76

Is there any easy/general way to clean an XML based data source prior to using it in an XmlReader so that I can gracefully consume XML data that is non-conformant to the hexadecimal character restrictions placed on XML?

Note:

  • The solution needs to handle XML data sources that use character encodings other than UTF-8, e.g. by specifying the character encoding at the XML document declaration. Not mangling the character encoding of the source while stripping invalid hexadecimal characters has been a major sticking point.
  • The removal of invalid hexadecimal characters should only remove hexadecimal encoded values, as you can often find href values in data that happens to contains a string that would be a string match for a hexadecimal character.

Background:

I need to consume an XML-based data source that conforms to a specific format (think Atom or RSS feeds), but want to be able to consume data sources that have been published which contain invalid hexadecimal characters per the XML specification.

In .NET if you have a Stream that represents the XML data source, and then attempt to parse it using an XmlReader and/or XPathDocument, an exception is raised due to the inclusion of invalid hexadecimal characters in the XML data. My current attempt to resolve this issue is to parse the Stream as a string and use a regular expression to remove and/or replace the invalid hexadecimal characters, but I am looking for a more performant solution.

14 Answers 14

78

It may not be perfect (emphasis added since people missing this disclaimer), but what I've done in that case is below. You can adjust to use with a stream.

/// <summary>
/// Removes control characters and other non-UTF-8 characters
/// </summary>
/// <param name="inString">The string to process</param>
/// <returns>A string with no control characters or entities above 0x00FD</returns>
public static string RemoveTroublesomeCharacters(string inString)
{
    if (inString == null) return null;

    StringBuilder newString = new StringBuilder();
    char ch;

    for (int i = 0; i < inString.Length; i++)
    {

        ch = inString[i];
        // remove any characters outside the valid UTF-8 range as well as all control characters
        // except tabs and new lines
        //if ((ch < 0x00FD && ch > 0x001F) || ch == '\t' || ch == '\n' || ch == '\r')
        //if using .NET version prior to 4, use above logic
        if (XmlConvert.IsXmlChar(ch)) //this method is new in .NET 4
        {
            newString.Append(ch);
        }
    }
    return newString.ToString();

}
8
  • 1
    try dnewcome's solution below. Sep 21, 2010 at 17:07
  • 2
    -1 this answer is misleading because it removes characters that are valid in XML, that are not control characters, and that are valid UTF-8. Sep 2, 2011 at 15:43
  • 2
    If you want to update the answer with a better range of filters, feel free to do so. As my answer states, it may not be perfect, but it served my needs. Oct 21, 2011 at 18:52
  • 3
    I used XmlConvert.IsXmlChar(ch) for my filter.
    – Brad J
    Feb 25, 2015 at 16:27
  • 1
    @BradJ, very good point. The method seems to have been added in .NET 4, so switched code to just use that in the example. Thanks! Feb 25, 2015 at 20:21
60

I like Eugene's whitelist concept. I needed to do a similar thing as the original poster, but I needed to support all Unicode characters, not just up to 0x00FD. The XML spec is:

Char = #x9 | #xA | #xD | [#x20-#xD7FF] | [#xE000-#xFFFD] | [#x10000-#x10FFFF]

In .NET, the internal representation of Unicode characters is only 16 bits, so we can't `allow' 0x10000-0x10FFFF explicitly. The XML spec explicitly disallows the surrogate code points starting at 0xD800 from appearing. However it is possible that if we allowed these surrogate code points in our whitelist, utf-8 encoding our string might produce valid XML in the end as long as proper utf-8 encoding was produced from the surrogate pairs of utf-16 characters in the .NET string. I haven't explored this though, so I went with the safer bet and didn't allow the surrogates in my whitelist.

