230

Is there a default/official/recommended way to parse CSV files in C#? I don't want to roll my own parser.

Also, I've seen instances of people using ODBC/OLE DB to read CSV via the Text driver, and a lot of people discourage this due to its "drawbacks." What are these drawbacks?

Ideally, I'm looking for a way through which I can read the CSV by column name, using the first record as the header / field names. Some of the answers given are correct but work to basically deserialize the file into classes.

16 Answers 16

124

Let a library handle all the nitty-gritty details for you! :-)

Check out FileHelpers and stay DRY - Don't Repeat Yourself - no need to re-invent the wheel a gazillionth time....

You basically just need to define that shape of your data - the fields in your individual line in the CSV - by means of a public class (and so well-thought out attributes like default values, replacements for NULL values and so forth), point the FileHelpers engine at a file, and bingo - you get back all the entries from that file. One simple operation - great performance!

  • 1
    until you need sth really custom (and most of that can be implemented as extensions anyway) FileHelpers is by far the best way to go, really convenient, tested and well performing solution – mikus Aug 12 '13 at 13:39
  • 3
    As of 1st June 2015, the only way I could download FileHelpers was to search for it on sourceforge.net. Here's the link used: sourceforge.net/projects/filehelpers/?source=directory – Sudhanshu Mishra Jun 1 '15 at 5:35
  • 2
    @dotnetguy we are in the way to release 3.1 (currently 3.1-rc2) is out. Also we redesigned the site: www.filehelpers.net you can download latest version from there – MarcosMeli Jul 22 '15 at 23:24
  • 1
    @MarcosMeli many thanks! I already used FileHelpers in one of my projects and it was a breeze to use - kudos to the team. I'm planning a blog on it soon and btw - Love the new site - well done! – Sudhanshu Mishra Jul 22 '15 at 23:52
  • This library works like a charm, I'm glad you guys mentioned it otherwise I would be wasting 3 hours making my own library. – NET Developer Aug 1 '15 at 23:25
312
+100

A CSV parser is now a part of .NET Framework.

Add a reference to Microsoft.VisualBasic.dll (works fine in C#, don't mind the name)

using (TextFieldParser parser = new TextFieldParser(@"c:\temp\test.csv"))
{
    parser.TextFieldType = FieldType.Delimited;
    parser.SetDelimiters(",");
    while (!parser.EndOfData)
    {
        //Process row
        string[] fields = parser.ReadFields();
        foreach (string field in fields)
        {
            //TODO: Process field
        }
    }
}

The docs are here - TextFieldParser Class

P.S. If you need a CSV exporter, try CsvExport (discl: I'm one of the contributors)

  • 2
    From my experience TextFieldParser does not perform well with large (e.g > 250Mb) files. :( – MBoros Mar 20 '14 at 12:09
  • 12
    +1 This is a great solution as it means I don't have to download any other open source CSV parser! – Ben Smith Apr 11 '14 at 10:34
  • 1
    Good solution this. We used the TextFieldParser to read 540 csv files's headers in under 2 seconds. – TheLegendaryCopyCoder Jul 8 '14 at 12:54
  • 5
    TextFieldParser implements IDisposable, so might be best to use it in a using clause. Good answer otherwise. – Chris Bush Dec 3 '15 at 18:54
  • 3
    In the constructor you might want to use a different encoding than the one by default, like so: new TextFieldParser("c:\temp\test.csv", System.Text.Encoding.UTF8) – neural5torm Apr 19 '16 at 17:41
167

CsvHelper (a library I maintain) will read a CSV file into custom objects.

var csv = new CsvReader( File.OpenText( "file.csv" ) );
var myCustomObjects = csv.GetRecords<MyCustomObject>();

Sometimes you don't own the objects you're trying to read into. In this case, you can use fluent mapping because you can't put attributes on the class.

