6

This question already has an answer here:

i've been making a countdown program, and i came up with this.

package main;

import java.awt.FlowLayout;
import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;
import java.awt.event.ActionListener;
import java.io.File;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.net.MalformedURLException;

import javax.sound.sampled.AudioInputStream;
import javax.sound.sampled.AudioSystem;
import javax.sound.sampled.Clip;
import javax.sound.sampled.DataLine;
import javax.sound.sampled.LineUnavailableException;
import javax.sound.sampled.UnsupportedAudioFileException;
import javax.swing.JButton;
import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JLabel;
import javax.swing.JTextField;

public class Gatoo extends JFrame implements ActionListener {
    private int sec, min, secTot, since = 999;
    private long lastTime;

    private JTextField mm = new JTextField(2), ss = new JTextField(2);
    private JLabel minLab = new JLabel("Minutes:"), secLab = new JLabel(
            "Seconds:");
    private JButton start = new JButton("Start");

    private Clip done;
    private boolean started = false;

    private static final long serialVersionUID = 4277921337939922028L;

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Gatoo cake = new Gatoo("Title");
        cake.pack();
        cake.setSize(800, 600);
        cake.setLocationRelativeTo(null);
        cake.setDefaultCloseOperation(3);
        cake.setVisible(true);
        cake.run();
    }

    public Gatoo(String s) {
        super(s);
        setLayout(new FlowLayout());

        start.addActionListener(this);

        add(minLab);
        add(mm);
        add(secLab);
        add(ss);
        add(start);
    }

    @Override
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
        started = true;
    }

    public void play(File file) throws MalformedURLException,
            UnsupportedAudioFileException, IOException,
            LineUnavailableException {
        AudioInputStream ais = AudioSystem.getAudioInputStream(new File(
                "lib/done.wav"));
        DataLine.Info info = new DataLine.Info(Clip.class, ais.getFormat());
        done = (Clip) AudioSystem.getLine(info);
        done.open(ais);
        done.start();
    }

    public void run() {
        while (true) {
            System.out.print("");// needed?
            if (started) {
                try {
                    min = Integer.parseInt(mm.getText());
                    sec = Integer.parseInt(ss.getText());
                    secTot = (min * 60) + sec;
                    lastTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
                    while (secTot > 0) {
                        since = (int) (System.currentTimeMillis() - lastTime);
                        if (since > 998) {
                            lastTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
                            secTot--;
                        }
                    }

                    play(new File("done.wav"));

                } catch (NumberFormatException exception) {
                    System.out.println("Minutes and seconds must be numbers.");
                    return;
                } catch (Exception exception) {
                    exception.printStackTrace();
                }
                started = false;
            }
        }
    }
}

In the while loop at the end the countdown code doesn't execute without a print / println statement inside. How come? The program works perfectly fine with the print statement though.

marked as duplicate by Pshemo java May 3 '15 at 8:24

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • that will print it ""(empty) – Keerthivasan Dec 26 '13 at 14:30
  • I do not believe you, to be honest. I think that your tests were false in some way. – Martijn Courteaux Dec 26 '13 at 14:31
  • 2
    Run condition. The println just delays the code so another condition (probably setting started to true) has time to be set by another thread. Revise the timeline of your operations.. – SJuan76 Dec 26 '13 at 14:31
  • @SJuan76: That was what I though as wel, but he put his code in a while true block (auch!) – Martijn Courteaux Dec 26 '13 at 14:32
  • 2
    All else aside, why not use a Swing Timer instead of trying to implement your own? – Paul Samsotha Dec 26 '13 at 14:36
12

First and foremost, your program is thread-unsafe because boolean started is a shared variable, but it is neither volatile nor accessed within synchronized blocks.

Now, accidentally, PrintStream#print is a synchronized method and, on any actual architecture, entering and exiting a synchronized block is implemented using memory barrier CPU instructions, which cause a complete synchronization between the thread-local state and main memory.

Therefore, by pure accident, adding the print call allows the setting of started flag by one thread (the EDT) to be visible by another (the main thread).

4

You have poor design for Swing application.

  1. Don't use while(true) loop in your run() method. Read more about Concurency in Swing.
  2. Call events with help of Listeners(ActionListener e.g.) instead of flags(started here).
  3. Instead of counting time use Swing Timer.

