11

i am Looking for the best way to group data in elasticsearch. Elasticsearch doesnt support something like 'group by' in sql.

Lets say i have 1k categories and millions of products. what do you think is the best way to render a complete category tree? of couse jou need some metadata (icon, link-target, seo-titles,...) and custom sorting for the categories.

  1. Using Aggregations: Example: https://found.no/play/gist/8124563 looks useable if you have to group by one field, and need some extra fields.

  2. Using multiple Fields in a Facet (wont work) Example: https://found.no/play/gist/1aa44e2114975384a7c2 Here we lose the relation between the different fields.

  3. Building funny Facets https://found.no/play/gist/8124810

for example building a category tree using this 3 "solutions" sucks. Solution 1 may work (ES 1 isnt stable right now) Solution 2 doesnt work Solution 3 is pain, because it feels ugly, you need to prepare a lot of data and the facets blow up.

May an alternative could be not to store any category data in ES, just the id https://found.no/play/gist/a53e46c91e2bf077f2e1

than you could get the assocated category from another system, like redis, memcache or the database.

this would end up in clean code, but the performance could become a problem. for example loading 1k Categories from memcache / Redis / a database could be slow. another problem is that syncing 2 databases is harder than syncing one.

how do you deal with such problems?

i am sorry for the links, but i cant post more than 2 ones in one article.

24

The aggregations API allows grouping by multiple fields, using sub-aggregations. Suppose you want to group by fields field1, field2 and field3:

{
  "aggs": {
    "agg1": {
      "terms": {
        "field": "field1"
      },
      "aggs": {
        "agg2": {
          "terms": {
            "field": "field2"
          },
          "aggs": {
            "agg3": {
              "terms": {
                "field": "field3"
              }
            }
          }          
        }
      }
    }
  }
}

Of course this can go on for as many fields as you'd like.

Update:
For completeness, here is how the output of the above query looks. Also below is python code for generating the aggregation query and flattening the result into a list of dictionaries.

{
  "aggregations": {
    "agg1": {
      "buckets": [{
        "doc_count": <count>,
        "key": <value of field1>,
        "agg2": {
          "buckets": [{
            "doc_count": <count>,
            "key": <value of field2>,
            "agg3": {
              "buckets": [{
                "doc_count": <count>,
                "key": <value of field3>
              },
              {
                "doc_count": <count>,
                "key": <value of field3>
              }, ...
              ]
            },
            {
            "doc_count": <count>,
            "key": <value of field2>,
            "agg3": {
              "buckets": [{
                "doc_count": <count>,
                "key": <value of field3>
              },
              {
                "doc_count": <count>,
                "key": <value of field3>
              }, ...
              ]
            }, ...
          ]
        },
        {
        "doc_count": <count>,
        "key": <value of field1>,
        "agg2": {
          "buckets": [{
            "doc_count": <count>,
            "key": <value of field2>,
            "agg3": {
              "buckets": [{
                "doc_count": <count>,
                "key": <value of field3>
              },
              {
                "doc_count": <count>,
                "key": <value of field3>
              }, ...
              ]
            },
            {
            "doc_count": <count>,
            "key": <value of field2>,
            "agg3": {
              "buckets": [{
                "doc_count": <count>,
                "key": <value of field3>
              },
              {
                "doc_count": <count>,
                "key": <value of field3>
              }, ...
              ]
            }, ...
          ]
        }, ...
      ]
    }
  }
}

The following python code performs the group-by given the list of fields. I you specify include_missing=True, it also includes combinations of values where some of the fields are missing (you don't need it if you have version 2.0 of Elasticsearch thanks to this)

def group_by(es, fields, include_missing):
    current_level_terms = {'terms': {'field': fields[0]}}
    agg_spec = {fields[0]: current_level_terms}

    if include_missing:
        current_level_missing = {'missing': {'field': fields[0]}}
        agg_spec[fields[0] + '_missing'] = current_level_missing

    for field in fields[1:]:
        next_level_terms = {'terms': {'field': field}}
        current_level_terms['aggs'] = {
            field: next_level_terms,
        }

        if include_missing:
            next_level_missing = {'missing': {'field': field}}
            current_level_terms['aggs'][field + '_missing'] = next_level_missing
            current_level_missing['aggs'] = {
                field: next_level_terms,
                field + '_missing': next_level_missing,
            }
            current_level_missing = next_level_missing

