432

I have a Numpy array consisting of a list of lists, representing a two-dimensional array with row labels and column names as shown below:

data = np.array([['','Col1','Col2'],['Row1',1,2],['Row2',3,4]])

I'd like the resulting DataFrame to have Row1 and Row2 as index values, and Col1, Col2 as header values.

I can specify the index as follows:

df = pd.DataFrame(data, index=data[:,0])

However, I am unsure how to best assign column headers.

1
  • 5
    @behzad.nouri's answer is correct, but I think you should consider if you cannot have the initial data in another form. Because now, your values will be strings and not ints (because of the numpy array mixing ints and strings, so all are casted to string because numpy arrays have to be homogeneous).
    – joris
    Dec 24, 2013 at 15:54

10 Answers 10

437

Specify data, index and columns to the DataFrame constructor, as follows:

>>> pd.DataFrame(data=data[1:,1:],    # values
...              index=data[1:,0],    # 1st column as index
...              columns=data[0,1:])  # 1st row as the column names

As @joris mentions, you may need to change above to np.int_(data[1:,1:]) to have the correct data type.

2
  • 10
    this works - but for such a common structure of input data and desired application to a DataFrame is there not some "shortcut"? This is basically the way that csvs are loaded - and can be managed by the default handling for many csv readers. An analogous structure for df's would be useful. Nov 17, 2018 at 20:26
  • 1
    I added a mini helper/convenience method for this as a supplemental answer. Nov 17, 2018 at 21:03
178

Here is an easy to understand solution

import numpy as np
import pandas as pd

# Creating a 2 dimensional numpy array
>>> data = np.array([[5.8, 2.8], [6.0, 2.2]])
>>> print(data)
>>> data
array([[5.8, 2.8],
       [6. , 2.2]])

# Creating pandas dataframe from numpy array
>>> dataset = pd.DataFrame({'Column1': data[:, 0], 'Column2': data[:, 1]})
>>> print(dataset)
   Column1  Column2
0      5.8      2.8
1      6.0      2.2
2
  • 53
    But you had to manually specify the Series names .. that's not scalable. Nov 17, 2018 at 20:25
  • 1
    As a counterpoint, you could use a dict comprehension to specify the names automatically: dataset = pd.DataFrame({f'Column{i+1}': data[:,i] for i in range(data.shape[1])}), but as a counterpoint, if you have a lot of columns, then this would indeed not be scalable.
    – rayryeng
    Oct 5, 2023 at 15:18
30

I agree with Joris; it seems like you should be doing this differently, like with numpy record arrays. Modifying "option 2" from this great answer, you could do it like this:

import pandas
import numpy

dtype = [('Col1','int32'), ('Col2','float32'), ('Col3','float32')]
values = numpy.zeros(20, dtype=dtype)
index = ['Row'+str(i) for i in range(1, len(values)+1)]

df = pandas.DataFrame(values, index=index)
30

This can be done simply by using from_records of pandas DataFrame

import numpy as np
import pandas as pd
# Creating a numpy array
x = np.arange(1,10,1).reshape(-1,1)
dataframe = pd.DataFrame.from_records(x)
2
  • This answer does not work with the example data provided in the question, i.e. data = array([['','Col1','Col2'],['Row1',1,2],['Row2',3,4]]).
    – jpp
    Oct 7, 2018 at 12:47
  • 1
    The simplest general solution when we have not specified the labels.
    – cerebrou
    Apr 17, 2020 at 10:40
18
    >>import pandas as pd
    >>import numpy as np
    >>data.shape
    (480,193)
    >>type(data)
    numpy.ndarray
    >>df=pd.DataFrame(data=data[0:,0:],
    ...        index=[i for i in range(data.shape[0])],
    ...        columns=['f'+str(i) for i in range(data.shape[1])])
    >>df.head()
    [![array to dataframe][1]][1]

enter image description here

0
11

Here simple example to create pandas dataframe by using numpy array.

import numpy as np
import pandas as pd

# create an array 
var1  = np.arange(start=1, stop=21, step=1).reshape(-1)
var2 = np.random.rand(20,1).reshape(-1)
print(var1.shape)
print(var2.shape)

dataset = pd.DataFrame()
dataset['col1'] = var1
dataset['col2'] = var2
dataset.head()
9