The comments in Eugene's solution are misleading though, the problem is that the characters we are excluding are not valid in XML ... they are perfectly valid Unicode code points. We are not removing `non-utf-8 characters'. We are removing utf-8 characters that may not appear in well-formed XML documents.

public static string XmlCharacterWhitelist( string in_string ) {
    if( in_string == null ) return null;

    StringBuilder sbOutput = new StringBuilder();
    char ch;

    for( int i = 0; i < in_string.Length; i++ ) {
        ch = in_string[i];
        if( ( ch >= 0x0020 && ch <= 0xD7FF ) || 
            ( ch >= 0xE000 && ch <= 0xFFFD ) ||
            ch == 0x0009 ||
            ch == 0x000A || 
            ch == 0x000D ) {
            sbOutput.Append( ch );
        }
    }
    return sbOutput.ToString();
}
2
  • it will append & and this causes doc = XDocument.Load(@strXMLPath); to give exception
    – CODError
    Feb 18, 2014 at 9:07
  • 1
    hello, do you think XmlConvert.IsXmlChar() would be more accurate? Eugene's answer changed since your last comment. thanks
    – DaFi4
    Apr 7, 2017 at 9:53
32

As the way to remove invalid XML characters I suggest you to use XmlConvert.IsXmlChar method. It was added since .NET Framework 4 and is presented in Silverlight too. Here is the small sample:

void Main() {
    string content = "\v\f\0";
    Console.WriteLine(IsValidXmlString(content)); // False

    content = RemoveInvalidXmlChars(content);
    Console.WriteLine(IsValidXmlString(content)); // True
}

static string RemoveInvalidXmlChars(string text) {
    char[] validXmlChars = text.Where(ch => XmlConvert.IsXmlChar(ch)).ToArray();
    return new string(validXmlChars);
}

static bool IsValidXmlString(string text) {
    try {
        XmlConvert.VerifyXmlChars(text);
        return true;
    } catch {
        return false;
    }
}
13

DRY implementation of this answer's solution (using a different constructor - feel free to use the one you need in your application):

public class InvalidXmlCharacterReplacingStreamReader : StreamReader
{
    private readonly char _replacementCharacter;

    public InvalidXmlCharacterReplacingStreamReader(string fileName, char replacementCharacter) : base(fileName)
    {
        this._replacementCharacter = replacementCharacter;
    }

    public override int Peek()
    {
        int ch = base.Peek();
        if (ch != -1 && IsInvalidChar(ch))
        {
            return this._replacementCharacter;
        }
        return ch;
    }

    public override int Read()
    {
        int ch = base.Read();
        if (ch != -1 && IsInvalidChar(ch))
        {
            return this._replacementCharacter;
        }
        return ch;
    }

    public override int Read(char[] buffer, int index, int count)
    {
        int readCount = base.Read(buffer, index, count);
        for (int i = index; i < readCount + index; i++)
        {
            char ch = buffer[i];
            if (IsInvalidChar(ch))
            {
                buffer[i] = this._replacementCharacter;
            }
        }
        return readCount;
    }

    private static bool IsInvalidChar(int ch)
    {
        return (ch < 0x0020 || ch > 0xD7FF) &&
               (ch < 0xE000 || ch > 0xFFFD) &&
                ch != 0x0009 &&
                ch != 0x000A &&
                ch != 0x000D;
    }
}
4
  • maybe its better to use XmlConvert.IsXmlChar() over the ch range checks? what do you think?
    – DaFi4
    Apr 7, 2017 at 9:51
  • @montewhizdoh: IsXmlChar is new in .NET 4. If that's available to you, feel free to use. This solution is .NET 2.0+. Apr 7, 2017 at 11:29
  • 1
    The same approach I have implemented for myself, but by I inherited from Stream which was not such a good idea because Stream.Read() operated with the array of bytes, not chars and it wasn't as elegant to check the characters. Your solution by inheriting from StreamReader is better, thank you!
    – Mar
    Sep 7, 2017 at 6:36
  • 1
    +1 Because this allows reading REALLY big XML files (successfully tested with 100MB files). Solutions that loaded everything into a String before filtering out the bad characters failed with OutOfMemory exceptions. Nov 2, 2017 at 21:11
9

Modernising dnewcombe's answer, you could take a slightly simpler approach

public static string RemoveInvalidXmlChars(string input)
{
    var isValid = new Predicate<char>(value =>
        (value >= 0x0020 && value <= 0xD7FF) ||
        (value >= 0xE000 && value <= 0xFFFD) ||
        value == 0x0009 ||
        value == 0x000A ||
        value == 0x000D);

    return new string(Array.FindAll(input.ToCharArray(), isValid));
}

or, with Linq

public static string RemoveInvalidXmlChars(string input)
{
    return new string(input.Where(value =>
        (value >= 0x0020 && value <= 0xD7FF) ||
        (value >= 0xE000 && value <= 0xFFFD) ||
        value == 0x0009 ||
        value == 0x000A ||
        value == 0x000D).ToArray());
}

I'd be interested to know how the performance of these methods compares and how they all compare to a black list approach using Buffer.BlockCopy.

