        {
            "test",
            "test2",
            "test3",
            "test4"
        };
    }
}

and

internal class DataContext : DbContext
{
    public DbSet<Test> Tests { get; set; }
}

After run code:

var db = new DataContext();
db.Tests.Add(new Test());
db.SaveChanges();

my data is getting saved but just the Id. I don't have any tables nor relationships applying to Strings list.

What am I doing wrong? I tried also to make Strings virtual but it didn't change anything.

Thank you for your help.

  • 3
    How do you expect the List<sting> is stored into the db? That won't work. Change it to string. – Wiktor Zychla Dec 20 '13 at 21:12
  • 4
    If you have a list, it has to point to some entity. For EF to store the list, it needs a second table. In the second table it will put everything from your list, and use a foreign key to point back to your Test entity. So make a new entity with Id property and MyString property, then make a list of that. – Daniel Gabriel Dec 20 '13 at 21:13
  • 1
    Right...It can't be stored in the db directly but I hoped Entity Framework create new entity to do that by itself. Thank you for your comments. – Paul Dec 20 '13 at 21:59

10 Answers 10

163

Entity Framework does not support collections of primitive types. You can either create an entity (which will be saved to a different table) or do some string processing to save your list as a string and populate the list after the entity is materialized.

| improve this answer | |
  • what if an entity contains a List of entities? how will the mapping be saved? – A_Arnold Aug 6 '18 at 15:16
  • Depends - most likely to a separate table. – Pawel Aug 6 '18 at 19:16
  • can try to serialize and then compress and save the json formatted text, or encrypt and save it if its needed. either way you cant have the framework do the complex type table mapping for you. – Niklas Aug 13 '19 at 14:50
107

EF Core 2.1+ :

Property:

public string[] Strings { get; set; }

OnModelCreating:

modelBuilder.Entity<YourEntity>()
            .Property(e => e.Strings)
            .HasConversion(
                v => string.Join(',', v),
                v => v.Split(',', StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries));
| improve this answer | |
  • 5
    Great solution for EF Core. Although it seems to have an issue whit char to string conversion. I had to implement it like such: .HasConversion( v => string.Join(";", v), v => v.Split(new char[] { ';' }, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries)); – Peter Koller Dec 17 '18 at 7:15
  • 9
    This is the only really correct answer IMHO. All the others require you to change your model, and that violates the principle that domain models should be persistence ignorant. (It is fine if you are using separate persistence and domain models, but few people actually do that.) – Marcell Toth Jan 30 '19 at 10:07
  • 2
    You should accepted my edit request because you cannot use char as the first argument of string.Join and you have to provide a char[] as the first argument of string.Split if you also want to provide StringSplitOptions. – Dominik Apr 8 '19 at 14:17
  • 2
    In .NET Core you can. I'm using this exact piece of code in one of my projects. – Sasan Apr 8 '19 at 14:26
  • 2
    Not available in .NET Standard – Sasan Apr 8 '19 at 19:27
64

This answer is based on the ones provided by @Sasan and @CAD bloke.

If you wish to use this in .NET Standard 2 or don't want Newtonsoft, see Xaniff's answer below

Works only with EF Core 2.1+ (not .NET Standard compatible)(Newtonsoft JsonConvert)

builder.Entity<YourEntity>().Property(p => p.Strings)
    .HasConversion(
        v => JsonConvert.SerializeObject(v),
        v => JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<List<string>>(v));

Using the EF Core fluent configuration we serialize/deserialize the List to/from JSON.

Why this code is the perfect mix of everything you could strive for:

  • The problem with Sasn's original answer is that it will turn into a big mess if the strings in the list contains commas (or any character chosen as the delimiter) because it will turn a single entry into multiple entries but it is the easiest to read and most concise.
  • The problem with CAD bloke's answer is that it is ugly and requires the model to be altered which is a bad design practice (see Marcell Toth's comment on Sasan's answer). But it is the only answer that is data-safe.
| improve this answer | |
  • 9
    bravo, this should probably be the accepted answer – Shirkan Jul 23 '19 at 11:18
  • 1
    I wish this worked in .NET Framework & EF 6, it’s a really elegant solution. – CAD bloke Jul 23 '19 at 19:00
  • This is an amazing solution. Thank you – Marlon Apr 29 at 5:30
  • Are you capable of querying on that field? My attempts have failed miserably: var result = await context.MyTable.Where(x => x.Strings.Contains("findme")).ToListAsync(); does not find anything. – Nicola Iarocci May 8 at 7:01
  • 3
    To answer my own question, quoting the docs: "Use of value conversions may impact the ability of EF Core to translate expressions to SQL. A warning will be logged for such cases. Removal of these limitations is being considered for a future release." - Would still be nice though. – Nicola Iarocci May 8 at 8:34
42