public sealed class MyCustomObjectMap : CsvClassMap<MyCustomObject>
{
    public MyCustomObjectMap()
    {
        Map( m => m.Property1 ).Name( "Column Name" );
        Map( m => m.Property2 ).Index( 4 );
        Map( m => m.Property3 ).Ignore();
        Map( m => m.Property4 ).TypeConverter<MySpecialTypeConverter>();
    }
}
  • 3
    Great library! Works like a charm. – kubal5003 Feb 8 '12 at 14:48
  • 15
    I agree with @kubal5003. What sold me on it was you have it available as a NuGet package. Thanks man, it is fast, and does all the csv reading I need. – Gromer Sep 7 '12 at 15:10
  • 5
    It's damn fast. 1.3 million records read and deserialized in 10 seconds. – marisks Jan 16 '13 at 14:50
  • 1
    I found this library a few days ago and am very impressed. – ProfK Apr 6 '13 at 13:58
  • 2
    Great library very easy to implement. I would just suggest to Josh to update his answer here because the library has changed a bit since this answer was written and you cannot instantiate CsvHelper anymore (it's only a namespace now) but you have to use the CsvReader class. – Marko Aug 5 '13 at 20:04
31

In a business application, i use the Open Source project on codeproject.com, CSVReader.

It works well, and has good performance. There is some benchmarking on the link i provided.

A simple example, copied from the project page:

using (CsvReader csv = new CsvReader(new StreamReader("data.csv"), true))
{
    int fieldCount = csv.FieldCount;
    string[] headers = csv.GetFieldHeaders();

    while (csv.ReadNextRecord())
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < fieldCount; i++)
            Console.Write(string.Format("{0} = {1};", headers[i], csv[i]));

        Console.WriteLine();
    }
}

As you can see, it's very easy to work with.

17

I know its a bit late but just found a library Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO which has TextFieldParser class to process csv files.

12

If you need only reading csv files then I recommend this library: A Fast CSV Reader
If you also need to generate csv files then use this one: FileHelpers

Both of them are free and opensource.

  • This one, thankfully, has dynamic support. +1 – nuzzolilo Sep 17 '12 at 19:45
  • FileHelpers has an appealing summary: filehelpers.com The FileHelpers are a free and easy to use .NET library to import/export data from fixed length or delimited records in files, strings or streams. – AnneTheAgile Oct 6 '12 at 0:19
  • While this link may answer the question, link only answers are discouraged on Stack Overflow, you can improve this answer by taking vital parts of the link and putting it into your answer, this makes sure your answer is still an answer if the link gets changed or removed :) – WhatsThePoint Oct 24 '18 at 7:23
10

Here is a helper class I use often, in case any one ever comes back to this thread (I wanted to share it).

I use this for the simplicity of porting it into projects ready to use:

public class CSVHelper : List<string[]>
{
  protected string csv = string.Empty;
  protected string separator = ",";

  public CSVHelper(string csv, string separator = "\",\"")
  {
    this.csv = csv;
    this.separator = separator;

    foreach (string line in Regex.Split(csv, System.Environment.NewLine).ToList().Where(s => !string.IsNullOrEmpty(s)))
    {
      string[] values = Regex.Split(line, separator);

      for (int i = 0; i < values.Length; i++)
      {
        //Trim values
        values[i] = values[i].Trim('\"');
      }

      this.Add(values);
    }
  }
}

And use it like:

public List<Person> GetPeople(string csvContent)
{
  List<Person> people = new List<Person>();
  CSVHelper csv = new CSVHelper(csvContent);
  foreach(string[] line in csv)
  {
    Person person = new Person();
    person.Name = line[0];
    person.TelephoneNo = line[1];
    people.Add(person);
  }
  return people;
}

[Updated csv helper: bug fixed where the last new line character created a new line]

  • 17
    if any of the csv entries contains comma (,) this code will not work. – hakan Jun 12 '12 at 14:32
  • To keep things lightweight, I used a pipe character as the seperator. '|' – Base33 Jun 12 '12 at 16:45
  • excellent solution. Just a question about the 2nd snippet. What type of object is Person – Cocoa Dev Jan 23 '13 at 14:34
  • @CocoaDev It is an class that contains two string properties - Name and TelephoneNo. Purely for the example though. If any of the properties was an integer it should be just a straight forward conversion (with check?). – Base33 Jan 23 '13 at 16:59
8

This solution is using the official Microsoft.VisualBasic assembly to parse CSV.