        current_level_terms = next_level_terms

    agg_result = es.search(body={'aggs': agg_spec})['aggregations']
    return get_docs_from_agg_result(agg_result, fields, include_missing)


def get_docs_from_agg_result(agg_result, fields, include_missing):
    current_field = fields[0]
    buckets = agg_result[current_field]['buckets']
    if include_missing:
        buckets.append(agg_result[(current_field + '_missing')])

    if len(fields) == 1:
        return [
            {
                current_field: bucket.get('key'),
                'doc_count': bucket['doc_count'],
            }
            for bucket in buckets if bucket['doc_count'] > 0
        ]

    result = []
    for bucket in buckets:
        records = get_docs_from_agg_result(bucket, fields[1:], include_missing)
        value = bucket.get('key')
        for record in records:
            record[current_field] = value
        result.extend(records)

    return result
  • yeah, i post an example of exacly this ... – timg Jan 23 '14 at 20:07
4

I think some developers will be definitely looking same implementation in Spring DATA ES and JAVA ES API.

Please finds :-

List<FieldObject> fieldObjectList = Lists.newArrayList();
    SearchQuery aSearchQuery = new NativeSearchQueryBuilder().withQuery(matchAllQuery()).withIndices(indexName).withTypes(type)
            .addAggregation(
                    terms("ByField1").field("field1").subAggregation(AggregationBuilders.terms("ByField2").field("field2")
                            .subAggregation(AggregationBuilders.terms("ByField3").field("field3")))
                    )
            .build();
    Aggregations aField1Aggregations = elasticsearchTemplate.query(aSearchQuery, new ResultsExtractor<Aggregations>() {
        @Override
        public Aggregations extract(SearchResponse aResponse) {
            return aResponse.getAggregations();
        }
    });
    Terms aField1Terms = aField1Aggregations.get("ByField1");
    aField1Terms.getBuckets().stream().forEach(aField1Bucket -> {
        String field1Value = aField1Bucket.getKey();
        Terms aField2Terms = aField1Bucket.getAggregations().get("ByField2");

        aField2Terms.getBuckets().stream().forEach(aField2Bucket -> {
            String field2Value = aField2Bucket.getKey();
            Terms aField3Terms = aField2Bucket.getAggregations().get("ByField3");

            aField3Terms.getBuckets().stream().forEach(aField3Bucket -> {
                String field3Value = aField3Bucket.getKey();
                Long count = aField3Bucket.getDocCount();

                FieldObject fieldObject = new FieldObject();
                fieldObject.setField1(field1Value);
                fieldObject.setField2(field2Value);
                fieldObject.setField3(field3Value);
                fieldObject.setCount(count);
                fieldObjectList.add(fieldObject);
            });
        });
    });

imports need to be done for same :-

import static org.elasticsearch.index.query.QueryBuilders.matchAllQuery;
import static org.elasticsearch.search.aggregations.AggregationBuilders.terms; 
import org.elasticsearch.action.search.SearchResponse;
import org.elasticsearch.common.collect.Lists;
import org.elasticsearch.index.query.FilterBuilder;
import org.elasticsearch.index.query.FilterBuilders;
import org.elasticsearch.index.query.TermFilterBuilder;
import org.elasticsearch.search.aggregations.AggregationBuilders;
import org.elasticsearch.search.aggregations.Aggregations;
import org.elasticsearch.search.aggregations.bucket.filter.InternalFilter;
import org.elasticsearch.search.aggregations.bucket.terms.Terms;
import org.springframework.data.elasticsearch.core.ElasticsearchTemplate;
import org.springframework.data.elasticsearch.core.ResultsExtractor;
import org.springframework.data.elasticsearch.core.query.NativeSearchQueryBuilder;
import org.springframework.data.elasticsearch.core.query.SearchQuery;
1

sub-aggregations is what you need .. though this is never explicitly stated in the docs it can be found implicitly by structuring aggregations

It will result the sub-aggregation as if the query was filtered by result of the higher aggregation. It actually looks like as if this is what happens in there.

{
"aggregations": {
    "VALUE1AGG": {
      "terms": {
        "field": "VALUE1",
      },
      "aggregations": {
        "VALUE2AGG": {
           "terms": {
             "field": "VALUE2",
          }
        }
      }
    }
  }
}

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