5
  • I have had an issue with the Linq method throwing System.OutOfMemoryException when the XML string on larger XML files.
    – Brad J
    Feb 25, 2015 at 16:11
  • @BradJ presumably, the string passed in is very long in those cases?
    – Jodrell
    Feb 25, 2015 at 16:14
  • @BradJ ultimately, some sort of stream transform would be better, you could pass that directly to XmlReader.Create instead of loading the whole file into a string in memory.
    – Jodrell
    Feb 25, 2015 at 16:41
  • 2
    just did a speed test compared to dnewcombe's answer and both of your solutions are about 3-4 times faster with the Linq version being only slightly slower than your non linq version. I was not expecting that sort of difference. used long strings and 100k iterations with stopwatch to work out timings.
    – Seer
    May 14, 2015 at 3:49
  • @Seer I'm using ~60k length character streams and this solution works out to be a bit slower than the StringBuilder method, not sure what I've done differently.
    – adotout
    Jul 8, 2016 at 15:36
5

Here is dnewcome's answer in a custom StreamReader. It simply wraps a real stream reader and replaces the characters as they are read.

I only implemented a few methods to save myself time. I used this in conjunction with XDocument.Load and a file stream and only the Read(char[] buffer, int index, int count) method was called, so it worked like this. You may need to implement additional methods to get this to work for your application. I used this approach because it seems more efficient than the other answers. I also only implemented one of the constructors, you could obviously implement any of the StreamReader constructors that you need, since it is just a pass through.

I chose to replace the characters rather than removing them because it greatly simplifies the solution. In this way the length of the text stays the same, so there is no need to keep track of a separate index.

public class InvalidXmlCharacterReplacingStreamReader : TextReader
{
    private StreamReader implementingStreamReader;
    private char replacementCharacter;

    public InvalidXmlCharacterReplacingStreamReader(Stream stream, char replacementCharacter)
    {
        implementingStreamReader = new StreamReader(stream);
        this.replacementCharacter = replacementCharacter;
    }

    public override void Close()
    {
        implementingStreamReader.Close();
    }

    public override ObjRef CreateObjRef(Type requestedType)
    {
        return implementingStreamReader.CreateObjRef(requestedType);
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        implementingStreamReader.Dispose();
    }

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        return implementingStreamReader.Equals(obj);
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return implementingStreamReader.GetHashCode();
    }

    public override object InitializeLifetimeService()
    {
        return implementingStreamReader.InitializeLifetimeService();
    }

    public override int Peek()
    {
        int ch = implementingStreamReader.Peek();
        if (ch != -1)
        {
            if (
                (ch < 0x0020 || ch > 0xD7FF) &&
                (ch < 0xE000 || ch > 0xFFFD) &&
                ch != 0x0009 &&
                ch != 0x000A &&
                ch != 0x000D
                )
            {
                return replacementCharacter;
            }
        }
        return ch;
    }

    public override int Read()
    {
        int ch = implementingStreamReader.Read();
        if (ch != -1)
        {
            if (
                (ch < 0x0020 || ch > 0xD7FF) &&
                (ch < 0xE000 || ch > 0xFFFD) &&
                ch != 0x0009 &&
                ch != 0x000A &&
                ch != 0x000D
                )
            {
                return replacementCharacter;
            }
        }
        return ch;
    }

    public override int Read(char[] buffer, int index, int count)
    {
        int readCount = implementingStreamReader.Read(buffer, index, count);
        for (int i = index; i < readCount+index; i++)
        {
            char ch = buffer[i];
            if (
                (ch < 0x0020 || ch > 0xD7FF) &&
                (ch < 0xE000 || ch > 0xFFFD) &&
                ch != 0x0009 &&
                ch != 0x000A &&
                ch != 0x000D
                )
            {
                buffer[i] = replacementCharacter;
            }
        }
        return readCount;
    }