Advantages:

  • delimiter escaping
  • ignores Header
  • trim spaces
  • ignore comments

Code:

    using Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO;

    public static List<List<string>> ParseCSV (string csv)
    {
        List<List<string>> result = new List<List<string>>();


        // To use the TextFieldParser a reference to the Microsoft.VisualBasic assembly has to be added to the project. 
        using (TextFieldParser parser = new TextFieldParser(new StringReader(csv))) 
        {
            parser.CommentTokens = new string[] { "#" };
            parser.SetDelimiters(new string[] { ";" });
            parser.HasFieldsEnclosedInQuotes = true;

            // Skip over header line.
            //parser.ReadLine();

            while (!parser.EndOfData)
            {
                var values = new List<string>();

                var readFields = parser.ReadFields();
                if (readFields != null)
                    values.AddRange(readFields);
                result.Add(values);
            }
        }

        return result;
    }
7

I have written TinyCsvParser for .NET, which is one of the fastest .NET parsers around and highly configurable to parse almost any CSV format.

It is released under MIT License:

You can use NuGet to install it. Run the following command in the Package Manager Console.

PM> Install-Package TinyCsvParser

Usage

Imagine we have list of Persons in a CSV file persons.csv with their first name, last name and birthdate.

FirstName;LastName;BirthDate
Philipp;Wagner;1986/05/12
Max;Musterman;2014/01/02

The corresponding domain model in our system might look like this.

private class Person
{
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
    public string LastName { get; set; }
    public DateTime BirthDate { get; set; }
}

When using TinyCsvParser you have to define the mapping between the columns in the CSV data and the property in you domain model.

private class CsvPersonMapping : CsvMapping<Person>
{

    public CsvPersonMapping()
        : base()
    {
        MapProperty(0, x => x.FirstName);
        MapProperty(1, x => x.LastName);
        MapProperty(2, x => x.BirthDate);
    }
}

And then we can use the mapping to parse the CSV data with a CsvParser.

namespace TinyCsvParser.Test
{
    [TestFixture]
    public class TinyCsvParserTest
    {
        [Test]
        public void TinyCsvTest()
        {
            CsvParserOptions csvParserOptions = new CsvParserOptions(true, new[] { ';' });
            CsvPersonMapping csvMapper = new CsvPersonMapping();
            CsvParser<Person> csvParser = new CsvParser<Person>(csvParserOptions, csvMapper);

            var result = csvParser
                .ReadFromFile(@"persons.csv", Encoding.ASCII)
                .ToList();

            Assert.AreEqual(2, result.Count);

            Assert.IsTrue(result.All(x => x.IsValid));

            Assert.AreEqual("Philipp", result[0].Result.FirstName);
            Assert.AreEqual("Wagner", result[0].Result.LastName);

            Assert.AreEqual(1986, result[0].Result.BirthDate.Year);
            Assert.AreEqual(5, result[0].Result.BirthDate.Month);
            Assert.AreEqual(12, result[0].Result.BirthDate.Day);

            Assert.AreEqual("Max", result[1].Result.FirstName);
            Assert.AreEqual("Mustermann", result[1].Result.LastName);

            Assert.AreEqual(2014, result[1].Result.BirthDate.Year);
            Assert.AreEqual(1, result[1].Result.BirthDate.Month);
            Assert.AreEqual(1, result[1].Result.BirthDate.Day);
        }
    }
}

User Guide

A full User Guide is available at:

3

There's no official way I know of, but you should indeed use existing libraries. Here is one I found really useful from CodeProject:

http://www.codeproject.com/KB/database/CsvReader.aspx

  • While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. - From Review – WhatsThePoint Oct 24 '18 at 7:25
  • @WhatsThePoint I agree for code snippets, but what if you link to a library? – VitalyB Oct 24 '18 at 19:45
1

Here is my KISS implementation...

