782

I have several methods all with the same parameter types and return values but different names and blocks. I want to pass the name of the method to run to another method that will invoke the passed method.

public int Method1(string)
{
    // Do something
    return myInt;
}

public int Method2(string)
{
    // Do something different
    return myInt;
}

public bool RunTheMethod([Method Name passed in here] myMethodName)
{
    // Do stuff
    int i = myMethodName("My String");
    // Do more stuff
    return true;
}

public bool Test()
{
    return RunTheMethod(Method1);
}

This code does not work but this is what I am trying to do. What I don't understand is how to write the RunTheMethod code since I need to define the parameter.

2
  • 13
    Why don't you pass a delegate instead of the name of the method? – Mark Byers Jan 17 '10 at 21:02
  • The question claims method signature is about parameters and return values, when it really comprises parameter types and method name. Return type doesn't matter, indeed you cannot declare two methods that only differ from return types. In contrast, you can declare methods whose only name is different. I've just edited your question to fix this and some other things. – Davide Cannizzo Aug 23 '20 at 13:01

11 Answers 11

940

You can use the Func delegate in .net 3.5 as the parameter in your RunTheMethod method. The Func delegate allows you to specify a method that takes a number of parameters of a specific type and returns a single argument of a specific type. Here is an example that should work:

public class Class1
{
    public int Method1(string input)
    {
        //... do something
        return 0;
    }

    public int Method2(string input)
    {
        //... do something different
        return 1;
    }

    public bool RunTheMethod(Func<string, int> myMethodName)
    {
        //... do stuff
        int i = myMethodName("My String");
        //... do more stuff
        return true;
    }

    public bool Test()
    {
        return RunTheMethod(Method1);
    }
}
13
  • 61
    How would the Func call change if the Method has as signature of returning void and no parameters? I can't seem to get the syntax to work. – user31673 Jan 17 '10 at 21:38
  • 234
    @unknown: In that case it would be Action instead of Func<string, int>. – Jon Skeet Jan 17 '10 at 21:45
  • 14
    but now what if you want to pass in arguments to the method?? – john ktejik Feb 24 '14 at 2:28
  • 47
    @user396483 For example, Action<int,string> corresponds to a method which is taking 2 parameters (int and string) and returning void. – serdar Jun 12 '14 at 10:30
  • 29
    @NoelWidmer Using Func<double,string,int> corresponds to a method which takes 2 parameters (double and string) and returning int. Last specified type is the return type. You can use this delegate for up to 16 parameters. If you somehow need more, write your own delegate as public delegate TResult Func<in T1, in T2, (as many arguments as you want), in Tn, out TResult>(T1 arg1, T2 arg2, ..., Tn argn);. Please correct me if I misunderstood. – serdar Sep 11 '14 at 6:43
385

You need to use a delegate. In this case all your methods take a string parameter and return an int - this is most simply represented by the Func<string, int> delegate1. So your code can become correct with as simple a change as this:

public bool RunTheMethod(Func<string, int> myMethodName)
{
    // ... do stuff
    int i = myMethodName("My String");
    // ... do more stuff
    return true;
}

Delegates have a lot more power than this, admittedly. For example, with C# you can create a delegate from a lambda expression, so you could invoke your method this way:

RunTheMethod(x => x.Length);

That will create an anonymous function like this:

// The <> in the name make it "unspeakable" - you can't refer to this method directly
// in your own code.
private static int <>_HiddenMethod_<>(string x)
{
    return x.Length;
}

and then pass that delegate to the RunTheMethod method.

You can use delegates for event subscriptions, asynchronous execution, callbacks - all kinds of things. It's well worth reading up on them, particularly if you want to use LINQ. I have an article which is mostly about the differences between delegates and events, but you may find it useful anyway.


1 This is just based on the generic Func<T, TResult> delegate type in the framework; you could easily declare your own:

public delegate int MyDelegateType(string value)

and then make the parameter be of type MyDelegateType instead.

22
  • 66
    +1 This really is an amazing answer to rattle off in two minutes. – David Hall Jan 17 '10 at 21:09
  • 3
    While you can pass the function using delegates, a more traditional OO approach would be to use the strategy pattern. – Paolo Jan 17 '10 at 21:14
  • 22
    @Paolo: Delegates are just a very convenient implementation of the strategy pattern where the strategy in question only requires a single method. It's not like this is going against the strategy pattern - but it's a heck of a lot more convenient than implementing the pattern using interfaces. – Jon Skeet Jan 17 '10 at 21:18
  • 5
    Are the "classic" delegates (as known from .NET 1/2) still useful, or are they completely obsolete because of Func/Action? Also, isn't there a delegate keyword missing in your example public **delegate** int MyDelegateType(string value)? – M4N Jan 17 '10 at 23:28
  • 2
    @JonSkeet: First, fantastic write-up. Humble suggestion for an edit: when I read the part where you translate the lambda into an anonymous function, and saw this: private static int <>_HiddenMethod_<>(string x) { ... } I was pretty confused for a minute, because <> is used for generics, of course. I spent a few minutes pasting this in C# to see if I was missing something, and then realized you were probably just marking the dynamic part. Changing this might smooth that down for others. Learned a lot from this, thanks! – Brian MacKay Aug 12 '16 at 13:13
122

