0

I have been testing collision between two circles using the method:

Circle A = (x1,y1) Circle b = (x2,y2)
Radius A           Radius b

x1 - x2 = x' * x'
y1 - y2 = y' * y'

x' + y' = distance

square root of distance - Radius A + Radius B

and if the resulting answer is a negative number it is intersecting.

I have used this method in a test but it doesn't seem to be very accurate at all.

bool circle::intersects(circle & test)
{

Vector temp;
temp.setX(centre.getX() - test.centre.getX());
temp.setY(centre.getY() - test.centre.getY());

float distance;
float temp2;
float xt;
xt = temp.getX();
temp2 = xt * xt;
temp.setX(temp2);

xt = temp.getY();
temp2 = xt * xt;
temp.setY(temp2);

xt = temp.getX() + temp.getY();
distance = sqrt(xt);
xt = radius + test.radius;

if( distance - xt < test.radius)
{
    return true;
}
else return false;

}

This is the function using this method maybe I'm wrong here. I just wondered what other methods I could use. I know separating axis theorem is better , but I wouldn't know where to start.

3
  • 2
    Please name your variables something meaningful, i.e. not temp and temp2. And please stop repeatedly using xt in different contexts. (Basically, naming your variables properly is half the problem here).
    – amnn
    Dec 29 '13 at 15:20
  • the naming is shocking the reuse of variables for different things is bad. the use of vector temp just complicates things. But the "error" is in the basic math near the end. Dec 29 '13 at 15:21
  • Try checking if(DistanceFromCentres <= SumOfRadii) Also, are your circles of different sizes?
    – Valentin
    Dec 29 '13 at 15:58
5

enter image description here

if( distance - xt < test.radius)
{
return true;
}

distance - xt will evaluate to the blue line, the distance between the two disks. It also meets the condition of being less than the test radius, but there is no collision going on.

The solution:

enter image description here

 if(distance <= (radius + test.radius) )
return true;

Where distance is the distance from the centres.

0
4

Given: xt = radius + test.radius;

The correct test is: if( distance < xt)

Here is an attempt to re-write the body for you: (no compiler, so may be errors)

bool circle::intersects(circle & test)
{
    float x = this->centre.getX() - test.centre.getX()
    float y = this->centre.getY() - test.centre.getY()  

    float distance = sqrt(x*x+y*y);

    return distance < (this->radius + test.radius);
}
5
  • also, I doubt there is any good cause to use floats instead of doubles, so consider changing that too. Dec 29 '13 at 15:29
  • A bit of aside question. What if the circles are moving and the check collision is at some interval let say 50 millis. What will be the right approach for not to miss a collision?
    – alex
    Dec 29 '13 at 15:34
  • @alex: this isn't an "aside question", more like an "offtopic question".
    – duedl0r
    Dec 29 '13 at 15:40
  • You should compare the squared distances instead of computing a square root. That's a very common optimization. Dec 29 '13 at 16:21
  • i agree, and would make the changes if you hadnt already done so. Dec 29 '13 at 21:06
1

Based on Richard solution but comparing the squared distance. This reduce the computation errors and the computation time.

bool circle::intersects(circle & test)
{
    float x = this->centre.getX() - test.centre.getX()
    float y = this->centre.getY() - test.centre.getY()  

    float distance2 = x * x + y * y;
    float intersect_distance2 = (this->radius + test.radius) * (this->radius + test.radius);

    return distance <= intersect_distance2;
}
3
  • I ended up with something very similar too this . Turned out it was an error with sfml and having to set the radius before you can use it. Also what does the "this->radius" do ? why not just "radius" ?
    – Student123
    Dec 29 '13 at 16:47
  • this-> is not mandatory. That depends on the language and the programmer. Dec 29 '13 at 17:50
  • the this-> does nothing but remind the reader that the item is a member variable (vs local/global/etc). some people decorate members eg with an m_ and in those cases omit the this->, but without such decoration generally I find code slightly clearer with it present Dec 29 '13 at 21:09
0

Use Pythagoras theorem to compute the distance between the centres

That is a straight line

If they have collided then that distance is shorter that the sum of the two radiuses

0

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.