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So, today I tried to create a library for my in-development OS with one simple function: To print characters on screen. To use this function I simply have to push the string address to the stack and call it (The string must end with a 0x00 byte). Below is the source code of the function:

__print:                        ;Print string that is terminated with a 0x00 to screen

__print_prepare:
    pop si                  ;SI Register = String Address
    mov ah, 0x0E                ;0x0E Function = Print Character on screen
    mov bx, 0x0F                ;Background = Black, CharColor = White
    xor cx, cx              ;Counter = 0

__print_check:
    push byte [cx + si]         ;Push character to the stack
    or byte [cx + si], byte [cx + si]   ;Check if the byte equals 0x00
    jz __print_exit             ;If true then exit
    jmp __print_main            ;Else print the character

__print_main:
    pop al                  ;Store the byte in the AL Register
    int 0x10                ;Call interupt 0x10 = BIOS Interupt
    jmp __print_next            ;Continue to next character

__print_next:
    inc cx                  ;Increment CX Register by one for next character = Counter
    jmp __print_check           ;Check authenticity of character

__print_exit:
    ret

Anytime I try to assemble the source code the following nasm error appears:

def_os_lib.asm:10: error: invalid combination of opcode and operands

def_os_lib.asm:11: error: invalid combination of opcode and operands

def_os_lib.asm:16: error: invalid combination of opcode and operands

Also, in some cases, that is when I compile it in ELF format, it prompts this error:

def_os_lib.asm:10: error: impossible combination of address sizes

def_os_lib.asm:11: error: impossible combination of address sizes

The command I use for nasm(bin) is:

nasm -f bin def_os_lib.asm

The command I use for nasm(elf64) is:

nasm -f elf64 def_os_lib.asm

I've just started assembly and I know I'm doing a too big step for my knowledge. I just want to go a little bit more in depth.

Thank you all for your help. I have completed the source code by correcting the mistakes with your suggestions. Here is the new code:

__print:                        ;Print string that is terminated with a 0x00 to screen

__print_prepare:
    pop si                  ;SI Register = String Address
    xor bx, bx              ;Counter = 0

__print_check:
    push bx                 ;Save BX
    xor ax, ax              ;AX = 0
    add bx, si              ;BX = Address of the character
    mov al, byte [bx]           ;AL = Character
    pop bx                  ;Restore BX
    push ax                 ;Save character
    or ax, ax               ;Check if the byte equals 0x00
    jz __print_exit             ;If true then exit
    jmp __print_main            ;Else print the character

__print_main:
    pop ax                  ;Store the byte in the AL Register
    push bx                 ;Save BX
    mov bx, 0x0F                ;Background = Black, CharColor = White
    mov ah, 0x0E                ;0x0E Function = Print Character on screen
    int 0x10                ;Call interupt 0x10 = BIOS Interupt
    jmp __print_next            ;Continue to next character

__print_next:
    pop bx                  ;Restore BX
    inc bx                  ;Increment CX Register by one for next character = Counter
    jmp __print_check           ;Check authenticity of character

__print_exit:
    ret
2

You can only use [BX or BP] in combination with [SI or DI]; AX, DX or CX are not allowed.

You can't PUSH/POP a byte so POP AL so any byte-size argument will be deemed invalid.

  • Do you mean that the byte statement isn't needed in the push? – user3136933 Dec 26 '13 at 23:08
  • The byte directive specifies that the size of the argument is byte. You can't PUSH/POP a byte. – Magoo Dec 27 '13 at 0:38
  • Magoo, actually you can push al, only assemblers don't let you do it. It was removed "recently" from gas and probably from nasm since that's not a good idea as you explain. – Alexis Wilke Dec 27 '13 at 10:12
  • @AlexisWilke Um, no - byte push/pop is't supported by x86 architecture. Assemblers may have not objected, and implemented word instructions when a byte was specified, but that is a bug in the assembler - even if it was exploited. Now you could implement a push-byte as a macro, but it would need to be dec sp mov [sp+1],al or whatever or possibly mov [sp],al dec sp but it certainly wouldn't be efficient. I believe you'll find that what was actually implemented was push ax if push al was coded. If you have an old version, I'd be interested to see what byte code push al was assembled to. – Magoo Dec 27 '13 at 12:27
  • It would be like this actually: dec sp mov [sp],al -- and you are actually correct, the minimum size you can push on the stack is a word. However, it is correct that it is not safe to use any value that is not at least 32 bit on a x86 and 64 bit on an amd64... stack alignment is generally checked these days. – Alexis Wilke Dec 28 '13 at 3:49
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push byte [cx + si]

cx cannot be used in adressing under real mode.

or byte [cx + si], byte [cx + si]

You can not have two memory operands in one instruction normally in x86. You need to use a register as middleman.

  • So I need to mov those values to another register and then use the or on itself... – user3136933 Dec 26 '13 at 23:04
  • You only need to copy one of the values. – Jens Björnhager Dec 27 '13 at 1:21

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