From OP's example:

 public static int Method1(string mystring)
 {
      return 1;
 }

 public static int Method2(string mystring)
 {
     return 2;
 }

You can try Action Delegate! And then call your method using

 public bool RunTheMethod(Action myMethodName)
 {
      myMethodName();   // note: the return value got discarded
      return true;
 }

RunTheMethod(() => Method1("MyString1"));

Or

public static object InvokeMethod(Delegate method, params object[] args)
{
     return method.DynamicInvoke(args);
}

Then simply call method

Console.WriteLine(InvokeMethod(new Func<string,int>(Method1), "MyString1"));

Console.WriteLine(InvokeMethod(new Func<string, int>(Method2), "MyString2"));
6
  • 5
    Thanks, this got me where I wanted to go since I wanted a more generic "RunTheMethod" method that would allow for multiple parameters. Btw your first InvokeMethod lambda call should be RunTheMethod instead – John Jan 27 '12 at 18:26
  • 1
    Like John, this really helped me have a move generic method. Thanks! – ean5533 Nov 6 '12 at 23:39
  • 2
    You made my day ;) Really simple to use and much more flexible than the selected answer IMO. – Sidewinder94 Mar 27 '14 at 11:43
  • Is there a way to expand on RunTheMethod(() => Method1("MyString1")); to retrieve a return value? Ideally a generic? – Jay Jul 5 '16 at 16:32
  • if you want to pass parameters be aware of this: stackoverflow.com/a/5414539/2736039 – Ultimo_m Jun 12 '18 at 16:50
34

The solution involves Delegates, which are used to store methods to call. Define a method taking a delegate as an argument,

public static T Runner<T>(Func<T> funcToRun)
{
    // Do stuff before running function as normal
    return funcToRun();
}

Then pass the delegate on the call site:

var returnValue = Runner(() => GetUser(99));
4
  • 7
    It's very userfully. With this way, can use one or many parameters. I guess, the most updated answer is this. – bafsar Jan 23 '15 at 16:53
  • I'd like to add one thing about this implementation. If the method you are going to pass has return type of void, then you can't use this solution. – Imants Volkovs May 19 '16 at 21:00
  • @ImantsVolkovs I believe you might be able to to modify this to use an Action instead of a Func, and change the signature to void. Not 100% sure though. – Shockwave Mar 27 '17 at 9:37
  • 2
    Is there any way to get the parameters passed to the function that is called? – Jimmy Aug 3 '17 at 20:43
32

In order to provide a clear and complete answer, I'm going to start from the very beginning before coming up with three possible solutions.


A brief introduction

All languages that run on top of the CLR (Common Language Runtime), such as C#, F#, and Visual Basic, work under a VM that runs higher level code than machine code, which native languages like C and C++ are compiled to. It follows that methods aren't Assembly subroutines, nor are they values, unlike JavaScript as well as most functional languages; rather, they're definitions that CLR recognizes. Thus, you cannot think to pass a method as a parameter, because methods don't produce any values themselves, as they're not expressions but statements, which are stored in the generated assemblies. At this point, you'll face delegates.


What's a delegate?

A delegate represents a handle to a method (the term handle is to be preferred over pointer as it is implementation–dependent.) As I said above, a method is not a value, hence there's a special class in CLR languages, namely Delegate, which wraps up any method.

Look at the following example:

static void MyMethod()
{
    Console.WriteLine("I was called by the Delegate special class!");
}

static void CallAnyMethod(Delegate yourMethod)
{
    yourMethod.DynamicInvoke(new object[] { /*Array of arguments to pass*/ });
}

static void Main()
{
    CallAnyMethod(MyMethod);
}

Three different solutions, the same underlying concept:

  • The type–unsafe way
    Using the Delegate special class directly the same way as the example above. The drawback here is your code being type–unsafe, allowing arguments to be passed dynamically, with no constraints.

  • The custom way
    Besides the Delegate special class, the concept of delegates spreads to custom delegates, which are declarations of methods preceded by the delegate keyword. They are type–checked the same as method declarations, leading to flawlessly safe code.

    Here's an example:

    delegate void PrintDelegate(string prompt);
    
    static void PrintSomewhere(PrintDelegate print, string prompt)
    {
        print(prompt);
    }
    
    static void PrintOnConsole(string prompt)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(prompt);
    }
    
    static void PrintOnScreen(string prompt)
    {
        MessageBox.Show(prompt);
    }
    
    static void Main()
    {
        PrintSomewhere(PrintOnConsole, "Press a key to get a message");
        Console.Read();
        PrintSomewhere(PrintOnScreen, "Hello world");
    }
    
  • The standard library's way
    Alternatively, you can use a delegate that's part of the .NET Standard:

    • Action wraps up a parameterless void method.
    • Action<T1> wraps up a void method with one parameter of type T1.
    • Action<T1, T2> wraps up a void method with two parameters of types T1 and T2, respectively.
    • And so forth...
    • Func<TR> wraps up a parameterless function with TR return type.
    • Func<T1, TR> wraps up a function with TR return type and with one parameter of type T1.
    • Func<T1, T2, TR> wraps up a function with TR return type and with two parameters of types T1 and T2, respectively.
    • And so forth...