I Know this is a old question, and Pawel has given the correct answer, I just wanted to show a code example of how to do some string processing, and avoid an extra class for the list of a primitive type.

public class Test
{
    public Test()
    {
        _strings = new List<string>
        {
            "test",
            "test2",
            "test3",
            "test4"
        };
    }

    [Key]
    [DatabaseGenerated(DatabaseGeneratedOption.Identity)]
    public int Id { get; set; }

    private List<String> _strings { get; set; }

    public List<string> Strings
    {
        get { return _strings; }
        set { _strings = value; }
    }

    [Required]
    public string StringsAsString
    {
        get { return String.Join(',', _strings); }
        set { _strings = value.Split(',').ToList(); }
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Why not static methods instead of using public properties? (Or am I showing my procedural programming bias?) – Duston Sep 18 '15 at 17:17
  • @randoms why is it necessary to define 2 lists? one as a property and one as the actual list? I would appreciate if you can also explain how the binding here works, because this solution is not working well for me, and I can't figure out the binding here. Thanks – LiranBo Nov 18 '15 at 11:25
  • 2
    there is one private list, which has two public properties associated, Strings, which you will use in your application to add and remove strings, and StringsAsString which is the value that will be saved to the db, as a comma separated list. I'm not really sure what you are asking though, the binding is the private list _strings, which connects the two public properties together. – randoms Nov 18 '15 at 11:40
  • 1
    Please keep in mind that this answer does not escape , (comma) in strings. If a string in the list contains one or more , (comma) the string is splitted to multiple strings. – Jogge Apr 5 '17 at 6:32
  • 2
    In string.Join the comma should be surrounded by double quotes (for a string), not single quotes (for a char). See msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/57a79xd0(v=vs.110).aspx – Michael Brandon Morris May 10 '17 at 16:23
29

JSON.NET to the rescue.

You serialize it to JSON to persist in the Database and Deserialize it to reconstitute the .NET collection. This seems to perform better than I expected it to with Entity Framework 6 & SQLite. I know you asked for List<string> but here's an example of an even more complex collection that works just fine.

I tagged the persisted property with [Obsolete] so it would be very obvious to me that "this is not the property you are looking for" in the normal course of coding. The "real" property is tagged with [NotMapped] so Entity framework ignores it.

(unrelated tangent): You could do the same with more complex types but you need to ask yourself did you just make querying that object's properties too hard for yourself? (yes, in my case).

using Newtonsoft.Json;
....
[NotMapped]
public Dictionary<string, string> MetaData { get; set; } = new Dictionary<string, string>();

/// <summary> <see cref="MetaData"/> for database persistence. </summary>
[Obsolete("Only for Persistence by EntityFramework")]
public string MetaDataJsonForDb
{
    get
    {
        return MetaData == null || !MetaData.Any()
                   ? null
                   : JsonConvert.SerializeObject(MetaData);
    }

    set
    {
        if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(value))
           MetaData.Clear();
        else
           MetaData = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<Dictionary<string, string>>(value);
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • I find this solution quite ugly, but it's actually the only sane one. All options offering to join the list using whatever character and then split it back might turn into a wild mess if the splitting character is included in the strings. Json should be much more sane. – Mathieu VIALES Jun 23 '19 at 21:13
  • 1
    I ended up making an answer that is a "merge" of this one and an other one to fix each answer problem (ugliness/data-safety) using the other one's strong points. – Mathieu VIALES Jul 23 '19 at 15:58
12

Just to simplify -

Entity framework doesn't support primitives. You either create a class to wrap it or add another property to format the list as a string:

public ICollection<string> List { get; set; }
public string ListString
{
    get { return string.Join(",", List); }
    set { List = value.Split(',').ToList(); }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    This is in case a list item cannot contain a string. Otherwise, you'll need to escape it. Or to serialize/deserialize the list for more complex situations. – Adam Tal Dec 23 '15 at 13:24
  • 3
    Also, don't forget to use [NotMapped] on the ICollection property – Ben Petersen Jan 29 '18 at 1:35
12

Slightly tweaking @Mathieu Viales's answer, here's a .NET Standard compatible snippet using the new System.Text.Json serializer thus eliminating the dependency on Newtonsoft.Json.

using System.Text.Json;

builder.Entity<YourEntity>().Property(p => p.Strings)
    .HasConversion(
        v => JsonSerializer.Serialize(v, default),
        v => JsonSerializer.Deserialize<List<string>>(v, default));

Note that while the second argument in both Serialize() and Deserialize() is typically optional, you'll get an error:

An expression tree may not contain a call or invocation that uses optional arguments

Explicitly setting that to the default (null) for each clears that up.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    I was thinking of updating my answer to add the new serialization alternative. I really like the use of default for you optional params trick. Makes for very clean code. – Mathieu VIALES Oct 7 at 12:12
6

Of course Pawel has given the right answer. But I found in this post that since EF 6+ it is possible to save private properties. So I would prefer this code, because you are not able to save the Strings in a wrong way.

public class Test
{
    [Key]
    [DatabaseGenerated(DatabaseGeneratedOption.Identity)]
    public int Id { get; set; }

    [Column]
    [Required]
    private String StringsAsStrings { get; set; }

    public List<String> Strings
    {
        get { return StringsAsStrings.Split(',').ToList(); }
        set
        {
            StringsAsStrings = String.Join(",", value);
        }
    }
    public Test()
    {
        Strings = new List<string>
        {
            "test",
            "test2",
            "test3",
            "test4"
        };
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 7
    What if string contains a comma? – Chalky May 9 '17 at 11:10
  • 4
    I wouldn't recommend doing it this way. StringsAsStrings will only be updated when the Strings reference is changed, and the only time in your example that happens is at assignment. Adding or removing items from your Strings list after assignment will not update the StringsAsStrings backing variable. The proper way to implement this would be to expose StringsAsStrings as a view of the Strings list, instead of the other way around. Join the values together in the get accessor of the StringsAsStrings property, and split them in the set accessor. – jduncanator May 26 '17 at 1:42
  • To avoid adding private properties (which isn't side effect free) make the setter of the serialized property private. jduncanator is of course right: if you don't catch the list manipulations (use a ObservableCollection?), the changes won't be noticed by EF. – Leonidas Feb 5 '18 at 5:20
  • As @jduncanator mentioned this solution does not work when a modification to the List is made (binding in MVVM for example) – Ihab Oct 7 '19 at 9:45
2

You can use this ScalarCollection container that confines an array and provides some manipulation options (Gist):

Usage:

public class Person
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    //will be stored in database as single string.
    public SaclarStringCollection Phones { get; set; } = new ScalarStringCollection();
}

Code:

using System.Collections.ObjectModel;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Linq;

namespace System.Collections.Specialized
{
#if NET462
  [ComplexType]
#endif
  public abstract class ScalarCollectionBase<T> :
#if NET462
    Collection<T>,
#else
    ObservableCollection<T>
#endif
  {
    public virtual string Separator { get; } = "\n";
    public virtual string ReplacementChar { get; } = " ";
    public ScalarCollectionBase(params T[] values)
    {
      if (values != null)
        foreach (var item in Items)
          Items.Add(item);
    }

#if NET462
    [Browsable(false)]
#endif
    [EditorBrowsable(EditorBrowsableState.Never)]
    [Obsolete("Not to be used directly by user, use Items property instead.")]
    public string Data
    {
      get
      {
        var data = Items.Select(item => Serialize(item)
          .Replace(Separator, ReplacementChar.ToString()));
        return string.Join(Separator, data.Where(s => s?.Length > 0));
      }
      set
      {
        Items.Clear();
        if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(value))
          return;

        foreach (var item in value
            .Split(new[] { Separator }, 
              StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries).Select(item => Deserialize(item)))
          Items.Add(item);
      }
    }

    public void AddRange(params T[] items)
    {
      if (items != null)
        foreach (var item in items)
          Add(item);
    }

    protected abstract string Serialize(T item);
    protected abstract T Deserialize(string item);
  }

  public class ScalarStringCollection : ScalarCollectionBase<string>
  {
    protected override string Deserialize(string item) => item;
    protected override string Serialize(string item) => item;
  }

  public class ScalarCollection<T> : ScalarCollectionBase<T>
    where T : IConvertible
  {
    protected override T Deserialize(string item) =>
      (T)Convert.ChangeType(item, typeof(T));
    protected override string Serialize(T item) => Convert.ToString(item);
  }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 10
    looks a bit over engineered?! – Falco Alexander Mar 7 '17 at 14:39
  • 1
    @FalcoAlexander I've updated my post... Maybe a bit verbose but does the job. Make sure you replace NET462 with the appropriate environment or add it to it. – Shimmy Weitzhandler Mar 8 '17 at 0:09
  • 1
    +1 for the effort of putting this together. The solution is a little bit overkill for storing an array of strings :) – GETah Jun 2 '17 at 10:11
2

I want to add that when using Npgsql (data provider for PostgreSQL), arrays and lists of primitive types are actually supported:

https://www.npgsql.org/efcore/mapping/array.html

| improve this answer | |

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