I am trying to compare two tables, SQL Server, to verify some data. I want to return all the rows from both tables where data is either in one or the other. In essence, I want to show all the discrepancies. I need to check three pieces of data in doing so, FirstName, LastName and Product.

I'm fairly new to SQL and it seems like a lot of the solutions I'm finding are over complicating things. I don't have to worry about NULLs.

I started by trying something like this:

SELECT DISTINCT [First Name], [Last Name], [Product Name] FROM [Temp Test Data]
WHERE ([First Name] NOT IN (SELECT [First Name] 
FROM [Real Data]))

I'm having trouble taking this further though.

Thanks!

EDIT:

Based on the answer by @treaschf I have been trying to use a variation of the following query:

SELECT td.[First Name], td.[Last Name], td.[Product Name]
FROM [Temp Test Data] td FULL OUTER JOIN [Data] AS d 
ON td.[First Name] = d.[First Name] AND td.[Last Name] = d.[Last Name] 
WHERE (d.[First Name] = NULL) AND (d.[Last Name] = NULL)

But I keep getting 0 results back, when I know that there is at least 1 row in td that is not in d.

EDIT:

Ok, I think I figured it out. At least in my few minutes of testing it seems to work good enough.

SELECT [First Name], [Last Name]
FROM [Temp Test Data] AS td
WHERE (NOT EXISTS
        (SELECT [First Name], [Last Name]
         FROM [Data] AS d
         WHERE ([First Name] = td.[First Name]) OR ([Last Name] = td.[Last Name])))

This is basically going to tell me what is in my test data that is not in my real data. Which is completely fine for what I need to do.

  • 3
    The EXCEPT example below is about 100x faster than this one. – Eric Hanson Jan 21 '14 at 4:42
  • can someone confirm if this works? doesn't work on my end, also don't see the point of "AS d" if "d" is not used anywhere, could there be a mistake there somewhere? – Robert Sinclair Mar 17 '17 at 2:48

10 Answers 10

up vote 162 down vote accepted

IF you have tables A and B, both with colum C, here are the records, which are present in table A but not in B:

SELECT A.*
FROM A
    LEFT JOIN B ON (A.C = B.C)
WHERE B.C IS NULL

To get all the differences with a single query, a full join must be used, like this:

SELECT A.*, B.*
FROM A
    FULL JOIN B ON (A.C = B.C)
WHERE A.C IS NULL OR B.C IS NULL

What you need to know in this case is, that when a record can be found in A, but not in B, than the columns which come from B will be NULL, and similarly for those, which are present in B and not in A, the columns from A will be null.

  • I'm having trouble getting this working right, see my recent edit up top. – Casey Jan 16 '10 at 16:42
  • The problem might be that you cannot compare a value with null using '='. (Or at least when SET ANSI_NULLS is ON.) You must say: value IS NULL or value IS NOT NULL. – treaschf Jan 16 '10 at 17:17
  • I'm marking this as the answer I used because in doing this way I was able to easily do a few other things I had to later on. – Casey Jan 30 '10 at 23:38
  • The objects "a.dbo.student" and "b.dbo.student" in the FROM clause have the same exposed names. Use correlation names to distinguish them. I get error if table names are same and you pull them from two different databases. – Hammad Khan Jul 20 '11 at 19:10
  • @Thecrocodilehunter you need to change name of tables like a.dbo.student as and b.dbo.student bs then refer to tables with as and bs – AaA Mar 8 '12 at 3:53
(   SELECT * FROM table1
    EXCEPT
    SELECT * FROM table2)  
UNION ALL
(   SELECT * FROM table2
    EXCEPT
    SELECT * FROM table1) 
  • +1: This is the sensible way for SQL Server 2005+. – RedFilter Jan 16 '10 at 19:44
  • 1
    I get an error as well, Msg 205, Level 16, State 1, Line 5 All queries combined using a UNION, INTERSECT or EXCEPT operator must have an equal number of expressions in their target lists. – cdub Feb 5 '13 at 2:08
  • 2
    If you're getting an error, you need to make sure you select the same fields (same types) in the same order. SELECT * works if this is the case for all columns; if not, just select some subset. – ashes999 Mar 11 '13 at 16:14
  • 1
    Anyone with experience on large datasets could tell me if this solution would work for tables with 500.000+ rows, what about 50 million rows? – Michiel Cornille Jul 5 '13 at 14:33
  • 3
    Great answer. Is there a way I can add a field that will tell me which of the 2 tables the returned records are from? – Juan Velez Oct 18 '16 at 14:05

I know that this may not be a popular answer but I do agree with @Randy Minder on using third party tool when more complex comparison is needed.

This specific case here is easy and for this case such tools are not needed but this can get complex easily if you introduce more columns, databases on two servers, more complex comparison criteria and such.