Adding to @behzad.nouri 's answer - we can create a helper routine to handle this common scenario:

def csvDf(dat,**kwargs): 
  from numpy import array
  data = array(dat)
  if data is None or len(data)==0 or len(data[0])==0:
    return None
  else:
    return pd.DataFrame(data[1:,1:],index=data[1:,0],columns=data[0,1:],**kwargs)

Let's try it out:

data = [['','a','b','c'],['row1','row1cola','row1colb','row1colc'],
     ['row2','row2cola','row2colb','row2colc'],['row3','row3cola','row3colb','row3colc']]
csvDf(data)

In [61]: csvDf(data)
Out[61]:
             a         b         c
row1  row1cola  row1colb  row1colc
row2  row2cola  row2colb  row2colc
row3  row3cola  row3colb  row3colc
9

I think this is a simple and intuitive method:

data = np.array([[0, 0], [0, 1] , [1, 0] , [1, 1]])
reward = np.array([1,0,1,0])

dataset = pd.DataFrame()
dataset['StateAttributes'] = data.tolist()
dataset['reward'] = reward.tolist()

dataset

returns:

enter image description here

But there are performance implications detailed here:

How to set the value of a pandas column as list

2
  • returns error 'numpy.ndarray' object has no attribute 'toList'
    – ozmank
    May 5, 2022 at 21:24
  • numpy ndarrays have an attribute tolist, not toList. i.e. reward.tolist()
    – Matt Payne
    Dec 21, 2023 at 15:37
1

It's not so short, but maybe can help you.

Creating Array

import numpy as np
import pandas as pd

data = np.array([['col1', 'col2'], [4.8, 2.8], [7.0, 1.2]])

>>> data
array([['col1', 'col2'],
       ['4.8', '2.8'],
       ['7.0', '1.2']], dtype='<U4')

Creating data frame

df = pd.DataFrame(i for i in data).transpose()
df.drop(0, axis=1, inplace=True)
df.columns = data[0]
df

>>> df
  col1 col2
0  4.8  7.0
1  2.8  1.2
1

1. Dtypes need to be recast

The problem with the original array is that it mixes strings with numbers, so the dtype of the array is either object or str which is not optimal for the dataframe. That can be remedied by calling astype at the end of dataframe construction.

df = pd.DataFrame(data[1:, 1:], index=data[1:, 0], columns=data[0, 1:]).astype(int)

2. Use read_csv for convenience

Since data in the OP is almost like a text file read in as a numpy array, one could convert it into a file-like object (using StringIO from the built-in io module) and use pd.read_csv instead. Since read_csv reads the first row as column labels, the only thing that needs to be specified is to read the first column as index. Also, read_csv infers the dtypes, so no need for astype() etc. either.

from io import StringIO
df = pd.read_csv(StringIO('\n'.join([','.join(row) for row in data.tolist()])), index_col=[0])

A convenience wrapper function for the latter case:

from io import StringIO
def read_array(data, index_col=[0], header=0):
    sio = StringIO('\n'.join([','.join(row) for row in data.tolist()]))
    return pd.read_csv(sio, index_col=index_col, header=header)

df = read_array(data)

res

One advantage of this method is that if there were MultiIndex columns or indices, there will need to be some manual work to construct the dataframe correctly with pd.DataFrame. Meanwhile, it's very easy with read_array() (because read_csv handles it internally, just delegate that stuff to pandas). For example, for the following data, just specify which rows are supposed to be read in as headers:

data = np.array([['', 'Col0', 'Col0'], ['', 'Col1', 'Col2'], ['Row1', 1, 2],['Row2', 3, 4]])

df = read_array(data, header=[0,1])

# to produce the equivalent with pd.DataFrame, pd.MultiIndex object needs to be constructed
df = pd.DataFrame(data[2:, 1:], index=data[2:, 0], columns=pd.MultiIndex.from_arrays(data[:2, 1:])).astype(int)

res3

3. Cast numpy arrays to dataframe

This is for different cases than specified in the OP but in general, it's possible to cast a numpy array immediately into a pandas dataframe. If a custom stringified column labels are needed, just call add_prefix(). For example,

arr = np.arange(9).reshape(-1,3)
df = pd.DataFrame(arr).add_prefix('Col')

res2

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