    public override Task<int> ReadAsync(char[] buffer, int index, int count)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public override int ReadBlock(char[] buffer, int index, int count)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public override Task<int> ReadBlockAsync(char[] buffer, int index, int count)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public override string ReadLine()
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public override Task<string> ReadLineAsync()
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public override string ReadToEnd()
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public override Task<string> ReadToEndAsync()
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return implementingStreamReader.ToString();
    }
}
3
  • Ultimately, this is the right idea but your implementation could be DRYer.
    – Jodrell
    Feb 25, 2015 at 16:42
  • @Jodrell: Added a DRY version here. May 20, 2015 at 13:37
  • 1
    @Neolisk: Thanks! I probably should have cleaned this up before posting it :)
    – Ryan Adams
    Jan 28, 2016 at 22:38
4

Regex based approach

public static string StripInvalidXmlCharacters(string str)
{
    var invalidXmlCharactersRegex = new Regex("[^\u0009\u000a\u000d\u0020-\ud7ff\ue000-\ufffd]|([\ud800-\udbff](?![\udc00-\udfff]))|((?<![\ud800-\udbff])[\udc00-\udfff])");
    return invalidXmlCharactersRegex.Replace(str, "");

}

See my blogpost for more details

1
  • 1
    This is ~50x slower than dnewcome's solution on my machine.
    – adotout
    Jul 8, 2016 at 15:30
3

I created a slightly updated version of @Neolisk's answer, which supports the *Async functions and uses the .Net 4.0 XmlConvert.IsXmlChar function.

public class InvalidXmlCharacterReplacingStreamReader : StreamReader
{
    private readonly char _replacementCharacter;

    public InvalidXmlCharacterReplacingStreamReader(string fileName, char replacementCharacter) : base(fileName)
    {
        _replacementCharacter = replacementCharacter;
    }

    public InvalidXmlCharacterReplacingStreamReader(Stream stream, char replacementCharacter) : base(stream)
    {
        _replacementCharacter = replacementCharacter;
    }

    public override int Peek()
    {
        var ch = base.Peek();
        if (ch != -1 && IsInvalidChar(ch))
        {
            return _replacementCharacter;
        }
        return ch;
    }

    public override int Read()
    {
        var ch = base.Read();
        if (ch != -1 && IsInvalidChar(ch))
        {
            return _replacementCharacter;
        }
        return ch;
    }

    public override int Read(char[] buffer, int index, int count)
    {
        var readCount = base.Read(buffer, index, count);
        ReplaceInBuffer(buffer, index, readCount);
        return readCount;
    }

    public override async Task<int> ReadAsync(char[] buffer, int index, int count)
    {
        var readCount = await base.ReadAsync(buffer, index, count).ConfigureAwait(false);
        ReplaceInBuffer(buffer, index, readCount);
        return readCount;
    }

    private void ReplaceInBuffer(char[] buffer, int index, int readCount)
    {
        for (var i = index; i < readCount + index; i++)
        {
            var ch = buffer[i];
            if (IsInvalidChar(ch))
            {
                buffer[i] = _replacementCharacter;
            }
        }
    }

    private static bool IsInvalidChar(int ch)
    {
        return IsInvalidChar((char)ch);
    }

    private static bool IsInvalidChar(char ch)
    {
        return !XmlConvert.IsXmlChar(ch);
    }
}
2

The above solutions seem to be for removing invalid characters prior to converting to XML.

Use this code to remove invalid XML characters from an XML string. eg. &x1A;

    public static string CleanInvalidXmlChars( string Xml, string XMLVersion )
    {
        string pattern = String.Empty;
        switch( XMLVersion )
        {
            case "1.0":
                pattern = @"&#x((10?|[2-F])FFF[EF]|FDD[0-9A-F]|7F|8[0-46-9A-F]9[0-9A-F]);";
                break;
            case "1.1":
                pattern = @"&#x((10?|[2-F])FFF[EF]|FDD[0-9A-F]|[19][0-9A-F]|7F|8[0-46-9A-F]|0?[1-8BCEF]);";
                break;
            default:
                throw new Exception( "Error: Invalid XML Version!" );
        }

