22

Can you describe this for me?

var arr, total;
arr = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5];
total = arr.reduce(function(previous, current) {
return previous + current;
});
// total is 15
46

The order for reduce is from left to right, and it's from right to left for reduceRight, as the following piece of code shows:

var arr = ["1", "2", "3", "4", "5"];

total1 = arr.reduce(function(prev, cur) {
    return prev + cur;
});

total2 = arr.reduceRight(function(prev, cur) {
    return prev + cur;
});

console.log(total1); // => 12345
console.log(total2); // => 54321
  • 3
    Excellent example. – FurkanO Jun 2 '16 at 12:30
12

In some cases, the difference between reduce and reduceRight does matter:

However, because adding two integers is commutative in JavaScript, it doesn't matter in your example, just like how 1 + 2 is equal to 2 + 1 in math.

var arr = ["A", "B", "C", "D", "E"];

console.log(  arr.reduce((previous, current)      => previous + current)  )
console.log(  arr.reduceRight((previous, current) => previous + current)  )

  • 5
    Sorry but I think this is a bad example because it is not robust and it is just not a realistic example. Anyone implementing totalLeft or totalRight as methods would coerce Number type within the function, which would make your use case irrelevant. – Elise Chant Feb 22 '15 at 20:05
  • @EliseChant: well it depends on your use case. If you're doing something with side effects like getting a list of files sequentially using promises, the order would obviously matter. If the function passed has no side effects, then it would just be a matter of whether the function is associative or not. – Qantas 94 Heavy Feb 23 '15 at 9:49
  • @EliseChant you are ranting about the variable name total.. that's not the point of the example, but the order in which things are processed. this is the same as the top answer, but chronologically was answered before it. thumbs up – vsync Jul 9 '18 at 16:47
6

Array.reduceRight() is great when:

  • you need to iterate over an Array of items to create HTML
  • AND need a counter in HTML prior to the items

.

var bands = {
    Beatles: [
        {name: "John", instruments: "Guitar"},
        {name: "Paul", instruments: "Guitar"},
        {name: "George", instruments: "Guitar"},
        {name: "Ringo", instruments: "Drums"}]
};
function listBandplayers(bandname, instrument) {
    var bandmembers = bands[bandname];
    var arr = [  "<B>" , 0 , ` of ${bandmembers.length} ${bandname} play ` , instrument , "</B>",
                "\n<UL>" , ...bandmembers , "\n</UL>" ];
    var countidx = 1;
    return arr.reduceRight((html, item, idx, _array) => {
            if (typeof item === 'object') {
                if (item.instruments.contains(instrument)) _array[countidx]++;
                item = `\n\t<LI data-instruments="${item.instruments}">` + item.name + "</LI>";
            }
            return item + html;
    });
}
console.log( listBandplayers('Beatles', 'Drums') );
/*
<B>1 of 4 Beatles play Drums</B>
<UL>
    <LI data-instruments="Guitar">John</LI>
    <LI data-instruments="Guitar">Paul</LI>
    <LI data-instruments="Guitar">George</LI>
    <LI data-instruments="Drums">Ringo</LI>
</UL>
*/
console.log( listBandplayers('Beatles', 'Guitar') );
/*
<B>3 of 4 Beatles play Guitar</B>
<UL>
    <LI data-instruments="Guitar">John</LI>
    <LI data-instruments="Guitar">Paul</LI>
    <LI data-instruments="Guitar">George</LI>
    <LI data-instruments="Drums">Ringo</LI>
</UL>
*/
  • vote up for good example. but actually not that practical ! – koo Mar 5 at 13:01
3

ReduceRight is different from reduce method as it starts computation on values from right to left.

Reference: http://www.thesstech.com/javascript/array_redcueright_method

Reduce Example:

<!doctype html>
<html>
 <head>
 <script>
   var arr = [1,2,3];
   document.write(arr.reduce(function(x,y){return x*y;},4));
 </script>
 </head>
</html>

Starting from left to right: 1*2 = 2*3 = 6 * 4 = 24

Ref:http://www.thesstech.com/tryme?filename=javascript_array_reduce_method

ReduceRight Example

<!doctype html>
<html>
 <head>
 <script>
   var arr = [4,256];
   document.write(arr.reduceRight(function(x,y){return x/y;},1024));
 </script>
 </head>
</html>

Starting from right to left: 1024/256 = 4/4 = 1

Ref:http://www.thesstech.com/tryme?filename=javascript_array_reduceright_method

  • code only are frown upon – styvane Sep 30 '15 at 4:28
  • What is the problem with code @user3100115? – Sohail Arif Oct 1 '15 at 6:53
  • Think it'd help people if you showed the reduce example as 4*1 = 4 * 2 = 8 * 3 = 24 instead of multiplying the initial value last – Gwater17 Sep 11 '16 at 18:51
2

Do correct me if I am wrong;

My understanding is that, solely in the context of Array, the fundamental difference between reduce and reduceRight - other than just the direction - is that in previous moments of history (before browser optimisations etc), compilers would count backwards from 10 to 0, (arr.reduceRight - right-to-left), a lot faster than counting forwards from 0 to 10 (arr.reduce - left-to-right).

Reducing from the right meant that the compiler could start at 10 and the iterator could only ever get to 0. This meant that the compiler, on each iteration, had to check that the current iteration is greater than 0. Easy peasy.

However, when reducing from the left (arr.reduce - left-to-right), the length of the collection could possibly change, and thus the compiler having to re-evaluate arr.length on each iteration.

For an example, if you had an array of 10 using Array(10), and you used arr.reduce() - left-to-right, the compiler would have to check to make sure nothing else is pushed on to the collection during the reduce, in order to determine its position - on each iteration.

I hope this helps someone :)

  • I don't know if this is correct. But makes sense and wanted to say thank you for this reply. I was looking at why there's reduce and reduceRight. In functional libs reduce is = to reduceRight so i was curious of the difference – TryingToLearnJS Feb 25 at 12:09
  • This makes sense to me. – Huan Mar 6 at 18:14
0

The only thing is order of computation. Reduce does it 'left to right', reduceRight does it 'right to left'. See the following example:

<html>

<head></head> 

<body> 

<script>

var a = [200, 100, 2];
var c = a.reduce(function(previousVal, currentVal){ 
previousVal = previousVal / currentVal; 
return previousVal;  
});
var c = a.reduceRight(function(previousVal, currentVal){ 
previousVal = previousVal / currentVal; 
return previousVal;  
});
alert(c);

</script> 

</body> 

</html> 
</html> 

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