3

I have a python script which is something like that:

def test_run():
     global files_dir
     for f1 in os.listdir(files_dir):
          for f2 os.listdir(files_dir):
               os.system("run program x on f1 and f2")

what is the best way to call each of the os.system calls on different processor? using subprocess or multiprocessing pool?

NOTE : each run of the program will generate an output file.

1
  • Which version of Python? This is easiest to do with concurrent.futures, but that requires Python 3. In Python 2, use multiprocessing.
    – Tim Peters
    Dec 29 '13 at 1:01
9

@unutbu's answer is fine, but there's a less disruptive way to do it: use a Pool to pass out tasks. Then you don't have to muck with your own queues. For example,

import os
NUM_CPUS = None  # defaults to all available

def worker(f1, f2):
    os.system("run program x on f1 and f2")

def test_run(pool):
     filelist = os.listdir(files_dir)
     for f1 in filelist:
          for f2 in filelist:
               pool.apply_async(worker, args=(f1, f2))

if __name__ == "__main__":
     import multiprocessing as mp
     pool = mp.Pool(NUM_CPUS)
     test_run(pool)
     pool.close()
     pool.join()

That "looks a lot more like" the code you started with. Not that this is necessarily a good thing ;-)

In a recent version of Python 3, Pool objects can also be used as context managers, so the tail end could be reduced to:

if __name__ == "__main__":
     import multiprocessing as mp
     with mp.Pool(NUM_CPUS) as pool:
         test_run(pool)

EDIT: using concurrent.futures instead

For very simple tasks like this, Python 3's concurrent.futures can be easier to use. Replace the code in the above, from test_run() on down, like so:

def test_run():
     import concurrent.futures as cf
     filelist = os.listdir(files_dir)
     with cf.ProcessPoolExecutor(NUM_CPUS) as pp:
         for f1 in filelist:
             for f2 in filelist:
                 pp.submit(worker, f1, f2)

if __name__ == "__main__":
     test_run()

It needs to be fancier if you don't want exceptions in worker processes to vanish silently. That's a potential problem with all parallelism gimmicks. The problem is that there's usually no good way to raise exceptions in the main program, since they occur in contexts (worker processes) that may have nothing to do with what the main program is doing at the time. One way to get the exceptions (re)raised in the main program is to explicitly ask for the results; for example, change the above to:

def test_run():
     import concurrent.futures as cf
     filelist = os.listdir(files_dir)
     futures = []
     with cf.ProcessPoolExecutor(NUM_CPUS) as pp:
         for f1 in filelist:
             for f2 in filelist:
                 futures.append(pp.submit(worker, f1, f2))
     for future in cf.as_completed(futures):
         future.result()

Then if an exception occurs in a worker process, the future.result() will re-raise that exception in the main program when it's applied to the Future object that represents the failing inter-process call.

Probably more than you wanted to know at this point ;-)

0
3

You could use a mixture of subprocess and multiprocessing. Why both? If you just use subprocess naively, you would spawn as many subprocesses as there are tasks. You could easily have thousands of tasks, and spawning that many subprocesses all at once may bring your machine to its knees.

So you could instead use multiprocessing to spawn only as many worker processes as your machine has CPUs (mp.cpu_count()). Each worker process could then read tasks (pairs of filenames) from a Queue, and spawn a subprocess. The worker should then wait until the subprocess completes before processing another task from the Queue.

import multiprocessing as mp
import itertools as IT
import subprocess

SENTINEL = None
def worker(queue):
    # read items from the queue and spawn subproceses
    # The for-loop ends when queue.get() returns SENTINEL
    for f1, f2 in iter(queue.get, SENTINEL):
        proc = subprocess.Popen(['prog', f1, f2])
        proc.communicate()

def test_run(files_dir):
    # avoid globals when possible. Pass files_dir as an argument to the function
    # global files_dir  
    queue = mp.Queue()

    # Setup worker processes. The workers will all read from the same queue.
    procs = [mp.Process(target=worker, args=[queue]) for i in mp.cpu_count()]
    for p in procs:
        p.start()

    # put items (tasks) in the queue
    files = os.listdir(files_dir)
    for f1, f2 in IT.product(files, repeat=2):
        queue.put((f1, f2))
    # Put sentinels in the queue to signal the worker processes to end    
    for p in procs:    
        queue.put(SENTINEL)

    for p in procs:
        p.join()

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