Change your run() method like next:

public void run() {
      min = Integer.parseInt(mm.getText());
      sec = Integer.parseInt(ss.getText());
      secTot = (min * 60) + sec;
      Timer timer = new Timer(1000*secTot, new ActionListener() {

        @Override
        public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
              try {
                play(new File("done.wav"));
            } catch (Exception e1) {
                e1.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    });
      timer.start();
}

actionPerformed() method :

@Override
public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
    run();
}

and remove cake.run() in main method.

  • 1
    He's actually not blocking the EDT, since he never switches to the EDT in main. – Boann Dec 26 '13 at 14:37
  • -1: He is indeed not blocking the EDT. There is just a lot of load on the main thread. – Martijn Courteaux Dec 26 '13 at 14:39
  • Yeah, now I noticed that fact. – alex2410 Dec 26 '13 at 14:41
  • setRepeats(false) – Paul Samsotha Dec 26 '13 at 14:42
  • I turned the list into an ordered list. Please check it still meets your intended meaning (that I did not stuff up). – Andrew Thompson Dec 26 '13 at 15:30
2

Look, I made a SSCCE reproducing this behavior. It is a really good question.

public class ThreadRacing implements Runnable
{
    public boolean started = false;

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        new ThreadRacing().test();
    }

    public void test()
    {
        new Thread(this).start();
        try
        {
            Thread.sleep(1000);
        } catch (Exception e)
        {

        }
        started = true;
        System.out.println("I did my job");
    }

    @Override
    public void run()
    {
        while (true)
        {
            //System.out.print("");
            if (started)
            {
                System.out.println("I started!!");
            }
        }
    }

}

This prints: "I did my job". Nothing more. Adding a volatile keyword actually fixes the problem.

To me, it looks like the second Thread gets not notified about the update to started because he is too bussy.

  • 1
    After one second, the JIT compiler will have gotten to the run method and recompiled it so that the complete if construct is eliminated as dead code. It has the right to do so because started is non-volatile and cannot be changed within the while(true) loop. So this doesn't really prove anything about threads being busy---if that was true, then making the variable volatile wouldn't make them any less busy. – Marko Topolnik Dec 26 '13 at 14:52
  • 1
    What do you mean? After one second, the JIT compiler will have gotten to the run method and recompiled it. Are you sure you looked right at my code? – Martijn Courteaux Dec 26 '13 at 14:54
  • 1
    AFAIK, there's no compilation whatsoever when the JVM is in debugging mode. Otherwise stepping through code, breakpoints, and pretty much anything else would be impossible. – Marko Topolnik Dec 26 '13 at 15:01
  • 1
    But note that in this particular example, you can set the compilation threshold to just 1 and the JIT compiler will still be allowed to optimize away the if because the whole run method involves no inter-thread operations at all (whenever the if condition evaluates to false, that is). Therefore the compiler can pretend the thread executing run is the only thread around. – Marko Topolnik Dec 26 '13 at 15:02
  • 1
    It pays to study the Java Memory Model chapter of the JLS. Even better, read the Java Memory Model paper by Jeremy Manson et al. The JLS version is imprecise at times, as it tries to be a more accessible (dumbed-down) read. – Marko Topolnik Dec 26 '13 at 15:09
-1

I would surmise that your busy-wait loop is hogging the CPU so severely it is unable to do anything. The print statement is causing just enough of a thread context switch that it is able to get other work done.

Edit: Okay, I did a little testing. I was able to reproduce OP's problem on the HotSpot Server VM. Using Thread.currentThread().setPriority(Thread.MIN_PRIORITY); did not fix it, so it is not a starvation issue. Setting the variable to volatile as @MartinCourteau, @MarkoTopolnik suggested, did fix it. That makes sense. I couldn't originally reproduce the problem on the HotSpot Client VM; apparently its optimizations are too weak for it to cache the started variable.

(Still, if the Java audio thread had a lower than normal thread priority and it were a single-CPU system, starvation was a plausible hypothesis.)

  • -1: Can you explain how this answer is actually valid if his code is in a while(true)? – Martijn Courteaux Dec 26 '13 at 14:34
  • 1
    @MartijnCourteaux That's exactly why it's valid. The while loop is starving the audio system. – Boann Dec 26 '13 at 14:38
  • You can't starve a thread that naïvely on a preemptively multitasked system. – Marko Topolnik Dec 26 '13 at 14:47

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