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;

class CsvParser
{
    public static List<string> Parse(string line)
    {
        const char escapeChar = '"';
        const char splitChar = ',';
        bool inEscape = false;
        bool priorEscape = false;

        List<string> result = new List<string>();
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        for (int i = 0; i < line.Length; i++)
        {
            char c = line[i];
            switch (c)
            {
                case escapeChar:
                    if (!inEscape)
                        inEscape = true;
                    else
                    {
                        if (!priorEscape)
                        {
                            if (i + 1 < line.Length && line[i + 1] == escapeChar)
                                priorEscape = true;
                            else
                                inEscape = false;
                        }
                        else
                        {
                            sb.Append(c);
                            priorEscape = false;
                        }
                    }
                    break;
                case splitChar:
                    if (inEscape) //if in escape
                        sb.Append(c);
                    else
                    {
                        result.Add(sb.ToString());
                        sb.Length = 0;
                    }
                    break;
                default:
                    sb.Append(c);
                    break;
            }
        }

        if (sb.Length > 0)
            result.Add(sb.ToString());

        return result;
    }

}
  • This does not deal with line breaks within quoted strings which is valid in a CSV file. – John Leidegren Jan 20 '18 at 13:50
  • Alex, what John is trying to say is that RFC 4180 (ietf.org/rfc/rfc4180.txt -- See section 2 and item 6) allows for a column to have a CR LF in the middle of a column effectively spreading it over 2 lines in a file. Your solution will probably work well in most cases (especially if the CSV files was created by saving out of Excel), but it doesn't cover this edge case. CsvHelper, mentioned above, is supposed to take this case into consideration. – David Yates Jan 25 '18 at 20:35
  • Yes, this is true, but if you have CR LF in your CSV, chances you should probably not be using CSV, but something more appropriate like, json, or xml, or fixed length format. – Alex Begun Mar 8 '18 at 5:53
1

Some time ago I had wrote simple class for CSV read/write based on Microsoft.VisualBasic library. Using this simple class you will be able to work with CSV like with 2 dimensions array. You can find my class by the following link: https://github.com/ukushu/DataExporter

Simple example of usage:

Csv csv = new Csv("\t");//delimiter symbol

csv.FileOpen("c:\\file1.csv");

var row1Cell6Value = csv.Rows[0][5];

csv.AddRow("asdf","asdffffff","5")

csv.FileSave("c:\\file2.csv");

For reading header only you need is to read csv.Rows[0] cells :)

1

Single source file solution for straightforward parsing needs, useful. Deals with all the nasty edge cases. Such as new line normalization and handling new lines in quoted string literals. Your welcome!

If you CSV file has a header you just read out the column names (and compute column indexes) from the first row. Simple as that.

Note that Dump is a LINQPad method, you might want to remove that if you are not using LINQPad.

void Main()
{
    var file1 = "a,b,c\r\nx,y,z";
    CSV.ParseText(file1).Dump();

    var file2 = "a,\"b\",c\r\nx,\"y,z\"";
    CSV.ParseText(file2).Dump();

    var file3 = "a,\"b\",c\r\nx,\"y\r\nz\"";
    CSV.ParseText(file3).Dump();

    var file4 = "\"\"\"\"";
    CSV.ParseText(file4).Dump();
}

static class CSV
{
    public struct Record
    {
        public readonly string[] Row;

        public string this[int index] => Row[index];

        public Record(string[] row)
        {
            Row = row;
        }
    }

    public static List<Record> ParseText(string text)
    {
        return Parse(new StringReader(text));
    }

    public static List<Record> ParseFile(string fn)
    {
        using (var reader = File.OpenText(fn))
        {
            return Parse(reader);
        }
    }

    public static List<Record> Parse(TextReader reader)
    {
        var data = new List<Record>();

        var col = new StringBuilder();
        var row = new List<string>();
        for (; ; )
        {
            var ln = reader.ReadLine();
            if (ln == null) break;
            if (Tokenize(ln, col, row))
            {
                data.Add(new Record(row.ToArray()));
                row.Clear();
            }
        }

        return data;
    }

    public static bool Tokenize(string s, StringBuilder col, List<string> row)
    {
        int i = 0;

        if (col.Length > 0)
        {
            col.AppendLine(); // continuation

            if (!TokenizeQuote(s, ref i, col, row))
            {
                return false;
            }
        }

