18

How do I find the missing number from a sorted list the pythonic way?

a=[1,2,3,4,5,7,8,9,10]

I have come across this post but is there a more and efficient way to do this?

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16 Answers 16

19
>>> a=[1,2,3,4,5,7,8,9,10]
>>> sum(xrange(a[0],a[-1]+1)) - sum(a)
6

alternatively (using the sum of AP series formula)

>>> a[-1]*(a[-1] + a[0]) / 2 - sum(a)
6

For generic cases when multiple numbers may be missing, you can formulate an O(n) approach.

>>> a=[1,2,3,4,7,8,10]
>>> from itertools import imap, chain
>>> from operator import sub
>>> print list(chain.from_iterable((a[i] + d for d in xrange(1, diff))
                        for i, diff in enumerate(imap(sub, a[1:], a))
                        if diff > 1))
[5, 6, 9]
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  • What if 1, 2, 3 are missing? – thefourtheye Dec 21 '13 at 11:08
  • 3
    Question says How to find missing number and not How to find amissing numbers – Abhijit Dec 21 '13 at 11:08
  • 1
    @thefourtheye: Check my update for a generic case with multiple gaps – Abhijit Dec 21 '13 at 11:23
  • If the missing number is the highest or lowest one, ie. either 1 or 10 in his list is missing, then the above algorithm doesn't work, but that's nitpicking. – Lasse V. Karlsen Dec 21 '13 at 11:33
  • @LasseV.Karlsen: Then we can argue if those numbers are actually missing, or, they are not supposed to be in the list. – Abhijit Dec 21 '13 at 11:35
11

This should work:

    a = [1,3,4,5, 7,8, 9, 10]
    b = [x for x in range(a[0], a[-1] + 1)]
    a = set(a)
    print (list(a ^ set(b)))`
    >> [2,6]
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  • 1
    Elegant solution, which doesn't involve extra modules (which is the case with the solution provided by @Abhijit). The only issue (not sure if it exists!) is the conversion to a set. If the list already contains unique numbers, I'm not sure what the performance impact would be when the set() conversion is applied. Sadly the ^ operator only works on sets hence the conversion needs to take place even when one knows that the list is actually a set (though stored as a list). – rbaleksandar Mar 10 at 10:11
8
1 + 2 + 3 + ... + (n - 1) + n = (n) * (n + 1)/2

so the missing number is:

(a[-1] * (a[-1] + 1))/2 - sum(a)
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  • Your answer is correct, but given your first sentence, it would make a lot more sense if you actually used that fact in the answer, ie remove the first part and replace it with the product... – Steve P. Dec 21 '13 at 11:58
  • Modified it to be relevant to the problem at hand. – Steve P. Dec 21 '13 at 12:08
7
set(range(a[len(a)-1])[1:]) - set(a)

Take the set of all numbers minus the set of given.

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  • range(a[0],a[-1]+1) ? – kelvinss Dec 21 '13 at 11:14
  • @kelvinss I was thinking that his array is beginning from 1 always because he asked what if 1,2,3 are missing – Saša Šijak Dec 21 '13 at 11:18
  • I realized that the +1 in the second argument doesn't matter. But I think range(1,a[-1]) is more clear. – kelvinss Dec 21 '13 at 11:24
  • 1
    I believe this is the most concise solution that solves the general case. The other algorithms mentioned don't account for gaps. E.g. a=[1, 2, 4, 99]. Your method handles this appropriately. – James Feb 11 '14 at 15:27
7

And another itertools way:

from itertools import count, izip

a=[1,2,3,4,5,7,8,9,10]
nums = (b for a, b in izip(a, count(a[0])) if a != b)
next(nums, None)
# 6
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2

This will handle the cases when the first or last number is missing.

>>> a=[1,2,3,4,5,7,8,9,10]
>>> n = len(a) + 1
>>> (n*(n+1)/2) - sum(a)
6
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1

If many missing numbers in list:

>>> a=[1,2,3,4,5,7,8,10]
>>> [(e1+1) for e1,e2 in zip(a, a[1:]) if e2-e1 != 1]
[6, 9]
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  • 1
    You might want to say e2-e1 != 1 – thefourtheye Dec 21 '13 at 11:16
  • What if a=[1,2,3,4,5,8,10] – Abhijit Dec 21 '13 at 11:24
1
def find(arr):
        for x in range(0,len(arr) -1):
                if arr[x+1] - arr[x] != 1:
                        print arr[x] + 1
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1

Here is the simple logic for finding mising numbers in list.

l=[-10,-5,2,4,5,9,20]
s=l[0]
e=l[-1]
x=sorted(range(s,e+1))
l_1=[]
for i in x:
    if i not in l:
        l_1.append(i)
print(l_1)
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  • all missing numbers will be added to the ( l_1 ) list. – BrahmaReddy Seelam Dec 9 '18 at 17:39
0

A simple list comprehension approach that will work with multiple (non-consecutive) missing numbers.

def find_missing(lst):
    """Create list of integers missing from lst."""
    return [lst[x] + 1 for x in range(len(lst) - 1) 
            if lst[x] + 1 != lst[x + 1]]
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0

I used index position. this way i compare index and value.

a=[0,1,2,3,4,5,7,8,9,10]

for i in a:
  print i==a.index(i)
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  • Doesn't give the expected result. – kuro Jun 20 '17 at 17:22
0

There is a perfectly working solution by @Abhiji. I would like to extent his answer by the option to define a granularity value. This might be necessary if the list should be checked for a missing value > 1:

from itertools import imap, chain
from operator import sub

granularity = 3600
data = [3600, 10800, 14400]

print list(
  chain.from_iterable(
    (data[i] + d for d in xrange(1, diff) if d % granularity == 0) 
      for i, diff in enumerate(imap(sub, data[1:], data)) 
        if diff > granularity
  )
)

The code above would produce the following output: [7200].

As this code snipped uses a lot of nested functions, I'd further like to provide a quick back reference, that helped me to understand the code:

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0

Simple solution for the above problem, it also finds multiple missing elements.

a = [1,2,3,4,5,8,9,10]
missing_element = []
for i in range(a[0], a[-1]+1):
    if i not in a:
        missing_element.append(i)

print missing_element

o/p: [6,7]

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0

Less efficient for very large lists, but here's my version for the Sum formula:

def missing_number_sum(arr):
    return int((arr[-1]+1) * arr[-1]/2) - sum(arr)
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0

def findAllMissingNumbers(a): b = sorted(a) return list(set(range(b[0], b[-1])) - set(b))

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-1
set(range(1,a[-1])) | set(a)

Compute the union of two sets.

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