There are a lot of these tools such as ApexSQL Data Diff or Quest Toad and you can always use them in trial mode to get the job done.

  • An example of a FOSS database-agnostic solution that works with any tabular sources of data from various databases or file systems is Diffkit. – wwmbes Feb 3 '17 at 9:17
  • Microsoft also has a SQL Server tablediff command line utility referred to here . – wwmbes Feb 3 '17 at 13:44

To get all the differences between two tables, you can use like me this SQL request :

SELECT 'TABLE1-ONLY' AS SRC, T1.*
FROM (
      SELECT * FROM Table1
      EXCEPT
      SELECT * FROM Table2
      ) AS T1
UNION ALL
SELECT 'TABLE2-ONLY' AS SRC, T2.*
FROM (
      SELECT * FROM Table2
      EXCEPT
      SELECT * FROM Table1
      ) AS T2
;

If you want to get which column values are different, you could use Entity-Attribute-Value model:

declare @Data1 xml, @Data2 xml

select @Data1 = 
(
    select * 
    from (select * from Test1 except select * from Test2) as a
    for xml raw('Data')
)

select @Data2 = 
(
    select * 
    from (select * from Test2 except select * from Test1) as a
    for xml raw('Data')
)

;with CTE1 as (
    select
        T.C.value('../@ID', 'bigint') as ID,
        T.C.value('local-name(.)', 'nvarchar(128)') as Name,
        T.C.value('.', 'nvarchar(max)') as Value
    from @Data1.nodes('Data/@*') as T(C)    
), CTE2 as (
    select
        T.C.value('../@ID', 'bigint') as ID,
        T.C.value('local-name(.)', 'nvarchar(128)') as Name,
        T.C.value('.', 'nvarchar(max)') as Value
    from @Data2.nodes('Data/@*') as T(C)     
)
select
    isnull(C1.ID, C2.ID) as ID, isnull(C1.Name, C2.Name) as Name, C1.Value as Value1, C2.Value as Value2
from CTE1 as C1
    full outer join CTE2 as C2 on C2.ID = C1.ID and C2.Name = C1.Name
where
not
(
    C1.Value is null and C2.Value is null or
    C1.Value is not null and C2.Value is not null and C1.Value = C2.Value
)

SQL FIDDLE EXAMPLE

Try this :

SELECT 
    [First Name], [Last Name]
FROM 
    [Temp Test Data] AS td EXCEPTION JOIN [Data] AS d ON 
         (d.[First Name] = td.[First Name] OR d.[Last Name] = td.[Last Name])

Much simpler to read.

This will do the trick, similar with Tiago's solution, return "source" table as well.

select [First name], [Last name], max(_tabloc) as _tabloc
from (
  select [First Name], [Last name], 't1' as _tabloc from table1
  union all
  select [First name], [Last name], 't2' as _tabloc from table2
) v
group by [Fist Name], [Last name]
having count(1)=1

result will contain differences between tables, in column _tabloc you will have table reference.

For a simple smoke test where you you're trying to ensure two tables match w/out worrying about column names:

--ensure tables have matching records
Select count (*) from tbl_A
Select count (*) from tbl_B

--create temp table of all records in both tables
Select * into #demo from tbl_A 
Union All
Select * from tbl_B

--Distinct #demo records = Total #demo records/2 = Total tbl_A records = total tbl_B records
Select distinct * from #demo 

You can easily write a store procedure to compare a batch of tables.

Simple variation on @erikkallen answer that shows which table the row is present in:

(   SELECT 'table1' as source, * FROM table1
    EXCEPT
    SELECT * FROM table2)  
UNION ALL
(   SELECT 'table2' as source, * FROM table2
    EXCEPT
    SELECT * FROM table1) 

If you get an error

All queries combined using a UNION, INTERSECT or EXCEPT operator must have an equal number of expressions in their target lists.

then it may help to add

(   SELECT 'table1' as source, * FROM table1
    EXCEPT
    SELECT 'table1' as source, * FROM table2)  
UNION ALL
(   SELECT 'table2' as source, * FROM table2
    EXCEPT
    SELECT 'table2' as source, * FROM table1) 
  • I get an error All queries combined using a UNION, INTERSECT or EXCEPT operator must have an equal number of expressions in their target lists. with this select. I had to add the 'table1' as source, part also to the Except-part. - I edited the answer for this. – knut Jul 4 at 11:30

There is a performance issue related with the left join as well as full join with large data.

In my opinion this is the best solution:

select [First Name], count(1) e from (select * from [Temp Test Data] union all select * from [Temp Test Data 2]) a group by [First Name] having e = 1

protected by Community Oct 16 '15 at 0:17

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality or spam answers that had to be removed, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site (the association bonus does not count).

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.