9

Using the dir command in Windows CMD will result in the following output:

Verzeichnis von D:\workspace\filewalker

22.12.2013  17:27    <DIR>          .
22.12.2013  17:27    <DIR>          ..
22.12.2013  17:48               392 test.js
22.12.2013  17:23                 0 testöäüÄÖÜ.txt
22.12.2013  17:27    <DIR>          testÖÄÜöüäß
2 Datei(en),            392 Bytes
3 Verzeichnis(se), 273.731.170.304 Bytes frei

Using exec or spawn will result in this:

Verzeichnis von D:\workspace\filewalker

22.12.2013  17:27    <DIR>          .
22.12.2013  17:27    <DIR>          ..
22.12.2013  17:48               392 test.js
22.12.2013  17:23                 0 test������.txt
22.12.2013  17:27    <DIR>          test�������
2 Datei(en),            392 Bytes
3 Verzeichnis(se), 273.731.170.304 Bytes frei

Here is my Node Code:

var exec = require('child_process').exec,
    child;

child = exec('dir',
  function (error, stdout, stderr) {
    console.log('stdout: ' + stdout);
    console.log('stderr: ' + stderr);
    if (error !== null) {
      console.log('exec error: ' + error);
    }
});
3
  • 4
    I managed to fix it by adding cmd /c chcp 65001>nul &&(this command sets cmd's console output to utf-8) at start of my exec command, so your would look like cmd /c chcp 65001>nul && dir, it should work.
    – BladeMight
    Jul 1, 2017 at 9:51
  • @BladeMight Thank you so much! You should make this into an answer, would've saved me some time ':D (and others too, seeing the number of upvotes on your comment)
    – yaba
    Jan 7, 2020 at 16:02
  • @yaba Okay, I did it.
    – BladeMight
    Jan 7, 2020 at 19:51

3 Answers 3

7

I managed to fix it by adding cmd /c chcp 65001>nul &&(this command sets cmd's console output to utf-8) at start of my exec command, so your would look like cmd /c chcp 65001>nul && dir, it should work.

If you write cross-platform can use process.platform, to determine when you need that, something like that:

var cmd = "";
if (process.platform === "win32") { 
  cmd += "cmd /c chcp 65001>nul && "; 
};
cmd += "dir";

child = exec(cmd, //...
  • Even though dir command is not "cross-platform".
6
  • Note that this solution hardcodes the code to only work on Windows, so at the very least let's change this solution to something that only adds the chcp call only if process.platform is win32? A solution that hardcodes "this code guaranteed can't run on unix/linux/macos" is not super great =) Oct 6, 2020 at 17:17
  • @Mike'Pomax'Kamermans According to OP, he used dir command which is obviously Windows-only, so the solution is also Windows-only.
    – BladeMight
    Oct 6, 2020 at 17:42
  • certainly, but people (like me) will find this question on google looking for a way to ensure the encoding takes on windows, without hurting unix/linux/macos, so slightly improving the answer with process.platform checking is absolutely worth during for future visitors to the site looking for answers. This is mostly a request to improve the answer so it's more universal, and benefits everyone, rather than just windows code. Oct 6, 2020 at 17:46
  • but it doesn't make sense to write something like this: var cmd = ""; if (process.platform === 'win32') { cmd += "cmd /c chcp 65001>nul && "; } cmd += "dir"; //...exec...., it looks very strange to me... using a Windows command and ensuring that you are using Windows afterwards...? Though I understand your suggestion, so I updated the answer.
    – BladeMight
    Oct 6, 2020 at 21:13
  • No it doesn't, but it does when you need Node to capture the execSync output of, say, perl oldCLIutility.pl rather than dir This will happily run on every OS, but on Windows very much needs the codepage set to utf8, or things start to go very wrong when it tries to write a non-ascii character to stdout (similar to dir reporting a filename with unicode characters in it). Oct 7, 2020 at 4:19
4

I solved it (Simplified Chinese) by below code, don't know the coding page for other languages, maybe you can find it from Microsoft website:

  const encoding          = 'cp936';
  const binaryEncoding    = 'binary';

  function iconvDecode(str = '') {
      return iconv.decode(Buffer.from(str, binaryEncoding), encoding);
  }

  const  { exec } = require('child_process');  
  exec('xxx', { encoding: 'binary' }, (err, stdout, stderr) => {
        const result = iconvDecode(stdout);
        xxx
  });
2
  • 1
    const iconv = require("iconv-lite"); Apr 7, 2021 at 17:57
  • This worked for me with cp866 encoding
    – Dmitry
    Oct 3, 2021 at 19:58
2

From http://www.nodejs.org/api/child_process.html#child_process_child_process_exec_command_options_callback

There is a second optional argument to specify several options. The default options are

{ encoding: 'utf8',
  timeout: 0,
  maxBuffer: 200*1024,
  killSignal: 'SIGTERM',
  cwd: null,
  env: null }

That is Node defaults to utf8, while Windows has different code pages for different language version.

1

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