    However, bear in mind that using predefined delegates like these, parameter names won't describe what they have to be passed in, nor is the delegate name meaningful on what it's supposed to do. Therefore, be cautious about when to use these delegates and refrain from using them in contexts where their purpose is not absolutely self–evident.

The latter solution is the one most people posted. I'm still mentioning it in my answer for the sake of completeness.

1
  • 2
    Shouldn't the return type of a Func<T> be the last? Func<T1,T2,TR> – sanmcp May 13 '19 at 19:20
14

You should use a Func<string, int> delegate, that represents a function taking a string argument and returning an int value:

public bool RunTheMethod(Func<string, int> myMethod)
{
    // Do stuff
    myMethod.Invoke("My String");
    // Do stuff
    return true;
}

Then invoke it this way:

public bool Test()
{
    return RunTheMethod(Method1);
}
1
  • 4
    This won't compile. The Test method should be return RunTheMethod(Method1); – p.s.w.g Aug 23 '13 at 21:34
2

While the accepted answer is absolutely correct, I would like to provide an additional method.

I ended up here after doing my own searching for a solution to a similar question. I am building a plugin driven framework, and as part of it I wanted people to be able to add menu items to the applications menu to a generic list without exposing an actual Menu object because the framework may deploy on other platforms that don't have Menu UI objects. Adding general info about the menu is easy enough, but allowing the plugin developer enough liberty to create the callback for when the menu is clicked was proving to be a pain. Until it dawned on me that I was trying to re-invent the wheel and normal menus call and trigger the callback from events!

So the solution, as simple as it sounds once you realize it, eluded me until now.

Just create separate classes for each of your current methods, inherited from a base if you must, and just add an event handler to each.

1

Here is an example Which can help you better to understand how to pass a function as a parameter.

Suppose you have Parent page and you want to open a child popup window. In the parent page there is a textbox that should be filled basing on child popup textbox.

Here you need to create a delegate.

Parent.cs // declaration of delegates public delegate void FillName(String FirstName);

Now create a function which will fill your textbox and function should map delegates

//parameters
public void Getname(String ThisName)
{
     txtname.Text=ThisName;
}

Now on button click you need to open a Child popup window.

  private void button1_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
  {
        ChildPopUp p = new ChildPopUp (Getname) //pass function name in its constructor

         p.Show();

    }

IN ChildPopUp constructor you need to create parameter of 'delegate type' of parent //page

ChildPopUp.cs

    public  Parent.FillName obj;
    public PopUp(Parent.FillName objTMP)//parameter as deligate type
    {
        obj = objTMP;
        InitializeComponent();
    }



   private void OKButton_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {


        obj(txtFirstName.Text); 
        // Getname() function will call automatically here
        this.DialogResult = true;
    }
1
  • Edited but quality of this answer could still be improved. – SteakOverflow May 25 '16 at 9:28
1

If you want to pass Method as parameter, use:

using System;

public void Method1()
{
    CallingMethod(CalledMethod);
}

public void CallingMethod(Action method)
{
    method();   // This will call the method that has been passed as parameter
}

public void CalledMethod()
{
    Console.WriteLine("This method is called by passing parameter");
}
0

Here is an example without a parameter: http://en.csharp-online.net/CSharp_FAQ:_How_call_a_method_using_a_name_string

with params: http://www.daniweb.com/forums/thread98148.html#

you basically pass in an array of objects along with name of method. you then use both with the Invoke method.

params Object[] parameters

2
  • Note that the name of the method isn't in a string - it's actually as a method group. Delegates are the best answer here, not reflection. – Jon Skeet Jan 17 '10 at 21:06
  • @Lette: In the method invocation, the expression used as the argument is a method group; it's the name of a method which is known at compile-time, and the compiler can convert this into a delegate. This is very different from the situation where the name is only known at execution time. – Jon Skeet Jan 17 '10 at 21:44
0
class PersonDB
{
  string[] list = { "John", "Sam", "Dave" };
  public void Process(ProcessPersonDelegate f)
  {
    foreach(string s in list) f(s);
  }
}

The second class is Client, which will use the storage class. It has a Main method that creates an instance of PersonDB, and it calls that object’s Process method with a method that is defined in the Client class.

class Client
{
  static void Main()
  {
    PersonDB p = new PersonDB();
    p.Process(PrintName);
  }
  static void PrintName(string name)
  {
    System.Console.WriteLine(name);
  }
}

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