136

I am trying to find the index of all the instances of an element, say, "Nano", in a JavaScript array.

var Cars = ["Nano", "Volvo", "BMW", "Nano", "VW", "Nano"];

I tried jQuery.inArray, or similarly, .indexOf(), but it only gave the index of the last instance of the element, i.e. 5 in this case.

How do I get it for all instances?

15 Answers 15

133

The .indexOf() method has an optional second parameter that specifies the index to start searching from, so you can call it in a loop to find all instances of a particular value:

function getAllIndexes(arr, val) {
    var indexes = [], i = -1;
    while ((i = arr.indexOf(val, i+1)) != -1){
        indexes.push(i);
    }
    return indexes;
}

var indexes = getAllIndexes(Cars, "Nano");

You don't really make it clear how you want to use the indexes, so my function returns them as an array (or returns an empty array if the value isn't found), but you could do something else with the individual index values inside the loop.

UPDATE: As per VisioN's comment, a simple for loop would get the same job done more efficiently, and it is easier to understand and therefore easier to maintain:

function getAllIndexes(arr, val) {
    var indexes = [], i;
    for(i = 0; i < arr.length; i++)
        if (arr[i] === val)
            indexes.push(i);
    return indexes;
}
14
  • 1
    It doesn't seem to be the faster alternative to a single for loop with index array populating.
    – VisioN
    Dec 27 '13 at 10:04
  • 1
    @VisioN - Yes, a plain for loop iterating over the array would be simpler too, but since the OP mentioned trying to use .indexOf() I wanted to show that it can do the job. (I guess I figured the OP could figure out how to do it with a for loop.) Of course there are other ways to do it, e.g., Cars.reduce(function(a, v, i) { if (v==="Nano") a.push(i); return a; }, []);
    – nnnnnn
    Dec 27 '13 at 10:07
  • I can tell you're from North America because you used indexes instead of indices :P
    – 4castle
    Apr 14 '16 at 21:22
  • 2
    @4castle - Ha. No, I'm not. "Indices" and "indexes" are both correct, and I tend to alternate between the two. I hadn't ever thought of that as a regional dialect thing. Interesting.
    – nnnnnn
    Apr 14 '16 at 22:31
  • 1
    @IgorFomenko - Thanks for the suggestion. It's not really a "calculation", it's just a property lookup, but still actually I do often code loops as per your suggestion, but I don't usually do it in StackOverflow answers if it's not directly relevant to the question. How sure are you that the JS compiler won't do that optimisation automatically behind the scenes?
    – nnnnnn
    Aug 20 '20 at 9:43
106

Another alternative solution is to use Array.prototype.reduce():

["Nano","Volvo","BMW","Nano","VW","Nano"].reduce(function(a, e, i) {
    if (e === 'Nano')
        a.push(i);
    return a;
}, []);   // [0, 3, 5]

N.B.: Check the browser compatibility for reduce method and use polyfill if required.

6
  • 2
    +1. Funny coincidence: I just edited my reply to your comment under my answer to suggest exactly this solution, then I refresh and see you'd already coded the same thing with only one variable name different.
    – nnnnnn
    Dec 27 '13 at 10:15
  • @nnnnnn :) Yeah, I thought maybe reduce could be a nice alternative.
    – VisioN
    Dec 27 '13 at 10:16
  • 29
    array.reduce((a, e, i) => (e === value) ? a.concat(i) : a, [])
    – yckart
    Dec 21 '16 at 20:46
  • 3
    I googled contat is slower than push, therefore I stick with the answer. Sep 19 '19 at 8:16
  • Yes, please don't use concat here--you're allocating a whole new array object on every callback and tossing the previous object into the garbage collector without any commensurate benefit in readability.
    – ggorlen
    Oct 2 '20 at 17:17
68

Another approach using Array.prototype.map() and Array.prototype.filter():

var indices = array.map((e, i) => e === value ? i : '').filter(String)
6
  • 4
    great, it works. can you explain what is the role of the filter(String) Jan 3 '18 at 19:40
  • 3
    @Muthu map(…) checks on each iteration for the equality of e and value. When they match the index is returned, otherwise an empty string. To get rid of those falsy values, filter(String) makes sure that the result only contains values that are type of string and NOT empty. filter(String) could also be written as: filter(e => e !== '')
    – yckart
    Jan 6 '18 at 19:13
  • 3
    ...or: String(thing) coerces anything to a string. Array#filter returns an array of all the values for which the condition is truthy. Because empty strings are falsy, those are NOT included in the array.
    – yckart
    Jan 6 '18 at 19:13
  • Thank you for your explanation, it's really helpful for me Jan 7 '18 at 17:32
  • 2
    I would be confused if I saw this in a project. It reads like "Filter to strings", meaning only keep if it's a string. And then the resulting array would be indexes as strings, not numbers. Jul 14 '19 at 4:08
23

You can write a simple readable solution to this by using both map and filter:

const nanoIndexes = Cars
  .map((car, i) => car === 'Nano' ? i : -1)
  .filter(index => index !== -1);

EDIT: If you don't need to support IE/Edge (or are transpiling your code), ES2019 gave us flatMap, which lets you do this in a simple one-liner:

const nanoIndexes = Cars.flatMap((car, i) => car === 'Nano' ? i : []);
0
21

More simple way with es6 style.

const indexOfAll = (arr, val) => arr.reduce((acc, el, i) => (el === val ? [...acc, i] : acc), []);


//Examples:
var cars = ["Nano", "Volvo", "BMW", "Nano", "VW", "Nano"];
indexOfAll(cars, "Nano"); //[0, 3, 5]
indexOfAll([1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3], 1); // [0,3]
indexOfAll([1, 2, 3], 4); // []
9

I just want to update with another easy method.

