My test requires that I set the Response property on an immutable Rsvp object (see below) to a specific value.

public class Rsvp
{
    public string Response { get; private set; }

    public Rsvp(string response)
    {
        Response = response;
    }
}

I initially tried to do this using Build<Rsvp>().With(x => x.Rsvp, "Attending"), but realized this only supports writable properties.

I replaced that with Build<Rsvp>().FromFactory(new Rsvp("Attending")). This works, but is cumbersome for more complex objects where it doesn't matter what some of the properties are.

For instance, if the Rsvp object had a CreatedDate property, this method of instantiating the object would force me to write Build<Rsvp>().FromFactory(new Rsvp("Attending", fixture.Create<DateTime>())).

Is there a way to only specify values for meaning properties for an immutable object?

up vote 8 down vote accepted

AutoFixture was originally build as a tool for Test-Driven Development (TDD), and TDD is all about feedback. In the spirit of GOOS, you should listen to your tests. If the tests are hard to write, you should consider your API design. AutoFixture tends to amplify that sort of feedback.

Frankly, immutable types are a pain in C#, but you can make it easier to work with a class like Rsvp if you take a cue from F# and introduce copy and update semantics. If you modify Rsvp like this, it's going to be much easier to work with overall, and thus, as a by-product, also to unit test:

public class Rsvp
{
    public string Response { get; private set; }

    public DateTime CreatedDate { get; private set; }

    public Rsvp(string response, DateTime createdDate)
    {
        Response = response;
        CreatedDate = createdDate;
    }

    public Rsvp WithResponse(string newResponse)
    {
        return new Rsvp(newResponse, this.CreatedDate);
    }

    public Rsvp WithCreatedDate(DateTime newCreatedDate)
    {
        return new Rsvp(this.Response, newCreatedDate);
    }
}

Notice that I've add two WithXyz methods, that return a new instance with that one value changed, but all other values held constant.

This would enable you to create an instance of Rsvp for testing purposed like this:

var fixture = new Fixture();
var seed = fixture.Create<Rsvp>();
var sut = seed.WithResponse("Attending");

or, as a one-liner:

var sut = new Fixture().Create<Rsvp>().WithResponse("Attending");

If you can't change Rsvp, you can add the WithXyz methods as extension methods.

Once you've done this about a dozen times, you get tired of it, and it's time to make the move to F#, where all that (and more) is built-in:

type Rsvp = {
    Response : string
    CreatedDate : DateTime }

You can create an Rsvp record with AutoFixture like this:

let fixture = Fixture()
let seed = fixture.Create<Rsvp>()
let sut = { seed with Response = "Attending" }

or, as a one-liner:

let sut = { Fixture().Create<Rsvp>() with Response = "Attending" }
  • 2
    +1 If @mattslav can modify the Rsvp class (or add the extension methods) then this should be the accepted answer. – Nikos Baxevanis Dec 29 '13 at 12:26
  • 4
    The first paragraph of this answer is so well written that we could actually include it in description at AutoFixture's README file. – Nikos Baxevanis Dec 29 '13 at 12:28
  • With records in F# you loose the ability to define invariants on the properties. You might want to limit the shape of a string property to a subset of all strings. This is where classes shine. – fsl Dec 30 '13 at 9:26
  • 1
    I wouldn't say the tests are hard to write. I wasn't sure the best way to implement the Object Builder pattern using AutoFixture as the engine for creating objects. Using extension methods that are only available to tests seems to be the best option, as this is something that only tests need to be able to do. – Matt Slavicek Dec 30 '13 at 13:27
  • @mattslav Sure you can add it as test-only code, but IME, it's a valuable feature to have in production code too. The benefit of TDD is that it gives you feedback about the production API of your code. – Mark Seemann Dec 30 '13 at 14:50

As long as the Response property is readonly*, you can define a custom SpecimenBuilder for the Rsvp type:

internal class RsvpBuilder : ISpecimenBuilder
{
    public object Create(object request, ISpecimenContext context)
    {
        var pi = request as ParameterInfo;
        if (pi == null)
            return new NoSpecimen();

        if (pi.ParameterType != typeof(string) || pi.Name != "response")
            return new NoSpecimen();

        return "Attending";
    }
}

The following test passes:

[Fact]
public void ResponseIsCorrect()
{
    var fixture = new Fixture();
    fixture.Customizations.Add(new RsvpBuilder());
    var sut = fixture.Create<Rsvp>();

    var actual = sut.Response;

    Assert.Equal("Attending", actual);
}

* If for some reason the Response property becomes writable you can follow the solution in this answer.

  • I was hoping for a solution that didn't require an object builder to be created for every object. Additionally, the test would need to pass the Response value to the RsvpBuilder, how would it do that? – Matt Slavicek Dec 28 '13 at 13:40
  • 1
    @mattslav Is is possible as Mark Seemann answered. – Nikos Baxevanis Dec 29 '13 at 12:32

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