5

I'm reading http://thestarman.pcministry.com/asm/2bytejumps.htm but the text isn't very clear about how to do a JMP to an offset (a short jump to a relative address without using a label).

Let's say I have

NOP
NOP
NOP
NOP

(which is 4 bytes of instructions), and I want to skip them (skip 4 bytes). What would I write?

jmp $+4;?

jmp $+2+4;?

2 Answers 2

8

A short jmp opcode uses two bytes. When you assemble that, the current position ( $ ) points to the beginning of the JMP instruction, not to the beginning of the following instruction.

To jump to the next instruction (a jump that does not actually jump), you do

jmp $+2

So, to jump over N bytes past the JMP instruction, you will do:

jmp $+2+N

In your example, 4 NOP's

jmp $+6

The assembler should detect that this is a jump to a near address and assemble it as a short jump. If want to be sure, use

jmp short $+6
3
  • This is just what I was looking for! :) One more thing: Can I use the conditional-jump instructions set with offsets? For example, je $+N;? Dec 22, 2013 at 16:12
  • I don't see why you couldn't do it as well. Conditional short branches use two bytes, so the procedure is the same as for unconditional short jumps. Dec 22, 2013 at 16:13
  • Thank you, sir! Your answers to my last few questions are just perfect. Gracias Dec 22, 2013 at 16:14
1

"Skipping" 4 bytes with a single jmp is awkward, because relative jmps occupy 2 or 5 bytes.

To skip over (a total) of 4 bytes, you could do:

  jmp   short $+4   ; the "short" forces a 2 byte relative branch
  nop
  nop

If your problem is to fill out a modest number N of bytes, you should emit an appropriately sized-nop. Here's what I use in a compiler I wrote:

void ObjectCodeEmitNByteNop(natural n)
{ // See http://mail.openjdk.java.net/pipermail/hotspot-compiler-dev/2010-September/003881.html GOOD INFO
  /* The Intel Architecture Software developer's guide, volume 2B (instructions N-Z) contains the following table (pg 4-12) about NOP:

Table 4-9. Recommended Multi-Byte Sequence of NOP Instruction

Length    Assembly                                   Byte Sequence
=================================================================================
2 bytes   66 NOP                                     66 90H
3 bytes   NOP DWORD ptr [EAX]                        0F 1F 00H
4 bytes   NOP DWORD ptr [EAX + 00H]                  0F 1F 40 00H
5 bytes   NOP DWORD ptr [EAX + EAX*1 + 00H]          0F 1F 44 00 00H
6 bytes   66 NOP DWORD ptr [EAX + EAX*1 + 00H]       66 0F 1F 44 00 00H
7 bytes   NOP DWORD ptr [EAX + 00000000H]            0F 1F 80 00 00 00 00H
8 bytes   NOP DWORD ptr [EAX + EAX*1 + 00000000H]    0F 1F 84 00 00 00 00 00H
9 bytes   66 NOP DWORD ptr [EAX + EAX*1 + 00000000H] 66 0F 1F 84 00 00 00 00 00H
  */
  switch(n)
  { 
case 0:
  break;  // accidentally aligned
case 1:
  ObjectCodeEmitByte(0x90); // sequence recommended by AMD optimization manual
  break;
case 2:
  ObjectCodeEmitWord(0x9066); // sequence recommended by AMD and Intel optimization manual
      // MS assembler suggests:  ObjectCodeEmitWord(0xFF8B); "MOV EDI,EDI"
  break;
case 3: 
      ObjectCodeEmitThreeByteNOP();
      break;
case 4:        
  ObjectCodeEmitFourByteNOP();
      // ObjectCodeEmitDword(0x90666666); // sequence recommended by AMD optimization manual
      // MS assembler suggests: ObjectCodeEmitDword(0x0024648D); // LEA ESP,0[ESP]
  break;
    case 5:
#if 0
  ObjectCodeEmitByte(0x05); // ADD EAX, imm32
  ObjectCodeEmitDword(0);
#else
  ObjectCodeEmitByte(0x0F); // NOP ...
      ObjectCodeEmitDword(0x0000441F); // ... DWORD ptr [EAX + EAX*1 + 00H]
#endif
      break;
   case 6:
  ObjectCodeEmitWord(0x9B8D); // LEA EBX,disp32[EBX]  (Microsoft assembler emits this)
  ObjectCodeEmitDword(0x00000000); // offset = 0 --> don't change EBX
      break;
case 7:
  ObjectCodeEmitByte(0x8D); // LEA opcode byte
  ObjectCodeEmitWord(0x24A4); // ESP,disp32[ESP]
  ObjectCodeEmitDword(0x00000000); // offset = 0 --> don't change ESP
      break;
case 8:
  ObjectCodeEmitDword(0x00841F0F); // NOP DWORD ptr [EAX + EAX*1 + ...
      ObjectCodeEmitDword(0x00000000); // ...00000000H]
      break;
    case 9:
      ObjectCodeEmitByte(0x66); // 66 0F 1F 84 00 00 00 00 00H
      ObjectCodeEmitDword(0x00841F0F); // NOP DWORD ptr [EAX + EAX*1 + ...
      ObjectCodeEmitDword(0x00000000); // ...00000000H]
      break;
default:
      { ObjectCodeEmitJmpRelativeShort(ObjectCodeSize+n);
        // ObjectCodeEmitJmpRelativeLong(DesiredObjectLocation); // 5 bytes is safe; 1-4 bytes handled above
        ObjectCodeEmitNBreakpoints(n-2);
  }
  }
}

I prefer to use breakpoint instructions for inline padding that I do not intend to be executed, on the grounds that if it gets executed, the processor will trap and I'll find out about it. You can see that in the "default" case.

3
  • Actually the 4 bytes NOPs was just an example. What I want to do is "skip" N bytes of instructions. Dec 22, 2013 at 15:32
  • I don't understand what do you mean when you say rel jumps are only 2 or 5 bytes. Can't a jump "skip" whatever amount of bytes I want, from -127 to +127? Also, can I use the conditional jumps instructions with offsets? For example, je $+N;? Dec 22, 2013 at 16:07
  • @alexandernst: and this function tells you exactly what code to emit for skipping N bytes. A nop should generally be preferred; the processor executes them very fast, and jmps should be reserved for where a nop doesn't work. Relative jmps are 2 or 5 bytes in size, so you can't use a 5 byte jmp to fill a 4 byte hole, or a 2 byte jmp to fill a 1 byte hold. Yes, you can use relative jmp to pad out up to some +120 odd bytes; as I said, check the default switch case to see what it generates.
    – Ira Baxter
    Dec 22, 2013 at 16:45

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