        Regex regex = new Regex( pattern, RegexOptions.IgnoreCase );
        if( regex.IsMatch( Xml ) )
            Xml = regex.Replace( Xml, String.Empty );
        return Xml;
    }

http://balajiramesh.wordpress.com/2008/05/30/strip-illegal-xml-characters-based-on-w3c-standard/

1
  • 1
    -1 This answer does not address the question asked, and in any case is wrong and misleading because it only removes invalid XML Character Entity References, but not invalid XML characters. Sep 2, 2011 at 15:53
1

Modified answer or original answer by Neolisk above.
Changes: of \0 character is passed, removal is done, rather than a replacement. also, made use of XmlConvert.IsXmlChar(char) method

    /// <summary>
    /// Replaces invalid Xml characters from input file, NOTE: if replacement character is \0, then invalid Xml character is removed, instead of 1-for-1 replacement
    /// </summary>
    public class InvalidXmlCharacterReplacingStreamReader : StreamReader
    {
        private readonly char _replacementCharacter;

        public InvalidXmlCharacterReplacingStreamReader(string fileName, char replacementCharacter)
            : base(fileName)
        {
            _replacementCharacter = replacementCharacter;
        }

        public override int Peek()
        {
            int ch = base.Peek();
            if (ch != -1 && IsInvalidChar(ch))
            {
                if ('\0' == _replacementCharacter)
                    return Peek(); // peek at the next one

                return _replacementCharacter;
            }
            return ch;
        }

        public override int Read()
        {
            int ch = base.Read();
            if (ch != -1 && IsInvalidChar(ch))
            {
                if ('\0' == _replacementCharacter)
                    return Read(); // read next one

                return _replacementCharacter;
            }
            return ch;
        }

        public override int Read(char[] buffer, int index, int count)
        {
            int readCount= 0, ch;

            for (int i = 0; i < count && (ch = Read()) != -1; i++)
            {
                readCount++;
                buffer[index + i] = (char)ch;
            }

            return readCount;
        }


        private static bool IsInvalidChar(int ch)
        {
            return !XmlConvert.IsXmlChar((char)ch);
        }
    }
0

Use this function to remove invalid xml characters.

public static string CleanInvalidXmlChars(string text)   
{   
       string re = @"[^\x09\x0A\x0D\x20-\xD7FF\xE000-\xFFFD\x10000-x10FFFF]";   
       return Regex.Replace(text, re, "");   
} 
-1
private static String removeNonUtf8CompliantCharacters( final String inString ) {
    if (null == inString ) return null;
    byte[] byteArr = inString.getBytes();
    for ( int i=0; i < byteArr.length; i++ ) {
        byte ch= byteArr[i]; 
        // remove any characters outside the valid UTF-8 range as well as all control characters
        // except tabs and new lines
        if ( !( (ch > 31 && ch < 253 ) || ch == '\t' || ch == '\n' || ch == '\r') ) {
            byteArr[i]=' ';
        }
    }
    return new String( byteArr );
}
1
  • 1
    -1 This answer is misleading and wrong because it removes characters that are valid in both Unicode and XML. Sep 2, 2011 at 15:52
-1

You can pass non-UTF characters with the following:

string sFinalString  = "";
string hex = "";
foreach (char ch in UTFCHAR)
{
    int tmp = ch;
   if ((ch < 0x00FD && ch > 0x001F) || ch == '\t' || ch == '\n' || ch == '\r')
    {
    sFinalString  += ch;
    }
    else
    {  
      sFinalString  += "&#" + tmp+";";
    }
}
3
  • 1
    -1 This answer is wrong because it generates invalid XML character entity references (for example &#1; is not a valid XML character entity reference). Also it is misleading because it removes characters that are valid in both Unicode and XML. Sep 2, 2011 at 15:50
  • ya thats true but above solution is for if you want to pass invalid xml in xml file, than it will work or you cant pass invalid xml character in xml document Jan 6, 2012 at 13:29
  • You can’t pass invalid XML characters in an XML document no matter what you do. For instance, the character U+0001 START OF HEADING is not allowed in a well-formed XML document, and even if you try to escape it as &#1;, that’s still not allowed in a well-formed XML document. Jan 10, 2012 at 14:38
-5

Try this for PHP!

$goodUTF8 = iconv("utf-8", "utf-8//IGNORE", $badUTF8);

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