You can also use forEach method.

var Cars = ["Nano", "Volvo", "BMW", "Nano", "VW", "Nano"];

var result = [];

Cars.forEach((car, index) => car === 'Nano' ? result.push(index) : null)
6

Note: MDN gives a method using a while loop:

var indices = [];
var array = ['a', 'b', 'a', 'c', 'a', 'd'];
var element = 'a';
var idx = array.indexOf(element);
while (idx != -1) {
  indices.push(idx);
  idx = array.indexOf(element, idx + 1);
}

I wouldn't say it's any better than other answers. Just interesting.

4
const indexes = cars
    .map((car, i) => car === "Nano" ? i : null)
    .filter(i => i !== null)
3
  • 1
    Indexes are zero-based, so this will fail if the first car is a Nano. Jul 10 '19 at 14:07
  • 1
    Oh look, you have a solution and mine looks like just like it. I should have seen yours before I spent time writing mine. There were just so many sprawling for loops I thought, "I could make my own answer in 2 seconds." Jul 14 '19 at 4:04
  • Yeah. These are mostly way over-complicated. Nice correction. Jul 15 '19 at 12:01
2

This worked for me:

let array1 = [5, 12, 8, 130, 44, 12, 45, 12, 56];
let numToFind = 12
let indexesOf12 = [] // the number whose occurrence in the array we want to find

array1.forEach(function(elem, index, array) {
    if (elem === numToFind) {indexesOf12.push(index)}
    return indexesOf12
})

console.log(indexesOf12) // outputs [1, 5, 7]
1

Just to share another method, you can use Function Generators to achieve the result as well:

function findAllIndexOf(target, needle) {
  return [].concat(...(function*(){
    for (var i = 0; i < target.length; i++) if (target[i] === needle) yield [i];
  })());
}

var target = "hellooooo";
var target2 = ['w','o',1,3,'l','o'];

console.log(findAllIndexOf(target, 'o'));
console.log(findAllIndexOf(target2, 'o'));

1
["a", "b", "a", "b"]
   .map((val, index) => ({ val, index }))
   .filter(({val, index}) => val === "a")
   .map(({val, index}) => index)

=> [0, 2]
1
  • Please write an essential explanation or inline comments for the code. BTW, your solution did work but it contains 3 iterations...
    – JustWe
    Nov 22 '19 at 0:43
1

You can use Polyfill

if (!Array.prototype.filterIndex) {
Array.prototype.filterIndex = function (func, thisArg) {

    'use strict';
    if (!((typeof func === 'Function' || typeof func === 'function') && this))
        throw new TypeError();

    let len = this.length >>> 0,
        res = new Array(len), // preallocate array
        t = this, c = 0, i = -1;

    let kValue;
    if (thisArg === undefined) {
        while (++i !== len) {
            // checks to see if the key was set
            if (i in this) {
                kValue = t[i]; // in case t is changed in callback
                if (func(t[i], i, t)) {
                    res[c++] = i;
                }
            }
        }
    }
    else {
        while (++i !== len) {
            // checks to see if the key was set
            if (i in this) {
                kValue = t[i];
                if (func.call(thisArg, t[i], i, t)) {
                    res[c++] = i;
                }
            }
        }
    }

    res.length = c; // shrink down array to proper size
    return res;
};

}

Use it like this:

[2,23,1,2,3,4,52,2].filterIndex(element => element === 2)

result: [0, 3, 7]
0

findIndex retrieves only the first index which matches callback output. You can implement your own findIndexes by extending Array , then casting your arrays to the new structure .

class EnhancedArray extends Array {
  findIndexes(where) {
    return this.reduce((a, e, i) => (where(e, i) ? a.concat(i) : a), []);
  }
}
   /*----Working with simple data structure (array of numbers) ---*/

//existing array
let myArray = [1, 3, 5, 5, 4, 5];

//cast it :
myArray = new EnhancedArray(...myArray);

//run
console.log(
   myArray.findIndexes((e) => e===5)
)
/*----Working with Array of complex items structure-*/

let arr = [{name: 'Ahmed'}, {name: 'Rami'}, {name: 'Abdennour'}];

arr= new EnhancedArray(...arr);


console.log(
  arr.findIndexes((o) => o.name.startsWith('A'))
)

0

We can use Stack and push "i" into the stack every time we encounter the condition "arr[i]==value"

Check this:

static void getindex(int arr[], int value)
{
    Stack<Integer>st= new Stack<Integer>();
    int n= arr.length;
    for(int i=n-1; i>=0 ;i--)
    {
        if(arr[i]==value)
        {
            st.push(i);
        }
    }   
    while(!st.isEmpty())
    {
        System.out.println(st.peek()+" ");
        st.pop(); 
    }
}
1
  • 2
    The question is tagged with javascript, whilst your answer is Java I believe?
    – noggin182
    May 30 '19 at 11:09
0

When both parameter passed as array


    function getIndexes(arr, val) {
        var indexes = [], i;
        for(i = 0; i < arr.length; i++){
    for(j =0; j< val.length; j++) {
     if (arr[i] === val[j])
                indexes.push(i);
    }
    }    
        return indexes;
    }

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