        while (i < s.Length)
        {
            var ch = s[i];
            if (ch == ',')
            {
                row.Add(col.ToString().Trim());
                col.Length = 0;
                i++;
            }
            else if (ch == '"')
            {
                i++;
                if (!TokenizeQuote(s, ref i, col, row))
                {
                    return false;
                }
            }
            else
            {
                col.Append(ch);
                i++;
            }
        }

        if (col.Length > 0)
        {
            row.Add(col.ToString().Trim());
            col.Length = 0;
        }

        return true;
    }

    public static bool TokenizeQuote(string s, ref int i, StringBuilder col, List<string> row)
    {
        while (i < s.Length)
        {
            var ch = s[i];
            if (ch == '"')
            {
                // escape sequence
                if (i + 1 < s.Length && s[i + 1] == '"')
                {
                    col.Append('"');
                    i++;
                    i++;
                    continue;
                }
                i++;
                return true;
            }
            else
            {
                col.Append(ch);
                i++;
            }
        }
        return false;
    }
}
0

Based on unlimit's post on How to properly split a CSV using C# split() function? :

string[] tokens = System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex.Split(paramString, ",");

NOTE: this doesn't handle escaped / nested commas, etc., and therefore is only suitable for certain simple CSV lists.

  • 1
    This is very bad and likely slow :) – EKS Sep 20 '16 at 14:07
  • Probably, but it works perfectly and simply for a small set of parameters, therefore is a valid and helpful solution. Why downvote it? "Very Bad" is a little extreme, don't you think? – radsdau Sep 30 '16 at 4:37
  • 1
    It doesn't handle escaped / nested commas, etc. Will work in some cases but definitely won't work for all csv files – NStuke Oct 10 '16 at 23:56
  • Your are right; I'll edit the reply to reflect that. Thanks. But it does still have its place. – radsdau Oct 11 '16 at 6:26
0

This code reads csv to DataTable:

public static DataTable ReadCsv(string path)
{
    DataTable result = new DataTable("SomeData");
    using (TextFieldParser parser = new TextFieldParser(path))
    {
        parser.TextFieldType = FieldType.Delimited;
        parser.SetDelimiters(",");
        bool isFirstRow = true;
        //IList<string> headers = new List<string>();

        while (!parser.EndOfData)
        {
            string[] fields = parser.ReadFields();
            if (isFirstRow)
            {
                foreach (string field in fields)
                {
                    result.Columns.Add(new DataColumn(field, typeof(string)));
                }
                isFirstRow = false;
            }
            else
            {
                int i = 0;
                DataRow row = result.NewRow();
                foreach (string field in fields)
                {
                    row[i++] = field;
                }
                result.Rows.Add(row);
            }
        }
    }
    return result;
}
  • 1
    TextFieldParser is in Microsoft.VisualBasic.dll. – user3285954 Feb 2 '18 at 18:43
0

Another one to this list, Cinchoo ETL - an open source library to read and write multiple file formats (CSV, flat file, Xml, JSON etc)

Sample below shows how to read CSV file quickly (No POCO object required)

string csv = @"Id, Name
1, Carl
2, Tom
3, Mark";

using (var p = ChoCSVReader.LoadText(csv)
    .WithFirstLineHeader()
    )
{
    foreach (var rec in p)
    {
        Console.WriteLine($"Id: {rec.Id}");
        Console.WriteLine($"Name: {rec.Name}");
    }
}

Sample below shows how to read CSV file using POCO object

public partial class EmployeeRec
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

static void CSVTest()
{
    string csv = @"Id, Name
1, Carl
2, Tom
3, Mark";

    using (var p = ChoCSVReader<EmployeeRec>.LoadText(csv)
        .WithFirstLineHeader()
        )
    {
        foreach (var rec in p)
        {
            Console.WriteLine($"Id: {rec.Id}");
            Console.WriteLine($"Name: {rec.Name}");
        }
    }
}

Please check out articles at CodeProject on how to use it.

protected by NullPoiиteя Oct 21 '13 at 14:31

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