6

I've been trying this for a while and I don't seem to find a solution.
HTML:

<table>
    <tr>
        <td>
            <div>this div has to expand over the td padding</div>
        </td>
    </tr>
</table>

CSS:

table {
    height:100%;
}

td {
    height:100%;
    background: green;
    padding:5px;
}

div {
    min-width:100%;
    height:100%;
    background:yellow;
    float:left;
    white-space:nowrap;
}

I want the div to expand exactly as much as the td but to also expand over the td padding.

Moving the padding to the div element is not a solution since the div has to be 100% height and at least 100% width, the rest of the div's width is overflow:hidden and appears on hover but I try to keep the example as simple as possible so I didn't include that here.

Edit:

@codehorse I've tried your approach but now it appears that the div expands on the whole body so I guess Era is right, relative positioning might not work on td. I could use another wrapper between the td and div but I would like to avoid that if possible. I'm looking for a standard solution on this.

@Era Works perfect Thank you!

9

Although this is not the right way to do this but if it works for you then use this CSS for div:

 div {
    margin: -5px;
    padding: 5px;
    position: relative;
    }
  • 1
    I'm not sure relative positioning is needed, seems to work fine without it as well – ntt Dec 27 '13 at 7:04
  • Yes it will. :) – richa_pandey Dec 27 '13 at 7:05
  • @Era I would give you 10 upvotes if I could! This has solved my problem of displaying a dropdown nav menu directly below it's containing <header>, regardless of it's responsive height. Why is it "not the right way" though? I have heard that using negative margins is generally frowned upon, but never understood why! – Kenny83 Apr 21 '18 at 18:38
2
div {
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;
    right: 0;
    bottom: 0;
}

td {
    position: relative;
}
  • why top: 0; left: 0; right: 0; bottom: 0; ? And I did'nt downvote you ans – Dipak Ingole Dec 27 '13 at 5:51
  • so it expands the whole td like the OP wants.. – CRABOLO Dec 27 '13 at 5:52
  • would like to see working in fiddle..can you please do it for me? – Dipak Ingole Dec 27 '13 at 5:54
  • as far as my knowledge TD cannot be positioned as "relative" . – richa_pandey Dec 27 '13 at 5:56
2

If your table structure is not too complex,i'll suggest you use display:table to achieve your purpose.....this way, you'll avoid position attributes, which otherwise conflict with layout sometimes making a big mess of things.

Also, html table is not suggested these days, since you have css tables!!

here is a demo

HTML

<div class="table">
    <div class="td">
        <div class="inner">this div has to expand over the td padding</div>
    </div>
</div>

CSS

.table {
    height:100%;
    display:table;
}
.td {
    height:100%;
    background: green;
    padding:5px;
    display:table-cell;
}
div.inner {
    min-width:100%;
    margin:-2px; /* change this to suit your need */
    background:yellow;
    float:left;
    white-space:nowrap;
}
  • The table structure is pretty complex actually, I know using tables is not recommended but last time I checked (awhile ago) tables can be used if you need to represent an actual table and you're not forcing it into full design layouts. Please let me know if things have changed and I missed something. Thank you! – ntt Dec 27 '13 at 6:31
  • Also I've noticed this for some time, when emulating tables in divs, people seem to ignore the tr element and place the fake td directly into the fake table element. Is this a good aproach? – ntt Dec 27 '13 at 6:35
  • 1
    see...its'all about achieving the layout design...as for the good approach u asked....it not a recommended approach.Also,display:table is suggested these days coz ever since google started supporting mobile-first concept, html table has been degrading since and css tables are preferred for their flexibility in design (and IE8+ support)....hope this much helps you understand things!! :) – NoobEditor Dec 27 '13 at 6:58
  • Got it, this is indeed a good reason to avoid old school tables in the future. – ntt Dec 27 '13 at 7:12

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