I have some code on C++.

Bird.h

class Bird
{
    std::string s;
    static int i;
public:
    Bird();

    ~Bird();
    friend std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, Bird& b);

};

Bird.cpp

#include <iostream>
#include <sstream> 
#include "Bird.h"



Bird::Bird()
{
    ++i;
    std::stringstream ss;
    ss<<"Bird#";
    ss<<i;
    s = ss.str();
}
Bird::~Bird()
{
    i--;
}
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, Bird& b)
{
    const char* chr = (b.s).c_str();
    return os << chr << std::endl;
}

Main.cpp

#include <iostream>
#include <sstream> 
#include "Bird.h"


int Bird::i=0;

int main()
{
    Bird b();
    std::cout << b;
}

I am getting the following error:

Main.obj : error LNK2019: unresolved external symbol "class Bird __cdecl b(void)" (?b@@YA?AVBird@@XZ) referenced in function _main

But if I create Bird b; it's OK. What can I do?

  • Show us the command you are using to compile this, probably you are not sending Bird.cpp to the compiler. – Pacha Dec 23 '13 at 8:14
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You meant to write Bird b; to create a Bird object.

Bird b() is a function (called b, taking no parameters and returning a Bird), which you haven't implemented.

Bird b();

This means that b is a function that takes no parameters and returns a Bird. You then try to output the value of this function, but the function doesn't exist. Perhaps you want:

Bird b;

This says that b is a Bird that should be default constructed.

The linker error is triggered by this

Bird b();

This is a function declaration of a function called b, returning a Bird by value. You then use the function here:

std::cout << b;

and the linker cannot find its implementation. You need

Bird b;   // C++03 and C++11
Bird b{}; // C++11

Furthermore, you should consider defining Bird::i in Bird.cpp, not main.cpp.

try this:

int main()
{
    Bird b;
    std::cout << b;
}

the default constructor doesn't need '()'

  • Not only it doesn't need (), it actually doesn't use (). With (), it's a function, not an object. – Angew Dec 23 '13 at 8:17
  • that it!actually i misunderstand it before. – C0reFast Dec 23 '13 at 8:22

This is a case of C++'s "Most Vexing Parse."

The C++ compiler thinks you're declaring a function named b that returns a Bird and then trying to print a pointer to it, as opposed to default-constructing an instance of Bird. The linker then complains that there's no function named b that returns a Bird. That is what this error message tries to tell you:

error LNK2019: unresolved external symbol "class Bird __cdecl b(void)" 

The Most Vexing Parse happens due to a syntactic ambiguity in the C++ language. The ambiguity exists because the syntax for a constructor invocation looks much like the syntax for a function prototype.

The ambiguity that was resolved in a way guaranteed to generate StackOverflow questions that kept some tenuous backward compatibility with C, at the expense of the otherwise obvious meaning in a C++ program.

In this case, because your Bird is default-constructed, you can simply remove the parentheses and be done. If you needed to call a different constructor, then the advice at the Wikipedia article linked above may help.

If you can use C++11, you can use the brace-initializer syntax to make it always unambiguous:

Bird b{};             // Use this if default constructed
Bird b{ ..args.. };   // Use this if you need to invoke a particular constructor

The Most Vexing Parse is a surprisingly rich topic. Google it and read and read and read if you're truly curious.

If nothing else seems to work, check if your file path does not contain special characters. This suddenly became a problem for me after adding an extra source file.

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