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I'm having problems with 'Learning Perl 6th Edition' Chapter 5 Question 1.

The question is to write a program that acts like cat but reverses the order of the output lines.

The book gives the answer as print reverse <>;

I'm running Perl v5.14.2

My code is:

#!/usr/bin/perl -w
print reverse <>;

After this I ran chmod 755 on the file to make sure it was executable.

On the command line I'm trying:

./tac.pl I am the walrus

I'm getting this in return:

Useless use of reverse in void context at ./tac.pl line 3.
Can't open I: No such file or directory at ./tac.pl line 3.
Can't open am: No such file or directory at ./tac.pl line 3.
Can't open the: No such file or directory at ./tac.pl line 3.
Can't open walrus: No such file or directory at ./tac.pl line 3.
Use of uninitialized value in reverse at ./tac.pl line 3.

Any idea what's causing this issue?

  • Hint: run cat I am the walrus – this doesn't work either. You should put multiple lines into a file of their own: cat text.txt and ./tac.pl text.txt. – amon Dec 28 '13 at 22:12
  • I believe the book has that on subsequent lines … i.e.. press RETURN after ./tac.pl – BRPocock Dec 28 '13 at 22:19
  • It works now when it uses a file as an argument. I was trying, as amon showed using cat as an example, to incorrectly pass command line arguments directly to the program when I needed to use a text file. – Kontophoros Dec 28 '13 at 22:33
  • Useless use of reverse in void context? You also have a problem with line endings, since perl didn't see the print. Use a CRLF for a Windows build of Perl, and LF endings elsewhere, including cygwin. – ikegami Dec 29 '13 at 5:18
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The arguments on the command line are the names of the files that the line input operator reads. All of the the lines of all of the files are read, passed to reverse as a list, and that reversed list is passed to print.

Create these files:

fred

fred line one
fred line two
fred line three

barney

barney line 1
barney line 2
barney line 3
barney line 4

betty

betty line a
betty line b
betty line c

When you cat these, you get:

$ cat fred barney betty
fred line one
fred line two
fred line three
barney line 1
barney line 2
barney line 3
barney line 4
betty line a
betty line b
betty line c

Now, the Perl program we gave as the answer wants you to reverse that. betty line c should be first and fred line one should be last. When you run the program just as you have written it, that's what you should see:

$ perl tac.pl fred barney betty
betty line c
betty line b
betty line a
barney line 4
barney line 3
barney line 2
barney line 1
fred line three
fred line two
fred line one

In your question, you passed arguments to your program, but they didn't represent filenames. The line input operator, <>, had nothing to read because the magic that made that work fails when none of the files exist. That's where the weird warnings come in.

If you have further problems, adjust the question in the form I just showed you. Show the input files and exactly how ran your program. Good luck, :)

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You are running the program in the wrong way when you are using the diamond operator. The program expects to find files named "I", "am", "the", and "walrus" when you run it in that way. Run it without parameters and you will have a program that reads from STDIN. I thought the book told you this before you got this far through it.

More about <> can be found here http://perldoc.perl.org/perlop.html (and other places).

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